Edit
The Brink's Job (1978) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (2)
During production, a Boston resident was paid to remove the air conditioner from his window so they could film on that particular street for a shot. The next day when they arrived to continue filming, every window on the street had an air conditioner.
18 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
In August 1978, fifteen unedited reels of the film were stolen at gunpoint from a Boston studio in a bizarre movie heist ironic to the film's heist plot. However, the stolen film was mostly outtakes and dailies that could be easily replaced. The positive prints of negatives of the film's footage were actually held by Technicolor in New York City. The robbers demanded a US $600,000 ransom. The money was never paid and the film completed without the missing footage and without any detrimental delays. When the robbers called to demand their ransom, director William Friedkin told them, "Get a projector and enjoy the film. It's all yours!".
17 of 17 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Based on the 1950 Brink's robbery in Boston where US $2,700,000 was stolen. A few of the real robbers worked as advisers on the film.
10 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Part of the movie was filmed at the garage where the actual robbery took place. The garage now is just a regular parking garage and no longer is used by Brink's.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Some of the reporters/photographers who covered the original robbery were used as extras in the film as themselves.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The Brink's of the film's title and the place where the robbery takes place is an abbreviated short form of Brink's Incorporated. The final credits declare that Brink's is a registered trademark of Brinks Incorporated. The end credits give special thanks to Brink's Incorporated for its cooperation in making this movie and state that "Since 1859 nobody has ever lost a penny entrusting their valuables to Brink's".
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This film was made and released about two years after its source non-fiction novel "Big Stickup at Brink's" by author Noel Behn was first published in 1977. Behn interviewed five of the actual Brink's Job robbers and his publisher maintained that almost one thousand hours of interviews were recorded on audio tape.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
There is a brief view of a coffee shop that appears to be a parody of Edward Hopper's famous painting Nighthawks.
6 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The march that's used as a theme for the FBI is from Sergei Prokofiev's 1919 opera "The Love for Three Oranges". It had previously been used as the theme of the radio show "The FBI in Peace and War", which aired on CBS from 1944 to 1958.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
There were three more movies made about the great Brink's robbery, which occurred in Boston, back in 1950 : Six Bridges to Cross (1955) - 1955 - Blueprint for Robbery (1961) - 1959 - and Brinks: The Great Robbery (1976), for TV - 1976.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
John Frankenheimer was the original director, but producer Dino De Laurentiis didn't like the script by George V. Higgins which he planned to use, and so he departed the project amicably.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
When shooting the aftermath of the robbery in the garage where the boys start opening the money bags and frolicking in cash, Director William Friedkin did not like the way the prop money looked on film. To remedy this, Dino DiLaurentis wrote a check for approximately $700,000 and had it cashed in 1, 5,10, and 20 dollar bills. The money was then transported to the set in actual Brink's trucks and the scene was shot using real money.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The term "pete" is used to describe a vault or safe. Two of the stars of the movie, Falk and Boyle, are named Peter.
0 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The real life Brink's Job was almost a complete success with the robbers only needing eleven more days until the statute of limitations ran out on the case. However, on 5th January 1956, robber Specs O'Keefe revealed all to the F.B.I in in the Hampden County Jail - six years after the heist.
9 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The film's closing epilogue states: "After serving fourteen years in prison, the men who robbed Brink's were paroled and returned to live comfortable lives in Boston. To this day, despite continuing efforts by the F.B.I., less than $50,000 of the stolen money has been recovered."
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page


Recently Viewed