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Anthony Ray Dies: ‘Shadows’ Actor, Son Of Director Nicholas Ray Was 80

Anthony “Tony” Ray, the actor-producer son of Rebel Without a Cause director Nicholas Ray, died June 29 in Saco, Maine, following a long illness, his family has announced. Ray, who lived in Saco for the last 10 years, was 80.

A graduate of the Neighborhood Playhouse and a member of the Actor’s Studio, Ray was on the producing teams of such 1970s hits as The Rose, An Unmarried Woman, Harry and Tonto, and Freebie and the Bean. He was an assistant director throughout the 1960s and into the ’70s on TV series The Iron Horse and Bewitched, films Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, Cactus Flower, and, according to his family, Stanley Kubrick’s Spartacus and John Huston’s The Misfits, among other credits.

Ray, who often went by the name Tony Ray, also worked as an actor, his credits starting in 1957 with Men In War and an uncredited appearance in
See full article at Deadline »

Anthony Ray, Actor, Oscar-Nominated Producer and Son of Director Nicholas Ray, Dies at 80

Anthony Ray, Actor, Oscar-Nominated Producer and Son of Director Nicholas Ray, Dies at 80
Anthony Ray, a son of Rebel Without a Cause director Nicholas Ray who appeared in John Cassavetes' Shadows and earned an Oscar nomination for producing An Unmarried Woman, has died. He was 80.

Ray died June 29 in Saco, Maine, after a long illness, his family announced.

Just after he turned 20, Ray appeared on Broadway in the Elia Kazan and William Inge drama The Dark at the Top of the Stairs, which debuted in December 1957 and ran for more than 450 performances.

In Shadows (1958), Cassavetes' admired feature debut, Ray portrayed Tony — a young man who sleeps with a virgin (Lelia Goldoni) and ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Next Stop, Greenwich Village

Paul Mazursky’s affectionate memoir of the New York bohemian life circa 1953 has a feel for the milieu and an honest appraisal of the kooky culture therein: artists, actors, users, takers, sweethearts, neurotics and phonies. Lenny Baker’s main character may have an amorous relationship with his girlfriend Ellen Greene, but his strongest connection is with his overbearing mother, played to perfection by Shelley Winters. She was a Best Supporting Actress nominee for The Poseidon Adventure but not for this? Honestly.

Next Stop, Greenwich Village

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1976 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 111 min. / Street Date May 22, 2018 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: Lenny Baker, Shelley Winters, Ellen Greene, Lois Smith, Christopher Walken, Dori Brenner, Antonio Fargas, Lou Jacobi.

Cinematography: Arthur Ornitz

Film Editor: Richard Halsey

Original music: Bill Conti

Production Designer: Phil Rosenberg

Produced by Paul Mazursky and Tony Ray

Written and Directed by Paul Mazursky

Fans of Paul
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Movie Poster of the Week: Sir Alan Bates in Posters

  • MUBI
Above: UK one sheet for The Shout (Jerzy Skolimowski, UK, 1978)One of the greatest but perhaps less heralded of British actors, Sir Alan Bates (1934-2003) is being deservedly feted over the next week at the Quad Cinema in New York with the retrospective series Alan Bates: The Affable Angry Young Man. The title makes sense: before he had acted on film Bates was in the original West End and Broadway productions of Look Back in Anger, but he played not the disaffected anti-hero Jimmy Porter, made famous on film by Richard Burton, but the amiable Welsh lodger Cliff. Though a performer of great virility, intelligence and passion, he often played second fiddle to his more demonstrative co-stars—whether Anthony Quinn in Zorba the Greek (1964), Lynn Redgrave in Georgy Girl (1966), Julie Christie in Far From the Madding Crowd (1967) and The Go-Between (1971), or Jill Clayburgh in An Unmarried Woman (1978). Consequently, he is
See full article at MUBI »

Meryl Streep in ‘The Deer Hunter’: A look back at her first Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The Deer Hunter’: A look back at her first Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 1 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

Prior to 1978, Meryl Streep was best-known for her acclaimed New York stage work. She made five Broadway appearances between 1975 and 1977, including a turn in “A Memory of Two Mondays/27 Wagons Full of Cotton” (1976) that brought Streep her first – and to date, only – Tony Award nomination. Her sole big screen appearance was a small, albeit memorable, turn opposite Jane Fonda in “Julia” (1977).

Streep’s name recognition increased significantly in 1978. First, there was her much-heralded performance in the epic NBC miniseries “Holocaust” that resulted in an Emmy Award. It was her second-ever appearance in a feature film, however – and in a Best Picture Academy Awards winner, no
See full article at Gold Derby »

Pour 1 Out For the Movies and TV Shows Leaving Netflix in July

Netflix giveth, and Netflix taketh away. After releasing the incredible list of new titles it's adding in July (Titanic! Rogue One!), the streaming service also revealed which movies and TV shows will be disappearing before we know it. If your weekends consist of cuddling up and watching While You Were Sleeping or Futurama, we have some bad news . . . July 1 Blazing Saddles American Pie Presents: Band Camp Flicka 2 9/11: Stories in Fragments Secrets: The Sphinx Batman Working Girl Gentlemen Prefer Blondes An Unmarried Woman Hello, Dolly! MacGyver seasons one-seven Ghost Whisperer seasons one-five Futurama season six Day of the Kamikaze Mystery Files: Hitler Mystery Files: Leonardo da Vinci Nazi Temple of Doom The Hunt For Bin Laden The Incredible Bionic Man History in HD: The Last Bomb Secrets: A Viking Map? Secrets: Richard III Revealed Shuttle Discovery's Last Mission Titanic's Final Mystery Samurai Headhunters America's Secret D-Day Disaster Black Wings Blondie's New York Bombs, Bullets and Fraud Death Beach Hip Hop: The Furious Force of Rhymes American Pie Presents: Beta House Hugo American Pie Presents: The Naked Mile Angus, Thongs and Perfect Snogging While You Were Sleeping Kate & Leopold El Dorado July 3 The Last Samurai Two Weeks Notice July 6 Los Heroes del Norte seasons one-two July 11 Opposite Field July 12 Sleeping Beauty Adventures of Pepper and Paula In the Basement July 13 Kevin Hart: Laugh at My Pain July 15 Lessons For a Kiss All That Glitters
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Things to Come (2016)

Mia Hansen-Løve’s portrait of the travails of a middle-aged philosophy teacher is a plum acting vehicle for Isabelle Huppert It steers clear of crazy, extraordinary events to instead offer insights into how real people live and cope. The professor must dip into her subject matter to make sense of her life, and comes up sane. Folks expecting a feel-good satire about ‘goofy’ women can make do with Sally Field in Hello, My Name is Doris. Mia and Isabelle do well here.

Things to Come (2016)

Blu-ray

Mpi Media Group

2016 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 102 min. / L’avenir / Street Date May 9, 2017 / 19.08

Starring: Isabelle Huppert, André Marcon, Roman Kolinka, Edith Scob, Sarah Le Picard, Solal Forte, Elise Lhomeau, Lionel Dray-Rabotnik.

Cinematography: Denis Lenoir

Film Editor: Marion Monnier

Produced by Charles Gillibert

Written and Directed by Mia Hansen-Løve

French actress Isabelle Huppert had a great year in 2016, what with her Oscar nomination for Elle, a
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Tragedy, Neurosis, Sundance: The Long, Strange Journey of ‘Person to Person’ Director Dustin Guy Defa

Tragedy, Neurosis, Sundance: The Long, Strange Journey of ‘Person to Person’ Director Dustin Guy Defa
Dustin Guy Defa makes his Sundance Film Festival feature debut with “Person to Person,” and he doesn’t know what to expect. He’s had a lot of disappointments in his life, ranging from being the kind of penniless artist whose survival demands long-term couch surfing to overcoming a nightmare family of origin. (It yielded his 2011 Sundance short, “Family Nightmare.”)

However, “Person To Person” also gives real weight to the time-worn trope that values the journey over the destination. With a cast that includes names like Michael Cera and”Broad City” star Abbi Jacobson as well as indie filmmaking stalwarts like David Zellner and Benny Safdie, it reflects the success he’s had building his place in independent filmmaking and the joy he brings with it. “It comes through loud and clear in his work,” said filmmaker David Lowery, a longtime Defa fan. “It’s the reason why his movies
See full article at Indiewire »

AFI Fest to honour Isabelle Huppert

  • ScreenDaily
AFI Fest to honour Isabelle Huppert
The French star delivered one of the performances of the year in Paul Verhoeven’s Elle.

Isabelle Huppert will be the subject of a tribute and gala screening of Elle on November 13. She plays a successful businesswoman who tracks down her rapist.

Sony Pictures Classics acquired North America and select territories prior to the world premiere in Cannes and will release in the Us on November 11.

Isabelle Huppert is a masterful actress,” said AFI Fest director Jacqueline Lyanga. “Her fearlessness and precision shine in Elle, and we are thrilled to honour her illustrious career at the 30th edition of AFI Fest, as she exemplifies the best of world cinema.”

Huppert has earned a record 15 César Award nominations for an actress and won in 1995 for La Cérémonie.

She won the Cannes best actress prize for The Piano Teacher in 2001 and Violette in 1978 in a tie with Jill Clayburgh for An Unmarried Woman.

In 2002 she
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Feline lucky? Match the cat to the movie – quiz

As Kevin Spacey finds himself stuck inside a cat in this week’s family comedy Nine Lines, how well do you know other movie moggies?

Panic Room

The Gift

Gone Girl

The Glass House

The Third Man

Cat People

Pygmalion

The Black Cat

Let the Right One In

Catwoman

Insidious

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

The Getaway

Willard

The Long Goodbye

Harry and Tonto

Fallen

Pet Semetary

Needful Things

The Thing

An Unmarried Woman

Listen Up Phillip

Hannah and Her Sisters

The Squid and the Whale

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

What Lies Beneath

Taking Lives

Side Effects

Mean Girls

Sixteen Candles

Scream

Drag Me to Hell

Cats and Dogs

Stuart Little

Babe

Charlotte's Web

Hocus Pocus

Jumanji

Death Becomes Her

The Witches

10 and above.

Top cat

9 and above.

Top cat

8 and above.

Top cat

7 and above.

Top cat

6 and above.

A sad tail

5 and above.

A sad tail

4 and above.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Can you pass HitFix's hard-harder-hardest Oscar Quiz?

  • Hitfix
Can you pass HitFix's hard-harder-hardest Oscar Quiz?
Last year HitFix threw down a 21-question quiz for Oscar fanatics, and this year we're at it again. Join us for an ultimate Oscar test featuring three tiers of difficulty: hard, harder, and hardest. Get out a notepad! The answers are on the next page. (Please note that the term "actor" can mean a man or a woman, and that any listed year refers to the time of the movie's release, not the year of the ceremony.) Hard 1. What's the highest-grossing of this year's eight Best Picture nominees? 2. Jennifer Jason Leigh just received her first Oscar nomination for Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight. Only two performances in Quentin Tarantino's filmography have earned Academy Awards. Who performed those roles? 3. Which of this year's Best Picture nominees stars a character named Joy? 4. Who's the only person in history to win both an acting Oscar and a songwriting Oscar? 5. Name one
See full article at Hitfix »

An ode to the fine art of sneaking into R-rated movies when you're underage

  • Hitfix
An ode to the fine art of sneaking into R-rated movies when you're underage
Deadpool made $150 million this weekend, which is fairly amazing for an R-rated film. I'd be curious to know how much more it would have made if every single person who saw it actually paid for a ticket, because it does not take a genius to know that there were teenagers sneaking in to see it. Good for them. Let's be clear about something: the MPAA does not know your child, nor do they care about your child. The entire reason movie ratings exist is so the government didn't get involved in the process. Beyond that, they are outdated and out-of-touch, and absolutely useless as a practical guide for individual parents when it comes to understanding what is or isn't appropriate for your child. There are things I'd show my sons that you would not show to any kid, and there are things other parents have shown their kids that my
See full article at Hitfix »

Review: Joe Swanberg's 'Digging For Fire' With Jake Johnson Is One Of His Most Enjoyable Films Yet

Let’s get it out of the way immediately: Joe Swanberg’s “Digging For Fire” has been dubbed a more indie-oriented, small-scale “Eyes Wide Shut.” While the prolific filmmaker’s latest is also about the anxieties common to marriage and is dedicated to the memory of relationship-curious filmmaker Paul Mazursky (“An Unmarried Woman,” “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice”), the funny/sad “Digging For Fire” finds Swanberg using different approaches to track some similar ideas. Set in Southern California, married couple Tim (Jake Johnson) and Lee (Rosemarie DeWitt) are two East L.A.-side dwellers who decide to house-sit for one of Lee's yoga clients. They use the empty modern house in the Hollywood hills as an excuse for a weekend retreat, bringing their three-year-old son (played by Jude Swanberg, stealing just as many scenes as he did in his father's previous film “Happy Christmas”). As a yoga instructor, Lee is spiritually inclined,
See full article at The Playlist »

“I Don’t Ever Want to Cheat on a Woman Again”: Actor Michael Murphy on An Unmarried Woman, Altman and The American Experience

Actor Michael Murphy is perhaps best-known for his collaborations with Robert Altman, which practically spanned the director’s entire career. But, for a brief moment, he wasn’t known primarily for his turn as a political organizer in Nashville or other Altman roles, but for playing an adulterer. In two consecutive films — An Unmarried Woman and Manhattan — Murphy was the archetypal heel of the moment. That time has passed; Murphy is now often called upon to playspoliticians, judges and ambassadors, parts which take advantage of his patrician/Wasp-esque appearance: he looks like someone to the establishment manor born. Woman‘s place in […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

“I Don’t Ever Want to Cheat on a Woman Again”: Actor Michael Murphy on An Unmarried Woman, Altman and The American Experience

Actor Michael Murphy is perhaps best-known for his collaborations with Robert Altman, which practically spanned the director’s entire career. But, for a brief moment, he wasn’t known primarily for his turn as a political organizer in Nashville or other Altman roles, but for playing an adulterer. In two consecutive films — An Unmarried Woman and Manhattan — Murphy was the archetypal heel of the moment. That time has passed; Murphy is now often called upon to playspoliticians, judges and ambassadors, parts which take advantage of his patrician/Wasp-esque appearance: he looks like someone to the establishment manor born. Woman‘s place in […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Digging for Fire | Sundance Review - Sundance Film Festival 2015

Saturated with Hollywood actors, Digging for Fire is Swanberg's first truly Altmanesque ensemble piece, while also serving as an intelligent homage to the recently deceased filmmaker Paul Mazursky (Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, An Unmarried Woman). Despite the assembly line of accomplished actors walking in and out of frame, the film never once loses its low-key, improvisational rhythm. It seems like this cast motivated Swanberg to make his most cinematic film to date, placing significantly more focus on the visual construction and sound design. Digging for Fire -- Swanberg's third collaboration in a row with cinematographer Ben Richardson -- is his first foray into shooting on 35mm film. The synthesized score by composer Dan Romer sets a moody and discordant tone that often functions contradictory to the onscreen events, suggesting that we are only seeing what the characters will allow others to see, their real inner drama is being shielded from us.
See full article at SmellsLikeScreenSpirit »

Sundance Review: Joe Swanberg’s ‘Digging For Fire’ With Jake Johnson, Rosemarie DeWitt, Alison Brie and Sam Rockwell

Let’s get it out of the way immediately: Joe Swanberg’s “Digging For Fire” has been dubbed a more indie-oriented, small-scale “Eyes Wide Shut.” And while the prolific filmmaker’s latest is also about the anxieties common to marriage and is dedicated to the memory of relationship-curious filmmaker Paul Mazursky (“An Unmarried Woman,” “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice”), the funny/sad “Digging For Fire” finds Swanberg using different approaches to track some similar ideas. Set in Southern California, married couple Tim (Jake Johnson) and Lee (Rosemarie DeWitt) are two East L.A.-side dwellers who decide to house-sit for one of Lee's yoga clients. They use the empty modern house in the Hollywood hills as an excuse for a weekend retreat, bringing their three-year-old son (played by Jude Swanberg, stealing just as many scenes as he did in his father's previous film “Happy Christmas”). As a yoga instructor, Lee is spiritually inclined,
See full article at The Playlist »

Laura Dern on 'Wild,' Working From a Book and Playing a Mom Again

  • Moviefone
Sometimes, even when an actor isn't in many scenes, they resonate throughout the film; this is particularly true for Laura Dern, who plays Reese Witherspoon's mother in Jean-Marc Vallée's "Wild." Perhaps most fitting because she's technically a spirit, Dern's character floats in and out of the movie through Witherspoon's flashbacks and visions.

As always, Dern is a pleasure to behold, at times sweet and sensitive and at other times a dreamer, trying to instill those same qualities in her daughter. In "Wild," she's definitely not the biggest role, but she certainly is an omnipresent one.

Moviefone Canada caught up with Dern at the Toronto Film Festival, where we spoke about playing a mother to Witherspoon, the poignancy of "Wild," and lifting the mood on-set.

Moviefone Canada: This film has very strong female characters. Having been in the industry for a while, have you seen any changes in the
See full article at Moviefone »

The 50 Definitive Relationship Dramas: 40-31

40. Don’t Look Now (1973)

Directed by: Nicholas Roeg

A few films that could be defined as horror appear on this list, mostly because the best ones veer further into a psychological discussion on dealing with fear, death, and loss. Based on a short story by Daphne du Maurier, “Don’t Look Now” is a landmark of British-Italian cinema, thanks to its wonderfully developed characters and realistic depiction of grief. John and Laura Baxter (Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie) travel to Venice, still reeling after the accidental drowning of their daughter Christine. While there, Laura meets a psychic who claims that Christine is still trying to contact them, which she shares with John, who is skeptical. Slowly, John begins to experience supernatural moments and mysterious sightings, some of which appear to be a young girl in a red coat, similar to the one Christine was wearing when she died. While the
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘Moscow On the Hudson’ and ‘Down and Out In Beverly Hills’: A Perfect Double-Feature For July 4th Weekend

If you’re looking for some good movies to watch this three-day holiday weekend, I’d like to suggest a double shot of Paul Mazursky, the under-appreciated filmmaker who died Monday. A whole marathon of his work is in order, really, especially if you’ve never seen Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice or Harry and Tonto or Next Stop, Greenwich Village (come at least for Bill Murray’s first film appearance and a great early Christopher Walken) or An Unmarried Woman (a terrific feminist classic) or the crazy Alex in Wonderland (come at least for the Fellini scene). But two of my favorites are his big releases in the mid-80s, Moscow on the Hudson and Down and Out in Beverly Hills, and I think they make a perfect double feature for Independence Day. First up is Moscow on the Hudson, which in early 1984 led the wave of comedies involving immigration and migration to New York City (see
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »
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