6.5/10
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The Brink's Job (1978)

A fictional retelling of the infamous Brink's Company robbery in Boston, which took place on January 17th, 1950, with a score of $2.700.000, and cost the American taxpayers $29.000.000 to apprehend the culprits with only $58.000 recovered.

Director:

William Friedkin

Writers:

Walon Green (screenplay), Noel Behn (based on "Big Stickup At Brink's")
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Peter Falk ... Tony Pino
Peter Boyle ... Joe McGinnis
Allen Garfield ... Vinnie Costa (as Allen Goorwitz)
Warren Oates ... Specs O'Keefe
Gena Rowlands ... Mary Pino
Paul Sorvino ... Jazz Maffie
Sheldon Leonard ... J. Edgar Hoover
Gerard Murphy Gerard Murphy ... Sandy Richardson
Kevin O'Connor Kevin O'Connor ... Stanley Gusciora
Claudia Peluso Claudia Peluso ... Gladys
Patrick Hines Patrick Hines ... H. H. Rightmire
Malachy McCourt ... Mutt Murphy
Walter Klavun Walter Klavun ... Daniels
Randy Jurgensen ... F.B.I. Agent
John Brandon ... F.B.I. Agent
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Storyline

After a long spate of bad luck, the little criminal Tony and his gang successfully rob one of Brink's security transports, taking $30,000. Surprisingly their coup doesn't make the press. Curious Tony checks out their headquarters and finds out that their security standard is low beyond belief. Now a really big coup is prepared... Written by Tom Zoerner <Tom.Zoerner@informatik.uni-erlangen.de>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The robbery nobody thought could happen by the guys nobody thought could pull it off. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Crime | Drama | History

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Part of the movie was filmed at the garage where the actual robbery took place. The garage now is just a regular parking garage and no longer is used by Brink's. See more »

Goofs

According to information later gleaned from Joseph "Specs" O'Keefe, Joseph "Big Joe" McGinnis was the originator of the heist. He brought in Atonia "Fat" Pino and Stanley "Gus" Gusciora. See more »

Quotes

[last lines]
Neighborhood Kid: Hey Tony, you're the greatest! Nobody ever do what you did, Tony!
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Crazy Credits

The film opens with Universal's early 1940's logo and closes with the 1970's logo. See more »


Soundtracks

In the Mood
Written by Wingy Manone, Andy Razaf and Joe Garland (uncredited)
by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra (as Glenn Miller and his Orchestra)
Courtesy of RCA Records
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User Reviews

 
"To Brink's Tony"
12 July 2007 | by bkoganbingSee all my reviews

Words almost fail me in talking about how much I love this film, this very funny, very stylish portrayal of what was considered the robbery of the last century.

First of all it could never have been done earlier. J. Edgar Hoover was not a figure to be satirized before May of 1972 when he breathed his last. Sheldon Leonard who plays him here and has him get it all wrong about who pulled the Brink's Armored Car Robbery, would not have taken the role, neither would any other actor. No one wanted to be on that man's bad side. Hoover was not quite the figure you see Leonard play here, though Leonard is fine in the part. Books and films subsequent to his death still really haven't got it quite right about him.

For all of J. Edgar's fulminations about the great Communist conspiracy at work in the Brink's job, the whole point of The Brink's Job is who actually did it. Six very ordinary street criminals, none of them violent felons in any way and one fence who declared himself in on the job.

The group is headed by Peter Falk who should have been Oscar nominated for his portrayal of Tony Pino, the group's leader and planner. You see The Brink's Job, Peter Falk will remain with you forever. A man without complications and hangups, he's a thief because it's his profession. He does have pride in how good he is though.

Some of Falk's best scenes are with his wife Gena Rowlands. She too is a woman who stands by her man. No doubt they came from the same hardscrabble background in Boston's Italian North End and she's completely supportive of him and his work. In particular I love the scene where she's bidding him off to work just like any other wife who's husband had a night job. Don't forget your screwdriver, here's a sandwich in case you get hungry, the scene is priceless.

I also love the scene in the restaurant where he takes her after a nice score. Falk is at the height of his considerable talents as he tells Rowlands of his plans for the Brink's Armored Car Company.

What everyone will love when they see this film is how comparatively easy it was for these knockabout guys from Boston to accomplish stealing over 4 million dollars. This score was so big, it HAD to be the work of a master criminal mind. The thing is it was, the mind was just not in a body where you would expect it to be found.

The others in the mob are Paul Sorvino, Kevin O'Connor, Warren Oates, Gerard Murphy and Peter Boyle who plays the fence. But my favorite in the mob and in the film is Allen Garfield who plays Falk's brother-in-law and sidekick who Falk keeps around for laughs. They have an Abbott&Costello like relationship with everything Garfield touches turning to waste product. My favorite scene in the whole film is when they decide to rob a gum factory payroll. Poor Garfield accidentally presses the wrong switch and he's awash in gumballs. Falk's and Sorvino's differing reactions are priceless.

A lot of the film was shot in Boston which in many ways is a city that tries more than most to keep it's traditional look. I haven't been in that city in about five years, but I daresay you could remake The Brink's Job today in the same area.

But if you did it wouldn't be as good, that isn't possible.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian

Release Date:

8 December 1978 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Brink's See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$15,500,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$7,909,950

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$7,909,950
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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