7.5/10
591
3 user 8 critic

My Way Home (1978)

Not Rated | | Biography, Drama | 1 October 1982 (Sweden)
Jamie leaves the children's home to live with his paternal grandmother. After working in a mine and in a tailor's shop, he is conscripted into the RAF, and goes to Egypt, where he is ... See full summary »

Director:

Bill Douglas

Writer:

Bill Douglas
Reviews
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

My Childhood (1972)
Biography | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

The second part (My ain folk) of Bill Douglas' influential trilogy harks back to his impoverished upbringing in early-'40s Scotland. Cinema was his only escape - he paid for it with the ... See full summary »

Director: Bill Douglas
Stars: Stephen Archibald, Hughie Restorick, Jean Taylor Smith
My Ain Folk (1973)
Biography | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Jamie and Tommy are separated by the death of their grandmother; Jamie with another relative and Tommy to a welfare home. Now Jamie is all alone and his life is not at all happy taken over by silence, rejection and violence.

Director: Bill Douglas
Stars: Stephen Archibald, Hughie Restorick, Jean Taylor Smith
Comrades (1986)
Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

The story of "The Tolpuddle Martyrs". A group of 19th century English farm labourers who formed one of the first trade unions and started a campaign to receive fair wages.

Director: Bill Douglas
Stars: Keith Allen, Dave Atkins, Stephen Bateman
My Way Home (1965)
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

In the final days of WWII, a seventeen-year-old boy wanders the countryside. He is captured by Soviet troops, then released, then captured once more - after he has donned a German uniform ... See full summary »

Director: Miklós Jancsó
Stars: András Kozák, Sergey Nikonenko, Béla Barsi
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Elderly Dastaguir and his newly deaf 5-year-old grandson Yassin hitchhike and walk, but mostly walk, as they make their way to the coal mine where Dastaguir's son Murad works. Dastaguir ... See full summary »

Director: Atiq Rahimi
Stars: Abdul Ghani, Jawan Mard Homayoun, Sher Agah
Xiao Wu (1997)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

Little pocket thief Wu never got away from the streets like his friends did. He realises that he is alone, as his old buddy doesn't invite him for his wedding. When he falls in love with a ... See full summary »

Director: Zhangke Jia
Stars: Hongwei Wang, Hongjian Hao, Baitao Zuo
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

A doomed love between a paper merchant and a courtesan.

Director: Masahiro Shinoda
Stars: Kichiemon Nakamura, Shima Iwashita, Shizue Kawarazaki
Grass (2018)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

In a small Café, Min-hee Kim plays a guest who prefers to observe but not interact with the other guests herself.

Director: Sang-soo Hong
Stars: Min-hee Kim, Joobong Kee, Jae-hong Ahn
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

An elderly, asthmatic filmmaker travels to China, hoping to film the wind.

Director: Joris Ivens
Stars: Joris Ivens, Henxiang Han, Zhuang Liu
I Fidanzati (1963)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Despite his fiancee's reluctance, a young man moves to Sicily for a better job, but soon starts questioning his decision.

Director: Ermanno Olmi
Stars: Anna Canzi, Carlo Cabrini
Platform (2000)
Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

A theatre troupe from rural Fenyang struggles under the decline of communism and rise of popular culture in China in the 1980s.

Director: Zhangke Jia
Stars: Hongwei Wang, Tao Zhao, Jing Dong Liang
Gun Crazy (1950)
Certificate: Passed Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

A well meaning crack shot husband is pressured by his beautiful marksman wife to go on an interstate robbery spree, where he finds out just how depraved and deadly she really is.

Director: Joseph H. Lewis
Stars: John Dall, Peggy Cummins, Berry Kroeger
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Stephen Archibald Stephen Archibald ... Jamie
Paul Kermack Paul Kermack ... Jamie's father
Jessie Combe Jessie Combe ... Father's wife
William Carrol William Carrol ... Their son, Archie
Morag McNee Morag McNee ... Father's girl friend
Lennox Milne Lennox Milne ... Grandmother
Gerald James Gerald James ... Mr. Bridge
Andrew Andrew ... Boy in home
John Young ... Shop assistant
Ian Spowart Ian Spowart ... Schoolboy
Sheila Scott Sheila Scott ... Foster mother
Rebecca Haddick Rebecca Haddick ... Salvation Army woman
Archie Archie ... Down and out
Joseph Blatchley Joseph Blatchley ... Robert
Radir Radir ... Egyptian boy
Edit

Storyline

Jamie leaves the children's home to live with his paternal grandmother. After working in a mine and in a tailor's shop, he is conscripted into the RAF, and goes to Egypt, where he is befriended by Robert, whose undemanding companionship releases Jamie from self-pity.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 October 1982 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

Mon retour See more »

Filming Locations:

Edinburgh, Scotland, UK See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Bill Douglas delayed making this final part of his autobiographical trilogy until 'Stephen Archibald (I)' was old enough to play Jamie in the Egyptian National Service scenes. See more »

Quotes

Jamie: [crying] If I run or walk, it doesn't make any difference. It always comes to the same thing at the end.
See more »

Connections

Follows My Childhood (1972) See more »

Soundtracks

'I Know That My Redeemer Liveth
(uncredited)
from "The Messiah: Part III, 45. Air for Soprano"
Written by George Frideric Handel (as Georg Frederic Handel)
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Great
6 July 2004 | by galensaysyesSee all my reviews

I'd never heard of this or the first two parts ("My Childhood" and "My Ain Folk") of the trilogy it concludes. I wonder why, because taken together they seemed to me one of the best films I'd ever seen--the more so that they're not the type of film I usually seek out or enjoy. Even while watching them, I kept intending to switch them off, but they were so good, I couldn't. At first they looked like nothing new: in style and technique (e.g. the deliberately reflective pace of the editing), they very much resemble low-budget art films circa 1960. And I couldn't always figure out what was going on--which relatives lived where, or how the character got to where he was.

Even the final panning shot of this film, though I ran it a couple of times over, I don't understand; it seemed right, I just didn't know exactly what I was supposed to be looking at. But against all of this was the almost painful clarity and believability of the work as a whole. It has no dramatic structure to rely on, and really no need of it, because all of it clearly derives from the structure of the creator's own life. Only someone who had experienced it and remembered how the experience looked and felt could have re-created it so vividly: sliding down the slag heap, sitting watching grandmother in her chair, careering up the stairs of the boarding school, each detail of each vignette. It struck me especially that although the child is as mute as children usually are in art films, he isn't the under-characterized, under-feeling icon child characters are generally made into; he's a child who would be (and probably was) mute, but he seems real. And unlike most victims in films, who are usually pawns in the conveying of some political message or simple sentiment, he's shown as actually living his life, even at the worst, e.g. when, and after, he's severely beaten. The tale is told in vignettes, but they make up the impression of a life, not a synthetic melodrama.

One detail I found interesting is the absence--one might almost conclude, the stunting--of any sexual interest; at one point the boy stares at a woman's legs, but almost at once--and significantly, I think--he raises his eyes to her unhappy face, which is turned away from him; the only gentleness, and almost the only human contact, he meets with, he gets from two men who both seem to be understood as homosexual, though no special emphasis is attached to this; it's just one detail of many, all intense with meaning, all of interest: e.g. the landscapes of the desperately poor mining neighborhood having almost the look of a fantastic realm, like something out of Mervyn Peake--as a child would see them; and the grandmother in all her contrary, incomprehensible moods--again, as they impress a child. We all forget, we stop seeing and feeling, we put the unassimilable complexities as far away from us as we can, because they keep us the children who have no power of them; but this director hadn't forgotten, he'd clung to them, and labored, obviously, to knead them together into this great, triune film. It's one of those I can well understand other people's disliking or dismissing, but after which dislike or dismissal I wouldn't be discussing films with them any more; I'd feel I owed that much loyalty to a work like this for what it gives.


30 of 30 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 3 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed