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Thomas Kail’s Incredible Journey From Directing Sitcoms to Winning Awards to ‘Fosse/Verdon’

  • Indiewire
Thomas Kail’s Incredible Journey From Directing Sitcoms to Winning Awards to ‘Fosse/Verdon’
Nearly every director of note has some surprising stuff on their resume — after all, the path to success often includes some unusual detours. But Thomas Kail’s path to winning a Tony, an Emmy, and yet again becoming an Emmy contender for his work on FX’s “Fosse/Verdon”? It included a period of time hanging out on the set of CBS’s six-season multi-camera sitcom “2 Broke Girls.” Not an obvious point of entry into the awards scene, but a place where Kail told IndieWire “you take a lot of the skills that you’ve cultivated in the theater.”

Kail is currently an executive producer and director on the FX limited series, another project on which he’s collaborating with “Hamilton” mastermind Lin-Manuel Miranda. “Hamilton” is, of course, the Broadway blockbuster show Kail directed, which won 11 Tony awards (including one for Kail for direction), and in 2016, the Fox production of
See full article at Indiewire »

Shirley MacLaine movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Terms of Endearment,’ ‘The Apartment’

  • Gold Derby
Shirley MacLaine movies: 20 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Terms of Endearment,’ ‘The Apartment’
Shirley MacLaine celebrates her 85th birthday on April 24, 2019. The Oscar-winning performer has made dozens of movies in her 60-plus year career, but how many of those titles remain classics? In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1934, MacLaine is the older sister of Warren Beatty, proving that acting talent must run in the family. She made her screen debut with Alfred Hitchcock‘s “The Trouble with Harry” (1955) when she was just 21 years old. Her first Oscar nomination came three years later: Best Actress for “Some Came Running” (1958).

SEEOscar Best Actress Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

MacLaine would compete four more times at the Oscars unsuccessfully: three for Best Actress, once for Best Documentary Feature (“The Other Half of the Sky: A China Memoir” in 1975). She finally struck gold with James L. Brooks‘ comedic drama
See full article at Gold Derby »

Shirley MacLaine movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Shirley MacLaine movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best
Shirley MacLaine celebrates her 85th birthday on April 24, 2019. The Oscar-winning performer has made dozens of movies in her 60-plus year career, but how many of those titles remain classics? In honor of her birthday, let’s take a look back at 20 of her greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1934, MacLaine is the older sister of Warren Beatty, proving that acting talent must run in the family. She made her screen debut with Alfred Hitchcock‘s “The Trouble with Harry” (1955) when she was just 21 years old. Her first Oscar nomination came three years later: Best Actress for “Some Came Running” (1958).

MacLaine would compete four more times at the Oscars unsuccessfully: three for Best Actress, once for Best Documentary Feature (“The Other Half of the Sky: A China Memoir” in 1975). She finally struck gold with James L. Brooks‘ comedic drama “Terms of Endearment” (1983), playing a controlling mother who clashes with
See full article at Gold Derby »

David Picker, Studio Chief Who Acquired James Bond Novels for UA, Dies at 87

  • Variety
David Picker, Studio Chief Who Acquired James Bond Novels for UA, Dies at 87
David Picker, who headed United Artists, Paramount and Columbia’s motion picture divisions and was known for forging relationships with groundbreaking filmmakers and material, died Saturday in New York. He was 87 and had been suffering from colon cancer.

MGM tweeted, “We are saddened to hear that a member of the United Artists family has passed away. David Picker was a true visionary who brought iconic films to theaters such as the James Bond franchise.”

Picker brought the James Bond novels and the Beatles to United Artists; helped launch Steve Martin’s movie career and oversaw boundary-pushing movies like “Last Tango in Paris” and “Midnight Cowboy.”

Among the Hollywood figures who started out working for Picker as an assistant were Jeffrey Katzenberg, Bonnie Arnold, Tom Rothman and Jonathan Demme. His 2013, “Musts, Maybes and Nevers,” was a candid look at both his hits and flops, and he was honored with the PGA
See full article at Variety »

David Picker Dies: Former President Of United Artists, Paramount And Columbia Was 87

  • Deadline
David Picker Dies: Former President Of United Artists, Paramount And Columbia Was 87
Hollywood film executive David Picker, who was known for producing iconic films such as A Hard Day’s Night and The Jerk as well as launching the James Bond franchise, died in his New York home Saturday after complications with colon cancer. He was 87.

For over 40 years, Picker was an executive producer and served as the President and CEO for United Artists, Paramount, Lorimar and Columbia Pictures. Many of today’s top Hollywood luminaries worked for him as an assistant including Tom Rothman, Mark Gordon, Larry Mark, Bonnie Arnold, Jeffrey Katzenberg, Larry Kramer, and Jonathan Demme.

Picker was born in New York City on May 14, 1931. His storied and successful career in film would begin in 1956 when he worked in advertising and publicity at United Artists. He quickly rose in the ranks, becoming the assistant to the president and then managing United Artists Records. He would go on to bring the
See full article at Deadline »

Denise DuBarry Hay Dies: Coachella Valley Film Advocate Was 63

  • Deadline
Denise DuBarry Hay, a staunch advocate of the film industry in the Coachella Valley, died Saturday at UCLA Medical Center after battling a deadly fungus. She was 63 and her death was confirmed by her husband, Bill Hay.

DuBarry Hay began her career as an actress, apppearing in the TV series Black Sheep Squadron and CHiPs, as well as the film “Being There.”

But the business world was calling, and in 1990 she co-founded Thane International, a global direct response company, with husband, Bill Hay. The company was formed after Denise produced an infomercial in 1987 for a video, “Play the Piano Overnight.” The video became the basis for an “Overnight Music” series for Thane.

After selling Thane International, the Hays started Kaswit, Inc., an incubator for home and health products, including the book “Don Sullivan’s Secrets to Training the Perfect Dog” and training accessories.

In 1998, she was named Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year,
See full article at Deadline »

Denise DuBarry, Producer and 'Black Sheep Squadron' Actress, Dies at 63

Denise DuBarry, Producer and 'Black Sheep Squadron' Actress, Dies at 63
Denise DuBarry, an actress and producer who was president of Palm Springs Women in Film and Television, died Saturday at UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles after battling a deadly fungus, her husband told the Desert Sun newspaper. She was 63.

DuBarry appeared in Hal Ashby's Being There (1979), The Devil and Max Devlin (1981) and Monster in the Closet (1986); had a recurring role as nurse Samantha Greene Moore on Robert Conrad's Black Sheep Squadron; and showed up on the soap opera Days of Our Lives, CHiPs and The Love Boat.

A resident of La Quinta, DuBarry recently produced two films, Do It or Die (2017) ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Mahershala Ali (‘Green Book’) becomes 83rd Best Supporting Actor winner, joining Sam Rockwell, Christoph Waltz, Christian Bale and…

Mahershala Ali (‘Green Book’) becomes 83rd Best Supporting Actor winner, joining Sam Rockwell, Christoph Waltz, Christian Bale and…
Mahershala Ali added another Oscar as Best Supporting Actor to his shelf for his role as a talented concert pianist traveling through the 1960s South in “Green Book.” The victory comes just two years after his first win in the category for “Moonlight” (2016). He became the 83rd person in history to clinch that prize, beating out Adam Driver (“BlacKkKlansman”), Sam Elliott (“A Star Is Born”), Richard E. Grant (“Can You Ever Forgive Me?”) and Sam Rockwell (“Vice”). Tour our photo gallery above of every Academy Award winner for Best Supporting Actor, from the most recent winner to the very first one.

SEE2019 Oscars: Full list of winners (and losers) at the 91st Academy Awards

The supporting categories were added in 1936 at the ninth Academy Awards. Initially, winners were given plaques instead of gold statuettes, but starting in 1943 they were given full Oscars.

Since 1936, only eight actors have won this prize more than once.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Caleb Deschanel Got an Oscar Nod for Shooting ‘Never Look Away’ Even Though He Can’t Speak German

  • The Wrap
Caleb Deschanel Got an Oscar Nod for Shooting ‘Never Look Away’ Even Though He Can’t Speak German
A version of this story about Caleb Deschanel appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine.

For the first 38 years of the Academy Awards, foreign-language films were ignored in the Best Cinematography category. But in recent years, foreign fare has averaged almost one nomination a year — and this year three of the five nominations are for films not in English, tying the record set in 2004 when “House of Flying Daggers,” “The Passion of the Christ” and “A Very Long Engagement” were all nominated.

Interestingly enough, Caleb Deschanel was involved both of those years: He shot Mel Gibson’s 2004 nominee “The Passion of the Christ,” which was in Aramaic and Latin, and also is in the running this year for Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s German-language drama “Never Look Away.”

“The difference is that nobody on the set of ‘The Passion’ understood Aramaic and Latin,” Deschanel said with a laugh.
See full article at The Wrap »

Sam Elliott would enter the record books with a Best Supporting Actor Oscar win

Sam Elliott would enter the record books with a Best Supporting Actor Oscar win
The Best Supporting Actor Oscar category notoriously skews old — the top 10 oldest are at least 70 with an average of 75.1. That average could tick up this year if the statuette goes to Sam Elliott (“A Star Is Born”), who would be the sixth oldest supporting actor champ ever.

Elliott will be 74 years and 199 days old on Oscar night, and he would knock back Jack Palance (“City Slickers,” 1991) who was 73 years and 41 days old when he showed off his one-handed push-up prowess. The category’s oldest winner, of course, is Christopher Plummer, who was 82 years and 75 days old when he triumphed for “Beginners” (2011) and is also the oldest acting winner in any category. Plummer dethroned George Burns, who was the only other octogenarian supporting actor champ at 80 years and 69 days.

See ‘A Star Is Born’ at the Oscars: How did each version fare with the academy?

Often nicknamed the Career Achievement Award
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Nominee Caleb Deschanel On Connecting ‘Never Look Away’ With Emotion To Images + Mystery & More

  • Deadline
Oscar Nominee Caleb Deschanel On Connecting ‘Never Look Away’ With Emotion To Images + Mystery & More
Veteran cinematographer Caleb Deschanel last week scored his sixth Oscar nomination, for his work on Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s Never Look Away, one of the three Foreign Language nominees that crossed into other key categories this year. Deschanel, a respected Dp who has surprisingly never won the Academy Award, has such varied credits as Being There, The Black Stallion, The Right Stuff, The Natural, National Treasure, Killer Joe and The Passion Of The Christ. I caught up with him recently from London (where he’s working on this year’s The Lion King for Disney) to discuss his approach to Never Look Away, the mystery of creating art and connecting emotionally through images.

Never Look Away is inspired by the life of artist Gerhard Richter and premiered to much acclaim in Venice. It spans three eras of German history, centering on art student Kurt (Tom Schilling) who escapes post-war
See full article at Deadline »

The 100 Greatest Achievements in Cinematography in the 20th Century, According to Asc

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the American Society of Cinematographers (Asc) this year, they’ve polled their members to determine 100 milestone films in the art and craft of cinematography of the 20th century. Topping the list is David Lean’s epic Lawrence of Arabia, shot by Freddie Young. Also in the top ten is Blade Runner (Jordan Cronenweth), The Conformist (Vittorio Storaro), Days of Heaven (Néstor Almendros), and more.

Organized by Steven Fierberg, he said “Asc members wanted to call attention to the most significant achievements of the cinematographer’s art but not refer to one achievement as ‘better’ than another. The selected films represent a range of styles, eras and visual artistry, but most importantly, it commemorates films that are inspirational or influential to Asc members and have exhibited enduring influence on generations of filmmakers.”

See the top 10 below, along with the full list.

1. Lawrence of Arabia (1962), Freddie Young,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cinematographer’s Craft Drives Tragicomic Story in Czech Film ‘The Painted Bird’

  • Variety
Cinematographer’s Craft Drives Tragicomic Story in Czech Film ‘The Painted Bird’
Czech indie producer director Vaclav Marhoul says he knew from the moment he got his hands on Jerzy Kosinski’s Holocaust novel “The Painted Bird” that he had to adapt it for the screen.

Finding the book at all in Central Europe was not easy even a decade ago, when Marhoul took up the challenge of creating the mythic, war-torn land of the tragi-comic story by the author of “Being There”; it had long been banned during the communist era and copies were still rare, Marhoul says.

He credits below-the-line colleagues in Poland, Slovakia and the Czech Republic for much of the feat. To conjure the book’s dark and haunting world, the director brought in cinematographer Vladimir Smutny and production designer Jan Vlasak, two of the nation’s top creatives in their fields.

The Painted Bird” spins a netherworld of Slavic wartime horrors intermixed, Marhoul says, with just the right measure of hope.
See full article at Variety »

Review: Jeff Tweedy Plunges Into His Fears on ‘Warm’

Review: Jeff Tweedy Plunges Into His Fears on  ‘Warm’
“Just because I can’t describe it,” Jeff Tweedy sings halfway through Warm, “doesn’t mean I shouldn’t try.” On his first formal solo album of new songs (and second non-Wilco project in the last few years), Tweedy — never one to take a year off from songwriting — plunges far into his own fears, thoughts and anxieties. The result is a probing collection of understated indie-folk.

Tweedy takes a laid-back, contented singer-songwriter approach not dissimilar to the down-tempo mood of Wilco’s most recent offering, Schmilco. As the title suggests,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Happy as Lazzaro’ Film Review: Alice Rohrwacher Charts the Course of a Holy Fool

  • The Wrap
‘Happy as Lazzaro’ Film Review: Alice Rohrwacher Charts the Course of a Holy Fool
Magic can be a tricky thing to put on a movie screen, where one viewer’s rapture can be another’s Wtf. Italian director Alice Rohrwacher, making her third trip to Cannes with only her third movie, delivers a little of each with “Happy as Lazzaro” (“Lazzaro Felice”), which premiered in competition at the Cannes Film Festival in May.

Rohrwacher’s leisurely-paced film flits between social realism (see these poor exploited workers!) and magical realism (see the boy who never ages!), in ways that are sometimes transporting and sometimes maddening. If you can surrender to her peculiar vision, its beauty is undeniable; if not, impatience may set in long before the film winds down just past the two-hour mark.

In some ways, Rohrwacher, the second of the three female directors in the competition to screen, is the polar opposite of Eva Husson, whose “Girls of the Sun” was the first of the three to screen.
See full article at The Wrap »

Sam Elliott (‘A Star Is Born’) would be 6th oldest Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner

Sam Elliott (‘A Star Is Born’) would be 6th oldest Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner
The Best Supporting Actor Oscar race could be one for the ages. Timothee Chalamet (“Beautiful Boy”) could become the second youngest winner in the category, but on the other end of the spectrum, Sam Elliott (“A Star Is Born”) could become one of the oldest.

Elliott, who will be 74 years and 199 days old on the Feb. 24 ceremony, would become the sixth oldest Best Supporting Actor champ, dethroning Jack Palance who was 73 years and 41 days old when he did those one-handed push-ups. He’d be a few years off of the fifth spot, held by “Cocoon” (1981) Don Ameche, who was 77 years and 297 days old, and eight years shy of the record set by Christopher Plummer, who became the oldest acting winner in any category at 82 years and 75 days old when he prevailed for “Beginners” (2011).

See Sam Elliott (‘A Star Is Born’) on how he reacted when Bradley Cooper stole his voice
See full article at Gold Derby »

Pablo Ferro, Legendary Title Designer for ‘Dr. Strangelove,’ Dies at 83

  • Variety
Pablo Ferro, Legendary Title Designer for ‘Dr. Strangelove,’ Dies at 83
Pablo Ferro, who designed the title sequences for classic films like Stanley Kubrick’s “Dr. Strangelove,” “Bullitt,” “Men In Black,” and “A Clockwork Orange,” has died from complications from pneumonia in Sedona, Ariz. He was 83.

Ferro’s family confirmed the news to industry publication the Art of the Title.

Cuban-born Ferro’s first title sequence was for “Dr. Strangelove,” and featured cards that were hand-lettered with grease pencil on glass. Another of his early notable title sequences was for 1968’s “The Thomas Crowne Affair,” directed by Norman Jewison.

Ferro, who was born on a farm in Antilla and moved to New York in his teens, began as an illustrator for Atlas Comics and worked with Stan Lee on a series of science fiction adventure comics. From there, he got a job with Academy Pictures, eventually becoming an animator for the company, before transitioning to work for Elektra Films on sophisticated commercials.
See full article at Variety »

Podtalk: Filmmaker Amy Scott Revitalizes Director Hal Ashby in Her New Documentary ‘Hal’

Chicago – The name Hal Ashby might not be as familiar to today’s film watchers, but the movies he made in the 1970s are considered classics… like “Harold and Maude,” “The Last Detail,” “Shampoo,” “Coming Home” and “Being There.” The short spark of his creative energy is profiled in a documentary by Amy Scott simply called “Hal.” The film opens at the Gene Siskel Film Center on November 9th, 2018. For details and ticket info, click here.

Director Hal Ashby is Revived in Amy Scott’s ‘Hal

Photo credit: Oscilloscope

The doc is an overview of Ashby’s career – he was a film editor turned director – and while his name is overshadowed by the showier filmmakers of “New Hollywood” of the 1970s, his cinema works live on as essential, and reflectively human. Director Amy Scott presents a meticulous overview of his rise and fall in his later career, culminating in his
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

‘Kusama: Infinity’ Tops New Releases, but the Real Specialty Box-Office Story Is ‘The Wife’

  • Indiewire
Post-Labor Day weekend is not a time with high-profile new releases, but the weekend’s most significant story isn’t a new title: It’s the strength of Sony Pictures Classics’ “The Wife.” A Toronto 2017 premiere that made its theatrical debut August 17, it’s seeing some of the best results for specialized drama this year in its national expansion as it heads into awards season.

This weekend also saw the debut of multiple Sundance-debuted documentaries, with “Kusama: Infinity” as the standout in its two-city start. And “Blaze” opened three theaters in New York after several weeks in Texas, with a positive result. This risky release pattern seems to click.

Opening

Kusama: Infinity (Magnolia) – Metacritic: 69; Festivals include: Sundance 2018

$30,400 in 2 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $15,200

This documentary about 89-year-old Japanese multi-platform artist Yayoi Kusama saw strong New York-Los Angeles interest (one theater each). Expect that to replicate as it expands.

What
See full article at Indiewire »

Hal Ashby Documentary, ‘The Apparition’ & ‘Five Fingers For Marseilles’ Hit Screens: Specialty Preview

  • Deadline
Hal Ashby Documentary, ‘The Apparition’ & ‘Five Fingers For Marseilles’ Hit Screens: Specialty Preview
Weekend debuts are minimal as the film industry’s gravity heads north to the Toronto International Film Festival, though some roll outs hope to fill a narrow vacuum of new specialties in the marketplace ahead of the coming fall onslaught. Sundance premiere, Hal, about Oscar-nominated filmmaker Hal Ashby boasts an impressive roster of stars talking about the director behind classics such as Harold and Maude, Shampoo and Being There. Oscilloscope opens the doc exclusively in New York today before heading to L.A. next weekend. Music Box Films is rolling out French drama-mystery The Apparition, which it first viewed in the European Film Market coinciding with the Berlinale in February. And Uncork’d Entertainment is spearheading the stateside launch of South Africa’s Five Fingers for Marseilles, which it picked up out of Toronto last year, heading out Friday in a day and date release.

Also notable is that Ethan Hawke
See full article at Deadline »
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