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Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1980s: Jessica Lange, Olympia Dukakis, Dianne Wiest … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1980s: Jessica Lange, Olympia Dukakis, Dianne Wiest … ? [Poll]
The Best Supporting Actress Oscar winners of the 1980s include both well-known leading ladies and beloved veteran actresses. The decade saw stars like Jessica Lange, Geena Davis and Anjelica Huston earn their Oscars, joining Mary Steenburgen, Dianne Wiest, Linda Hunt, Olympia Dukakis and Brenda Fricker, who have all had solid careers since their wins. The decade also has two winning actresses that have since died, Maureen Stapleton and Peggy Ashcroft, though their performances will not be forgotten.

Who is your favorite Best Supporting Actress winner of the 1980s? Look back on each and vote in our poll below.

Mary Steenburgen, “Melvin and Howard” (1980) — The decade started off with Steenburgen winning her Oscar for “Melvin and Howard,” about Melvin Dummar (Paul Le Mat), who claimed to be the heir of Howard Hughes‘ fortune. Steenburgen plays Lynda, Melvin’s wife who takes up stripping and is frustrated by Melvin’s behavior. This
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of the 1980s: Meryl Streep, Katharine Hepburn, Cher … ? [Poll]
The 1980s saw several legendary dames winning Best Actress at the Oscars, including academy favorites like Katharine Hepburn and Meryl Streep. The entire decade was a good one for women dominating their films, like Sissy Spacek, Shirley MacLaine, Sally Field, Geraldine Page, Cher and Jodie Foster. The ’80s also set records that still stand today, with Marlee Matlin being the youngest Best Actress winner at age 21 and Jessica Tandy being the oldest winner at 80.

So which Best Actress winner from the ’80s is your favorite? Look back on each of their performances and vote in our poll below.

Sissy Spacek, “Coal Miner’s Daughter” (1980) — The ’80s began with Spacek earning her Oscar for playing country music star Loretta Lynn in the biopic “Coal Miner’s Daughter.” Spacek earned a previous nomination for “Carrie” (1976) and four subsequent nominations, for: “Missing” (1982), “The River” (1984), “Crimes of the Heart” (1986) and “In the Bedroom” (2001).

SEE
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition
This article marks Part 2 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

In 1978, Meryl Streep, already renowned for her work on the New York stage, grabbed the attention of moviegoers across the country with her Oscar-nominated turn in the Best Picture champ “The Deer Hunter.” That year, however, would seem minor in comparison to what was on the horizon in 1979.

Streep was about to work with three of the decade’s hottest directors – Woody Allen, at his most in-demand after “Annie Hall” (1977) and “Interiors” (1978); Robert Benton, whose “The Late Show” (1977) was a big hit; and Jerry Schatzberg, who won critical acclaim with “The Panic in Needle Park” (1971) and “Scarecrow” (1973).

The resulting trio of Allen’s “Manhattan,” Benton’s “Kramer vs.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Diane Keaton Defends Woody Allen: ‘I Continue to Believe Him’

Diane Keaton Defends Woody Allen: ‘I Continue to Believe Him’
As stars continue to distance themselves from Woody Allen, the director has found a staunch ally in Diane Keaton.

“Woody Allen is my friend and I continue to believe him. It might be of interest to take a look at the ’60 Minute’ interview from 1992 and see what you think,” she tweeted, linking to the interview with Steve Kroft in which Allen discussed the allegations waged against him by his adopted daughter, Dylan Farrow. Farrow has accused Allen of sexually assaulting her in 1992 when she was seven years old, though he has never been charged. Keaton has starred in a number of Allen’s films, including “Annie Hall,” “Interiors,” and “Manhattan.”

Woody Allen is my friend and I continue to believe him. It might be of interest to take a look at the 60 Minute interview from 1992 and see what you think. https://t.co/QVQIUxImB1

— Diane Keaton (@Diane_Keaton) January 29, 2018

The allegations against Allen regained national prominence in the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Meryl Streep in ‘The Deer Hunter’: A look back at her first Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The Deer Hunter’: A look back at her first Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 1 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

Prior to 1978, Meryl Streep was best-known for her acclaimed New York stage work. She made five Broadway appearances between 1975 and 1977, including a turn in “A Memory of Two Mondays/27 Wagons Full of Cotton” (1976) that brought Streep her first – and to date, only – Tony Award nomination. Her sole big screen appearance was a small, albeit memorable, turn opposite Jane Fonda in “Julia” (1977).

Streep’s name recognition increased significantly in 1978. First, there was her much-heralded performance in the epic NBC miniseries “Holocaust” that resulted in an Emmy Award. It was her second-ever appearance in a feature film, however – and in a Best Picture Academy Awards winner, no
See full article at Gold Derby »

Canon Of Film: ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors’

In this week’s edition of Canon Of Film, we take a look at one of Woody Allen‘s most popular films, ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors’. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

Crimes And Misdemeanors (1989)

Director/Screenwriter: Woody Allen

Part dark tragedy, part dark comedy, or is it all comedy? It’s certainly all dark to say the least. Considered by almost everybody as one of Woody Allen’s very best films (although I’m not sure Woody would agree), ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors’, wasn’t his first dramatic film, that was the Ingmar Bergman-esque ‘Interiors,’ and it certainly wasn’t his last comedy, yet it clearly represents the moment in Allen’s career when he started to abandon comedy in favor of drama and tragedy. Well, maybe “abandon,” is the wrong word, but he certainly began to lose interest in comedy around here.
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers

79 Movies to See Before You Die, According to the Dardenne Brothers
Any list of the greatest foreign directors currently working today has to include Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The directors first rose to prominence in the mid 1990s with efforts like “The Promise” and “Rosetta,” and they’ve continued to excel in the 21st century with titles such as “The Kid With A Bike” and “Two Days One Night,” which earned Marion Cotillard a Best Actress Oscar nomination.

Read MoreThe Dardenne Brothers’ Next Film Will Be a Terrorism Drama

The directors will be back in U.S. theaters with the release of “The Unknown Girl” on September 8, which is a long time coming considering the film first premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in 2016. While you continue to wait for their new movie, the brothers have provided their definitive list of 79 movies from the 20th century that you must see. La Cinetek published the list in full and is hosting many
See full article at Indiewire »

5 Lessons For Actresses from Diane Keaton’s AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute

5 Lessons For Actresses from Diane Keaton’s AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute
When Diane Keaton accepted the 45th AFI Life Achievement Award from Woody Allen in Hollywood Thursday night, it was the end of one of the more memorable AFI tributes. And as one actress after another explained why Keaton was such a significant role model — from Oscar-winners Emma Stone, Reese Witherspoon (Keaton-directed TV movie “Wildflower”) and Meryl Streep (“Marvin’s Room”) to Rachel McAdams (“The Family Stone”) and comedienne Lisa Kudrow (“Hanging Up”) — it struck me that all actresses should pay attention to why Keaton is so admired and emulated.

Here are some wise lessons to be learned from the star of “Play It Again Sam,” “The First Wives Club,” “Crimes of the Heart,” “Shoot the Moon,” and HBO’s “The Young Pope.”

1. Stay single.

Keaton launched her Hollywood career with the day-long wedding scene in “The Godfather,” at the end of which she and fellow theater outsider Al Pacino proceeded to get royally drunk.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

5 Lessons For Actresses from Diane Keaton’s AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute

5 Lessons For Actresses from Diane Keaton’s AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute
When Diane Keaton accepted the 45th AFI Life Achievement Award from Woody Allen in Hollywood Thursday night, it was the end of one of the more memorable AFI tributes. And as one actress after another explained why Keaton was such a significant role model — from Oscar-winners Emma Stone, Reese Witherspoon (Keaton-directed TV movie “Wildflower”) and Meryl Streep (“Marvin’s Room”) to Rachel McAdams (“The Family Stone”) and comedienne Lisa Kudrow (“Hanging Up”) — it struck me that all actresses should pay attention to why Keaton is so admired and emulated.

Here are some wise lessons to be learned from the star of “Play It Again Sam,” “The First Wives Club,” “Crimes of the Heart,” “Shoot the Moon,” and HBO’s “The Young Pope.”

1. Stay single.

Keaton launched her Hollywood career with the day-long wedding scene in “The Godfather,” at the end of which she and fellow theater outsider Al Pacino proceeded to get royally drunk.
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Woody Allen's "Interiors" (1978); Blu-ray Release From Twilight Time

  • CinemaRetro
“A Long Day’S Journey Into A Little Night Silence”

By Raymond Benson

Woody’s Allen’s first dramatic feature film, Interiors, released in 1978 on the heels of his hugely successful and Oscar-winning masterpiece, Annie Hall, was met with praise by some and head-scratching by others. Most critics, however, acknowledged that the picture was a step the artist needed to take in his evolution as a filmmaker.

Prior to Annie Hall, Allen’s films were zany comedies—the “early funny ones,” as facetiously described in a later work, Stardust Memories. Beginning with Annie, Allen made a quantum leap forward in originality, confidence, and stylistic maturity. He reinvented the romantic comedy. In many ways, Annie Hall is a movie with a European sensibility. It could be argued that Allen’s body of work post-Annie resembles the kind of material made by a director like, say, Francois Truffaut—small, well-written, intimate gems about people,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

When Maureen Stapleton Became Our Grandmother Forever

35 years ago, the actress sang the body electric.

The handful of actresses I associate with motherhood include ’80s movie and TV staples Dee Wallace, Teri Garr, Melinda Dillon, Joanna Kerns, Judith Light, and Meredith Baxter. They were the ones that comforted me when I was a kid. But when it comes to images of grandmothers, only one woman comes to mind: Maureen Stapleton.

On January 17, 1982, Stapleton was only 55 years old. She had three Academy Award nominations under her belt and was about to receive her fourth. She would win that Oscar for Best Supporting Actress at the end of March for her performance as Emma Goldman in Reds. But on this particular night, she was on television in the title role of The Electric Grandmother.

The Emmy-nominated NBC special, part of the network’s Peacock Theatre, was co-written by Ray Bradbury based on his 1962 Twilight Zone episode “I Sing the Body Electric,” the
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Review: Woody Allen's "Stardust Memories" (1980); Twilight Time Blu-ray Limited Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“Allen’S 9-1/2”

By Raymond Benson

If one facetiously counted the number of films Woody Allen made beginning in 1969 and throughout the 70s, there would be eight that he wrote and directed (seven of which he also starred in), plus a movie that he only wrote and starred in—Play It Again, Sam, for which I’ll count as 1/2, making Stardust Memories number 9-1/2. Appropriately, this film seems to intentionally pay homage to Federico Fellini’s own masterwork, 8-1/2 (1963), which was about a filmmaker who didn’t know what movie he wanted to shoot next. Stardust Memories, released in 1980 after the huge successes of Annie Hall and Manhattan (with critically-acclaimed Interiors in-between), is also about a filmmaker in search of the picture he wants to make.

It wasn’t well-received at the time. I recall leaving the theater in anger. How could Woody be so contemptuous of his audience? It was as if his character,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Links: Nate Parker, Ben-Hur, and Donald Trump as Film Critic

Variety Amber Heard donates her entire divorce settlement from Johnny Depp to charity

Pajiba ... she also apparently passed on receiving residuals from his movies

Monkey See funny talk about the new Ben-Hur and the long shadow of its 1959 Best Picture predecessor

Kenneth in the (212) alerts us to a new webseries on Woody Allen movies. 10 things about Interiors this time 

Olympic play, Nate Parker controversy, and Donald Trump as movie critic after the jump...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Michael Cimino & the Best Director Oscar Since

Eric here with thinking about the past 40 years of Oscars Best Director category.

This past Saturday, director Michael Cimino passed away at age 77. Cimino won the Best Director Oscar for 1978’s The Deer Hunter, beating Woody Allen (Interiors), Hal Ashby (Coming Home), Warren Beatty and Buck Henry (Heaven Can Wait), and Alan Parker (Midnight Express). While those five actual films are of varying quality, the names behind them are all heavyweights and it was formidable company.

The Deer Hunter was a divisive film upon its release and remains so today (praised for its leisurely-paced first half and its capture of inexpressive male friendship; criticized for the Russian Roulette melodrama and its depiction of the Vietnamese). With The Deer Hunter, Cimino aimed to make something epic and classically Greek in its storytelling, and watching the film you can actually feel his young talent. Cimino next famously (infamously?) went on to direct 1980’s Heaven’s Gate,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Queen of Earth review – pungent chamber piece of simmering envy

Elisabeth Moss and Katherine Waterston play a pair of friends locked in a dysfunctional relationship poisoned by resentment

Alex Ross Perry’s Queen of Earth drags the fingernails of its emotional pain down the blackboard. The atmosphere crackles with resentment: this film is exclusively and rather bafflingly populated by people who dislike each other intensely – even, or especially, people who are supposed to like each other.

It is a pungent chamber piece, starring Elisabeth Moss and Katherine Waterston, shot almost entirely in closeup, about two women locked in a dysfunctional friendship that has long ago been poisoned by competitive envy and resentment. Like Perry’s previous movie, Listen Up Philip, this is a film about unbearably entitled people, and once again there are Woody Allen influences, but no comedy now. This is the world of Interiors and the late-70s Allen’s interface with Bergman.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Will Golden Globes embrace Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu ('The Revenant') after spurning him for 'Birdman'?

Nobody has ever won a Golden Globe for directing the year after losing here and then going on to win at the Oscars. Will Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, who contends for “The Revenant,” be able to do what even Woody Allen could not? -Break- Subscribe to Gold Derby Breaking News Alerts & Experts’ Latest Oscar Predictions In 1977 Allen was nominated for four Golden Globes for “Annie Hall”: Best Comedy/Musical Picture, Comedy/Musical Actor, Best Director, and Best Screenplay. He did not have a great night losing all four races and having to find solace in Diane Keaton winning Best Comedy/Musical Actress. A couple of months later he would have a great night at the Oscars when “Annie Hall” won Best Picture, Best Director and Best Original Screenplay (as well as a trophy for Keaton). In 1978 Allen returned to the Globes with “Interiors.” However, he lost Best Director to Michael Cimino
See full article at Gold Derby »

Review: Alex Ross Perry's Chilling, Intense 'Queen Of Earth' Starring Elisabeth Moss & Katherine Waterston

A striking 180 degree turn that demonstrates a sharp versatility and impressive command of multiple forms, filmmaker Alex Ross Perry’s latest effort, “Queen Of Earth,” is a mysterious and moody examination of complex personal dynamics, co-dependency, poisoned perceptions, and the fragile, thin line between friendship and hateship. A marked departure from his last effort, the talky, caustically funny “Listen Up Philip,” Perry’s fourth feature-length effort is a chilly and claustrophobic chamber drama akin to works of Ingmar Bergman, but with paranoid psychodrama notes worthy of Roman Polanski. It’s like Woody Allen following up the amusing “Annie Hall” with the cold and distancing “Interiors.” But the movie’s emotional turbulence, resentful hostilities, and considerations of privilege, self-absorption, and narcissism are also pure Alex Ross Perry. Set completely within the confines of an idyllic lake house upstate, the film centers on the quickly curdling friendship between two...
See full article at The Playlist »

Close-Up on "Two Lovers": James Gray's Extraordinary Average Love Story

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Two Lovers is playing on Mubi in the Us through September 15.Little Odessa (1994), The Yards (2000), We Own the Night (2007), The Immigrant (2013): Written and directed by James Gray, these four films are occupied by characters living extraordinary lives. Yet despite their depiction of an exceptional existence—covering cold-blooded killers, cunning gangsters, ruthless hit men, and the perilous plight of early 20th century immigrants—Gray's cinematic worlds are consistently unassuming and relatable. No matter how high the drama or how dire the circumstances, there is a palpable attention to detail, in character and setting, which attains a surprising level of modest believability. Two Lovers (2009), his fourth feature film, likewise achieves this authenticity, but it is also something of an exemption to his body of work. Anchored by Joaquin Phoenix as Leonard Kraditor, in what was the actor's third straight film
See full article at MUBI »
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