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5 user 4 critic

The Fall of Ako Castle (1978)

Akô-jô danzetsu (original title)
This is the story of "The Forty-Seven Ronin." Based on historical events in 1701-2, the movie tells the tale of the Asano clan's downfall and the revenge of its former samurai on the perpetrator of the catastrophe.

Director:

Kinji Fukasaku

Writers:

Kôji Takada (screenplay), Kôji Takada (story)
Reviews
1 nomination. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Shin'ichi Chiba ... Kazuemon Fuwa (as Sonny Chiba)
Kinnosuke Nakamura Kinnosuke Nakamura ... Kuranosuke Ohishi (as Kinnosuke Yorozuya)
Tsunehiko Watase Tsunehiko Watase ... Heihachiro Kobayashi
Masaomi Kondô Masaomi Kondô ... Hashimoto
Toshirô Mifune ... Tsuchiya
Kyôko Enami Kyôko Enami ... Ukibashi
Kasho Nakamura Kasho Nakamura ... Oishi Kuranosuke
Shinsuke Mikimoto Shinsuke Mikimoto ... Shikibe
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Shinsuke Ashida ... Shikibe
Jun Fujimaki Jun Fujimaki ... Yajuemon
Takuya Fujioka ... Kurobei Ohno
Seizô Fukumoto
Mieko Harada ... Hatsu Hashimoto
Nobuo Kaneko ... Kira
Yoshi Katô Yoshi Katô ... Yahei Horibe
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Storyline

This is the story of "The Forty-Seven Ronin." Based on historical events in 1701-2, the movie tells the tale of the Asano clan's downfall and the revenge of its former samurai on the perpetrator of the catastrophe.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


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Did You Know?

Goofs

The movie subtitles state the events began in 1702. In fact Asano's crime took place on April 21, 1701. The revenge on Kira took place on January 30, 1703, not on December 14, 1702. The samurai committed seppuku on March 30, 1703, not on February 4, 1704. All these errors result from wrong conversion of Japanese dates to Gregorian calendar. See more »

User Reviews

 
Chushingura/47 Ronin
8 September 2005 | by alice_fryeSee all my reviews

This is director Kenji Fukasaku's contribution to the 47 Ronin story, and it represents something of a combination of Mizoguchi's 1941 version and the 1962 version from director Inagaki. Supposedly, Fukasaku wanted to turn the much loved story on its head, but star Kinnosuke Yorozuya used his then extremely high influence with the studio to keep the traditional telling. Fukasaku did get his way with the fight scene, which was choreographed and led by Sonny Chiba, so viewers can expect lotsa action.

Lord Asano is not as well fleshed out as he is in Inagaki's effort, so you learn more about the depth of the insult and its significance from the remarks of his loyal samurai. Kira's greedy and conniving personality, so wonderfully conveyed in Inagaki's film, are also less emphasized. Strong supporting performances are delivered by Hiroki Matsukata (the stuttering Shogun Iemitsu in "Shogun's Samurai",) the ubiquitous Tetsuro Tamba and one of my personal favorites, Mikio Narita (the chess player in "Zatoichi and the Chess Expert".) Mifune has a small, but critical role, as well.

The movie is a visual treat for fans of jidai-geki (period films,) and maintains a better pace than the 90 minute longer film from 1941. But I recommend seeing Inagaki's "Chushingura," first, if you are not familiar with the remarkable 47 Ronin. Then pick up "The Fall of Ako Castle" for the fight scenes.


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Details

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

28 October 1978 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

The Fall of Ako Castle See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Toei Kyoto See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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