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Kiss Meets the Phantom of the Park (1978)

KISS, a rock band made up of superheroes, battles an evil inventor who has plans for destruction at a California amusement park.

Director:

Gordon Hessler

Writers:

Jan Michael Sherman (as Jan-Michael Sherman), Don Buday
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Peter Criss ... Cat Man
Ace Frehley ... Space Ace
Gene Simmons ... The Demon
Paul Stanley ... Star Child
Anthony Zerbe ... Abner Devereaux
Carmine Caridi ... Calvin Richards
Deborah Ryan ... Melissa
John Dennis Johnston ... Chopper
John Lisbon Wood John Lisbon Wood ... Slime
Lisa Jane Persky ... Dirty Dee
John Chappell John Chappell ... Snede
Terry Lester ... Sam
Don Steele ... Self
Richard Hein Richard Hein ... Guard
Brion James ... Guard
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Storyline

The tale of rock band KISS and their efforts to thwart a diabolical plan by mad scientist Abner Devereaux. Devereaux has found a way to clone humans into robots in his laboratory at an amusement park. It just so happens that he plans to uses the KISS concert as a platform to unleash his plan on the world. KISS must use their special powers to stop him. Written by Josh Pasnak <chainsaw@intouch.bc.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

KISSterical! KISStounding! KISStoric! See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The biker character Chopper wears a "Satan's Mothers" biker patch on his vest. This patch is the same one used for the gang of the same name in The Warriors (1979). See more »

Goofs

When Star Child finds the electrode on Sam's neck, a close-up of Paul's hand clearly shows a wedding ring mark. See more »

Quotes

Star Child: We've got to find Devereaux.
Cat Man: That's good with me, Star Child. I'm down to my last few lives.
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Alternate Versions

The Spanish version of "KISS Meets The Phantom of the Park" (usually known as "Attack of the Phantoms") has totally different editing. Many various scenes/elements not in the US version (while many in the US version are not in the Spanish version). Among of the differences are:
  • Devereaux's Civil War robots are seen attacking the security guard's office.
  • Calvin and Devereaux have a discussion on the Magic Mountain monorail and continue it as they get off the ride.
  • There are additional live shots of KISS, including some from overhead, including one where you can clearly see a cameraman on stage.
  • KISS' promotional videos from 1979, "I Was Made For Loving You" and "Sure Know Something," from their "Dynasty" album, are inserted in the movie as live concert performances, despite the completely different costumes and staging from the previous shot before the songs begin.
  • The entire movie uses different music, especially a lot of KISS solo album music, and even a little bit of an instrumental of KISS' "Almost Human."
  • Paul Stanley shoots Sam's remote control with his eye laser. In the US version, he simply takes it out of Sam's skin with his hand.
  • There are additional shots during most of the KISS fight scenes, as well as many quick scenes throughout the film. Just one example of many, the guy staring at Melissa at the snack bar wipes the table with his hand, while in the US version he does not.
  • This version ends with a shot of Devereaux walking in the park (the scene after Calvin fired him) and then going into the credits which scroll, while the US version ends with KISS performing "God of Thunder."
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Connections

References The Wolf Man (1941) See more »

Soundtracks

Man of 1000 Faces
Composed by Gene Simmons
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User Reviews

The "Citizen Kane" of Generation X
7 March 2003 | by pjbickelSee all my reviews

I'm going to assume that you, the reader, have already been privileged enough to view this masterpiece. Most likely, like most of the world's population, you have seen it multiple times and probably own your own copy, as I do. I will also go out on a limb and assume that you are aware of Gene Simmons' acting chops. They speak for themselves. Here we see a master thespian at the peak of his craft, eliciting emotions and feelings as only one as trained and skilled as he can do. Assuming you already know these things, I will spare you intricate plot details and my hypothesis on all of the metaphors and double-entendres that exist in this cinematic celluloid achievement. What we've got here is a cultural landmark the likes of which may not be fully understood for centuries to come. Like "Riding With Death" and Steven Speilberg's "2001: A Space Odyssey" before it, "KISS Meets a Phantom in a Park (1978) (TV)" asks questions of the mind, heart, body and soul. Where Speilberg failed, George Lucas succeeds with this film, his directorial debut. And what a stellar debut it is. Originally titled "KISS in Attack of the Phantom", Lucas wisely retitled the film due to his imminent release 20 years later of the similarly titled films "Attack of the Clones" and "The Phantom Menace". Whatever title he chose, "KISS Meets the Phantom in a Park (1978) (TV)" surpasses those two films by leaps and bounds, and indeed is even vastly superior to the 1982 original "Star Wars". Though released in (1978) for (TV), the special effects and brilliant stunt work were far ahead of their time and truly belonged on the big screen. Only with `The Star Wars Holiday Special' and perhaps "Corvette Summer" would Lucas come close to the greatness he ultimately captured in "KISS in KISS Meets a Phantom in a Park Who Attacks Them (1978) (TV)". Sadly, he would never approach that level of mastery again, though some (myself included) would argue that his Executive Producer credit on "Glitter" should have earned him an Oscar. To sum up, an overall brilliant film, utterly bereft of flaws. A timeless and intriguing piece of work that to this day does not fail to frighten, educate, thrill, and provoke thought. This is the quintessential Rock and/or Roll film that writer/director/star Kevin Costner tried to bring to fruition in his half-baked, ill-fated, ill-received 1984 film `Pink Floyd: The Wall'. Costner failed, and failed miserably. Of course he would go on to make some of the best short films of all time, including `Waterworld' and `The Postman', but neither he, nor anyone else would ever attempt again to match the glory, mystique and power of the film that is `KISS Star in a Phantom Meeting In The Park (TV) (1978)'.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 October 1978 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Kiss Meets the Phantom See more »

Filming Locations:

Santa Clarita, California, USA See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (theatrical)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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