A film account and presentation of the final concert of The Band.

Director:

Martin Scorsese

Writer:

Mardik Martin (treatment)
3 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
The Band ... Themselves
Rick Danko Rick Danko ... Self - Bass / Violin / Vocal
Levon Helm ... Self - Drums / Mandolin / Vocal
Garth Hudson ... Self - Organ / Accordion / Saxophone / Synthesizers
Richard Manuel ... Self - Piano / Keyboards / Drums / Vocal
Robbie Robertson ... Self - Guitar / Vocal
Eric Clapton ... Self - Performer
Neil Diamond ... Self - Performer
Bob Dylan ... Self - Performer
Joni Mitchell ... Self - Performer
Neil Young ... Self - Performer
Emmylou Harris ... Self - Performer
Ringo Starr ... Self - Performer
Paul Butterfield ... Self - Performer
Dr. John ... Self - Performer
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Storyline

Thanksgiving, 1976, San Francisco's Winterland: the Band performs its last concert after 16 years on the road. Some numbers they do alone, some songs include guest artists from Ronnie Hawkins (their first boss, when they were the Hawks) to Bob Dylan (their last, when as his backup and as a solo group, they came into their own). Scorsese's camera explores the interactions onstage in the making of music. Offstage, he interviews the Band's five members, focusing on the nature of life on the road. The friendships, the harmonies, the hijinks, and the wear and tear add up to a last waltz. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

It Started as a Concert. It Became a Celebration. [original theatrical] See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Levon Helm states in "This Wheel's On Fire" that Garth Hudson appears so eccentric in his oddly woozy interview because Martin Scorsese showed up to interview him, unannounced, at 6:00 am. See more »

Goofs

During Garth Hudson's solo in the song "Stagefright", the entire song cuts forward approximately 25 seconds. See more »

Quotes

Robbie Robertson - Guitar: It's not like it used to be.
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Crazy Credits

During the United Artists opening logo the sound of the filmmakers getting ready to shoot the first sequence of the film (Rick Danko playing pool, which it leads right into) can be heard. See more »

Alternate Versions

The DVD features an outtake of the jam session onstage towards the end of the concert. See more »


Soundtracks

I Shall Be Released
Written by Bob Dylan
Performed by Ringo Starr, Ronnie Wood And All with The Band
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User Reviews

Glare of the Spotlight
11 January 2005 | by catchick37See all my reviews

This movie was only a name to me until I saw it last year. Immediately, I was riveted by everything about it. I've always been a casual fan of The Band, and of Levon Helm in particular. However, I'd never been bowled over by Bob Dylan, except as a songwriter, so much of The Band's work remained unknown to me as well. I wouldn't say I've become a rabid fan, but I am much more interested in their work, now.

It's a Scorsese film--how could it not be beautifully photographed, but Scorsese managed a difficult feat: he keeps himself out of the movie, except as interviewer during those sequences. This is not really Scorese's vision of a rock concert. It happened mostly organically, certainly with mistakes, gaffes and grit. This is part of its charm.

There are better singers than the guys in The Band, but few better musicians. This can be illustrated with Robbie Robertson in the Clapton song: Clapton's guitar strap comes off and Robertson, with one beat, picks right up on the solo. It looked planned, but wasn't. Joni Mitchell was notoriously hard to back up, due to her original guitar tuning, and ragged song phrasing, but bassist Rick Danko fills in every space with intricate bass figuring.

Perhaps we have become too accustomed to the overwrought, over-hyped, overproduced, overexposed, shiny gack that passes for popular music to appreciate the raw, the imperfect, the sheer humanness of this music. Scorsese shows it all. The guys in The Band were largely worn out and sometimes strung out in the interviews. They are tired, scrawny, empty-eyed from the excesses of the road. Rick Danko is hovering on the ragged edge, as his band is dissolved, and he says his goal is to "keep busy." Richard Manuel looks lost as he says "I just want to break even." These are two musicians who desperately needed the music, but who were murdered by the road. We see their bleak destinies in their eyes in this film.

It is bittersweet certainly, but also a moment in time, crystallized into something great by the music, the love of friends, the willingness of the director to simply stand back and allow the music to happen. It also reminds us what good music used to sound like and makes me wish could exist again.


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Details

Official Sites:

MGM

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Middle English

Release Date:

26 April 1978 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Super Jam See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$16,151, 7 April 2002

Gross USA:

$322,313

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$340,687
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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