I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978) - News Poster

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Drive-In Dust Offs: Superstition (1982)

Shelf sitters aren’t always bad news in my eyes; take for instance Superstition (1982). This Canadian curiosity was filmed in ’81, released abroad in ’82, and finally washed ashore in North America in early ’85; it is by turns goofy, gory, dumb, and creative in its kills, and is a great addition to a sub-genre I’m just going to call Italiadjacent, where films from this side of the pond look to that side for aesthetical inspiration and end up with nonsensical storylines. And while Superstition tries to keep it together, it can’t help but let loose and summon up its inner Argento from time to time.

Also known as The Witch, Superstition was part of the U.K.’s notorious early ‘80s Video Nasties scene, but landed on the non-prosecutable Section 3 list, which I guess were films still really bad for you, but not “go to jail” bad for renting or selling them.
See full article at DailyDead »

A Century of Female Fandom

Same stereotypes, different name.

If you look at the shining beacon of humanity that is Urban Dictionary, you will find fanboy defined as “a passionate fan of various elements of geek culture (e.g. sci-fi, comics, Star Wars, video games, anime, hobbits, Magic: the Gathering, etc.), but who lets his passion override social graces.”

What about fangirl? “A rabid breed of human female who is obsessed with either a fictional character or an actor.”

While the former isn’t exactly an endorsement, the latter is a whole different category of harsh — and might have well been ripped from a newspaper written a hundred years ago. Because despite what this 2009 Today article or this 2012 Time article would suggest, calling women the “new” face of fandom is inaccurate. They’ve been there all along. The movie fangirl stereotype is almost as old as the movies — certainly older than their fanboy counterpart. As described by Diana Anselmo-Sequeira in her
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Watch a Pair of Early Short Films From Robert Zemeckis

It’s strange to use the word “under-appreciated” when it comes to the director behind such hits as Back to the Future, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Contact, Cast Away, and Forrest Gump, but in today’s Hollywood it feels like Robert Zemeckis‘ talents are often overlooked. His eye for composition and structure scene-by-scene is remarkable in his recent return to live-action and certainly the case when it comes to his Allied, which is more entertaining than most of its awards-fare brethren.

With the release of his World War II thriller, it’s time to take a look back at his early directorial eye when he was at USC with two short films. The first is 1972’s The Lift, featuring black-and-white photography and a jazzy score as we follow a man’s bout with machinery. Playing with shadows and close-ups in tight quarters, it shows off a 20-year-old Zemeckis’ control of the camera,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Review: Allied, In the Territory Between Tribute and Parody

A ripe potboiler, Allied resembles countless World War II motion pictures, yet its intended tone is difficult to discern. Is it meant as a tribute? Or a parody? The answer lies somewhere between the two, obviously, for a movie that includes a childbirth scene -- outdoors, at night -- as London is bombed by the Nazis and an orchestral score soars. The exploding bombs light up the skies like fireworks! The actors look glamorous! How could anyone take that seriously? Director Robert Zemeckis has been mapping the territory between sincerity and cynicism for much of his career. His first two films, I Wanna Hold Your Hand and Used Cars, flopped neatly from one extreme to the other, a pattern that has trailed him for years,...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Brad Pitt & Marion Cotillard Are ‘Allied’ In Robert Zemeckis’ Engaging, Frustrating WWII Spy Romance [Review]

Robert Zemeckis has, at the very least, had a fascinating career. Starting off with writing 1978’s teen pic “I Wanna Hold Your Hand,” he became a Spielberg protege, directing a number of big blockbusters, including one of the most beloved of all time, “Back To The Future.” Then he switched into more prestige-y fare in the 1990s with the Oscar-winning “Forrest Gump” and the less adored, but less stodgy “Contact.” Then he spent the 2000s abandoning reality altogether with a series of performance-capture CGI animations that often felt more like theme park rides than actual movies.

Continue reading Brad Pitt & Marion Cotillard Are ‘Allied’ In Robert Zemeckis’ Engaging, Frustrating WWII Spy Romance [Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Film Review: History & Pure Fun in ‘The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years’

Chicago – They were the greatest show on earth, for what it was worth. But what they also were was one of the most fascinating show business stories in history. Director Ron Howard encapsulates John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr during their initial meteoric rise in the descriptively titled ‘The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years.’

Rating: 5.0/5.0

The Beatles history, in ten short years, continues to intrigue and delight rock music scholars and admirers. Ron Howard does a spectacular job of focusing on three crucial years, the years that The Beatles were a traveling road show. Beginning with their conquering of America in February of 1964, through their last organized live concert in San Francisco on August 29th, 1966, the four boys in the band became men, and faced a tsunami of adoration, backlash, surreality and collective joy. This is a love fest by Ron Howard, dedicated
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Theresa Saldana, Raging Bull and The Commish Actress, Dies at 61

Theresa Saldana, Raging Bull and  The Commish Actress, Dies at 61
Actress Theresa Saldana, known for her roles in Raging Bull and The Commish, died Monday in Los Angeles. She was 61.

According to Reuters, Saldana had been hospitalized at Cedars-Sinai, but the cause of death has yet to be disclosed.

While Saldana was famous for her work on screen, the actress was perhaps best known for her advocacy of victims' rights after she survived a near-fatal attack by a stalker in 1982. She founded the Victims for Victims organization that was dedicated to fighting for anti-stalking laws. She then played herself in a film about her attack and advocacy work.

Painful to
See full article at People.com - TV Watch »

Theresa Saldana, Raging Bull and The Commish Actress, Dies at 61

  • PEOPLE.com
Theresa Saldana, Raging Bull and  The Commish Actress, Dies at 61
Actress Theresa Saldana, known for her roles in Raging Bull and The Commish, died Monday in Los Angeles. She was 61. According to Reuters, Saldana had been hospitalized at Cedars-Sinai, but the cause of death has yet to be disclosed. While Saldana was famous for her work on screen, the actress was perhaps best known for her advocacy of victims' rights after she survived a near-fatal attack by a stalker in 1982. She founded the Victims for Victims organization that was dedicated to fighting for anti-stalking laws. She then played herself in a film about her attack and advocacy work. Painful to
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Theresa Saldana, Raging Bull and The Commish Actress, Dies at 61

  • PEOPLE.com
Theresa Saldana, Raging Bull and  The Commish Actress, Dies at 61
Actress Theresa Saldana, known for her roles in Raging Bull and The Commish, died Monday in Los Angeles. She was 61. According to Reuters, Saldana had been hospitalized at Cedars-Sinai, but the cause of death has yet to be disclosed. While Saldana was famous for her work on screen, the actress was perhaps best known for her advocacy of victims' rights after she survived a near-fatal attack by a stalker in 1982. She founded the Victims for Victims organization that was dedicated to fighting for anti-stalking laws. She then played herself in a film about her attack and advocacy work. Painful to
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Theresa Saldana, Star of ‘The Commish’ and ‘Raging Bull,’ Dies at 61

Theresa Saldana, Star of ‘The Commish’ and ‘Raging Bull,’ Dies at 61
Theresa Saldana, known for her role on the early Michael Chiklis series “The Commish” and the Scorsese-De Niro film “Raging Bull,” has died at age 61, Chiklis confirmed via Twitter on Tuesday. “Painful to hear the news of Theresa’s passing. My family & I extend our love, condolences & support to her family in their time of grieving,” Chiklis wrote. Saldana began her onscreen career in the 1978 Robert Zemeckis film “I Wanna Hold Your Hand,” which was a fictional comedy about the impact of Beatlemania. Two years later, Saldana was cast in “Raging Bull” as Lenore Lamotta, the wife of Joe Pesci‘s.
See full article at The Wrap »

Theresa Saldana, ‘Raging Bull’ and ‘The Commish’ Star, Dies at 61

Theresa Saldana, ‘Raging Bull’ and ‘The Commish’ Star, Dies at 61
Theresa Saldana, who starred on “The Commish” and in “Raging Bull” alongside Joe Pesci, died Monday in Los Angeles. She had been hospitalized at Cedars-Sinai but no cause of death has been given. She was 61.

Saldana was best known for having survived a knifing attack by a stalker in 1982. She later went on to do victim advocacy work after her near-death attack. She founded the Victims for Victims organization that fought for anti-stalking laws, then played herself in the 1984 TV movie “Victims for Victims: The Teresa Saldana Story.” Her death was first reported by TMZ.

Saldana starred in multiple films in the ’70s but gained traction when she starred in Robert Zemeckis’ 1978 film “I Wanna Hold your Hand.” She then appeared in “Raging Bull” as the wife of Joey Lamotta, played by Joe Pesci.

Saldana also appeared in TV shows including “T.J. Hooker,” “Cagney & Lacey” and “Simon & Simon.” However, her
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Theresa Saldana, ‘Raging Bull’ and ‘The Commish’ Star, Dies at 61

Theresa Saldana, ‘Raging Bull’ and ‘The Commish’ Star, Dies at 61
Theresa Saldana, who starred on “The Commish” and in “Raging Bull” alongside Joe Pesci, died Monday in Los Angeles. She had been hospitalized at Cedars-Sinai but no cause of death has been given. She was 61.

Saldana was best known for having survived a knifing attack by a stalker in 1982. She later went on to do victim advocacy work after her near-death attack. She founded the Victims for Victims organization that fought for anti-stalking laws, then played herself in the 1984 TV movie “Victims for Victims: The Teresa Saldana Story.” Her death was first reported by TMZ.

Saldana starred in multiple films in the ’70s but gained traction when she starred in Robert Zemeckis’ 1978 film “I Wanna Hold your Hand.” She then appeared in “Raging Bull” as the wife of Joey Lamotta, played by Joe Pesci.

Saldana also appeared in TV shows including “T.J. Hooker,” “Cagney & Lacey” and “Simon & Simon.” However, her
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Back to the Future': 30 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About the Time-Travel Classic

Since its release 30 years ago, "Back to the Future" has been everyone's favorite time-travel movie. It's remained a must-see long enough for Marty McFly's own kids to enjoy it.

Even so, there's much you may not know about the beloved sci-fi comedy, from the unused ideas that popped up in other films, to why there has yet to (thankfully) be a reboot. To celebrate Back to the Future Day (October 21), here are 30 things you need to know about Marty McFly's first trip through time.

"Back to the Future 30th Anniversary Trilogy" is available to own now on Blu-ray & DVD.

1. Director Robert Zemeckis and co-screenwriter Bob Gale (pictured above) tried for years to create a time-travel story. The key came in 1980, when Gale was looking over his father's high school yearbook and wondered whether he and his father would have been friends if they'd both been teenagers at the same time.
See full article at Moviefone »

We Have Arrived at ‘Back to the Future’ Day, But Without Flying Cars

We Have Arrived at ‘Back to the Future’ Day, But Without Flying Cars
On Oct. 21, Universal Home Entertainment will host a red-carpet screening at Lincoln Center of “Back to the Future,” wrapping a week-long celebration tied to the day shown on Marty McFly’s time-machine DeLorean car. It’s a pretty impressive array of activities, considering the movie started out with nobody wanting to make it.

Bob Gale, who scripted the 1985 original with Robert Zemeckis, told Variety this week that they spent years trying to get it made, but most studios thought it was too tame, saying “very nice, very sweet, but take it to Disney.” However, when they finally met with Disney, execs thought it was too racy, nervous about Lorraine’s attraction to Marty McFly (who’s her son, though she doesn’t know it because he’s visiting from the future).

The reason he sets the DeLorean to Oct. 21, 2015? It’s the day 30 years in the future when the Cubs
See full article at Variety - Film News »

NYC Weekend Watch: Robert Zemeckis, ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Working Girl,’ ‘Rabid,’ and More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of Modern Art

With The Walk now playing and expanding next week, “What Lies Beneath: The Films of Robert Zemeckis” looks at its director’s fascinating career. The Beatles-centered I Wanna Hold Your Hand screens on Friday, alongside his short film “The Lift”; the Back to the Future trilogy can be seen this
See full article at The Film Stage »

Ranked: The Films Of Robert Zemeckis

Tiptoeing gingerly into theaters this week, trying not to look down, is “The Walk,” the retelling of Philippe Petit’s incredible high-wire stunt between the twin towers of the World Trade Center in 1974. The story was previously told in the 2008 Oscar-winning documentary “Man On Wire,” but this new film, starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Petit, has something that the previous one didn’t: IMAX 3D technology that puts you in Petit’s shoes to dizzying, pulse-pounding effect, as our review from Nyff revealed. It’s the latest example of director Robert Zemeckis taking state-of-the-art technology and applying it to truly popular entertainment, his stock-in-trade for 35 years now. The writer-director won a Student Academy Award for his USC film, which brought him under the tutelage of Steven Spielberg, who helped him to make his debut feature “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” at the tender age of 26. In the 1980s, Zemeckis became one of Hollywood’s biggest filmmakers,
See full article at The Playlist »

Review: 'The Walk' may be the best use ever of Zemeckis and his VFX wizardry

  • Hitfix
Review: 'The Walk' may be the best use ever of Zemeckis and his VFX wizardry
I knew how it ended before I walked into the theater. After all, I've seen "Man On Wire," and it ended up on my ten best list for 2008, and I know how the story ends. Beyond that, I knew that I was looking at the state-of-the-art of what visual effects could accomplish in the year 2015 and not actual footage of an event in the '70s. Even so, the new Robert Zemeckis film "The Walk" made my hands sweat and my stomach ache for a solid 45 minutes, and I suspect it's going to be a big-screen sensation thanks to people going back to witness it several times. One of the truths of the new age of theatrical distribution is that you have to give an audience a reason to go to a theater and not just wait for a more convenient time and place to see a film. If you
See full article at Hitfix »

'Back to the Future': 30 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About the Time-Travel Classic

Since its release 30 years ago this week (on July 3, 1985), "Back to the Future" has been everyone's favorite time-travel movie. It's remained a must-see long enough for Marty McFly's own kids to enjoy it.

Even so, there's much you may not know about the beloved sci-fi comedy, from the unused ideas that popped up in other films, to why there has yet to (thankfully) be a reboot. To celebrate the film's 30th anniversary, we're firing up the flux capacitor and traveling back 30 years to learn the secrets of "Back to the Future."

1. Director Robert Zemeckis and co-screenwriter Bob Gale (pictured above) tried for years to create a time-travel story. The key came in 1980, when Gale was looking over his father's high school yearbook and wondered whether he and his father would have been friends if they'd both been teenagers at the same time.

2. Zemeckis and Gale took their idea to Steven Spielberg,
See full article at Moviefone »

'American Idol' poll: What's your favorite Jax performance? (Cast your vote)'

According to exclusive Gold Derby predictions, 18-year-old Jax is a frontrunner to win "American Idol" with 8/1 odds. Do you agree or disagree with those odds? Hurry -- make your predictions now and you could win our weekly prize of a $100 Amazon gift certificate. It's fun and easy! -Break- Jax fans, do you have a favorite performance of hers from the live shows? Be sure to sound off in the new poll below, and then cast your votes for whether you think Jax will Win "American Idol" in our predictions center. 'American Idol' poll: What's your favorite Clark Beckham performance? (Cast your vote) As a refresher, Jax sang a live version of her audition song "I Wanna Hold Your Hand" for Back to the Start Week. She then performed "Blank Space" for Party Songs Week, "Grow Old With You" for Movie Songs Week, "You Give Love a Bad Name
See full article at Gold Derby »

Recap: 'American Idol' Season 14 - Top 12 Revealed

  • Hitfix
Recap: 'American Idol' Season 14 - Top 12 Revealed
There were definitely some surprises in last week's first Top 24 eliminations. One week, Trevor Douglas was my pick to win the whole thing. The next week? Poof. Gone. One week, it seemed like everybody hated Maddie Walker for taking Rachael Hallack's place in the Top 24. The next week? Bam! Embraced by America despite an utterly mediocre performance. On Wednesday (March 11) night, "American Idol" is unveiling our Top 12 Finalists. How will the lucky singers be revealed? And what will we do to fill the hour?  Click through and follow along! 8:00 p.m. Et. I feel pretty good about Qaasim Middleton's chances of making the Top 12, so his picture is accompanying my recap. I don't know if the judges are getting Wild Card picks or what, but by hook or by crook, I'm betting on Qaasim, at least for another week. 8:02 p.m. I don't have a clue what's happening tonight.
See full article at Hitfix »
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