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The Stud (1978)

Fontaine (Dame Joan Collins) is the London wife of Benjamin (Walter Gotell), a wealthy Arab businessman. She spends his money on her nightclub, "The Hobo", and partying. She hires a ... See full summary »

Director:

Quentin Masters

Writers:

Jackie Collins (based on the novel by), Jackie Collins (screenplay by) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Joan Collins ... Fontaine
Oliver Tobias ... Tony / Fontaine's lover
Sue Lloyd ... Vanessa / Fontaine's friend
Mark Burns ... Leonard
Doug Fisher ... Sammy
Walter Gotell ... Benjamin / Fontaine's husband
Tony Allyn Tony Allyn ... Hal
Emma Jacobs Emma Jacobs ... Alex / Fontaine's stepdaughter
Peter Lukas Peter Lukas ... Ian Thane
Natalie Ogle ... Maddy
Constantine Gregory ... Lord Newton (as Constantin De Goguel)
Merlin Ward Merlin Ward ... Peter (as Guy Ward)
Sarah Lawson ... Anne Khaled
Jeremy Child ... Lawyer
Franco De Rosa Franco De Rosa ... Franco / Tony's assistant
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Storyline

Fontaine (Dame Joan Collins) is the London wife of Benjamin (Walter Gotell), a wealthy Arab businessman. She spends his money on her nightclub, "The Hobo", and partying. She hires a handsome manager, Tony (Oliver Tobias), to run her club, but it is understood that his job security is dependent on his satisfying her nymphomaniacal demands. Soon he loses interest in her, as she treats him like a plaything, and turns his attention to her young stepdaughter Alexandra (Emma Jacobs), who uses him to get back at Fontaine after she discovers their video tape having sex in their private elevator, essentially cheating on her father.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

...satisfaction guaranteed See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Dame Joan Collins and Jackie Collins originally wanted Paul Michael Glaser of Starsky and Hutch (1975) fame for this movie's central "Stud" character of Toby Blake. Glaser was committed to that television series and as such could not do this movie. This big part eventually went to Oliver Tobias, who was known at the time for starring in Luke's Kingdom (1976). See more »

Goofs

Felicity Buirski (Deborah) calls herself "Felicity" several times in the dialogue. See more »

Alternate Versions

For the US release, extra disco footage was added. See more »

Connections

Edited into Electric Blue 002 (1981) See more »

Soundtracks

Hark the Herald Angels Sing
(uncredited)
Music by Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy
Arranged by Denis Rycoth (pseudonym of Sidney Torch)
Chappell Recorded Music Library
See more »

User Reviews

 
I bloody love this movie!
15 October 2006 | by simon-118See all my reviews

I can't pretend otherwise, I've always loved this film and it's one of my guilty pleasures for a rainy afternoon, or more likely a night in with a few drinks.

It's astoundingly dreary looking: apart from Joan's soft focus entrance there is precious little opulence on display. The film is low-lit and rather seedy looking. The opening credits sequence remarkably switches from day to night and back again! But right from the start, when the incredibly beautiful Felicity departs after a night with Tony, and then the sequence of him dressing and going out to the sound of the irresistible theme tune (watch Oliver Tobias trying to say "you handsome bastard" tro himself as quietly as possible!), this is a classic quotealong movie. Some of the one liners are great: "they ask for comics and a bag of sweets you give 'em penthouse and amyl nitrate" and best of all "there are two sorts of women in this world. The first sort pick you up and screw you, the second sort pick your brains and screw you up." It's rubbish of course, but however good it may or may not be its about the disco scene and shagging so it will always be seen in that way.

Whatever happened to the director? Oliver Tobias is rather underused in the film it must be said: he doesn't have much to do and is rather overshadowed by super-bitch Fontaine. But the soundtrack is great, and the film is fun. And the scenes with Tony and his pals are the best in the movie. Those three deserved a series! But why does Ben return the video to Fontaine? Surely he'll need it as evidence?


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 September 1979 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Stud See more »

Filming Locations:

London, England, UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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