Quark (1977) - News Poster

(1977– )

News

‘The Orville’ Wouldn’t Be Such a Critical Failure If It Were a Half-Hour Comedy

  • Indiewire
‘The Orville’ Wouldn’t Be Such a Critical Failure If It Were a Half-Hour Comedy
The fact that the new Fox series “The Orville” is an hour-long “space adventure,” not a half-hour sitcom, has proven to be a major surprise for fans of creator Seth MacFarlane.

It makes sense, given that he’s best known for the hundreds of episodes of animated comedy he’s produced since the launch of “Family Guy” in 1999. In addition, there’s much of the show’s marketing: Looking back at the original trailer presented during the Fox upfronts, from the music choices and the punchline-heavy editing to the tagline “the universe has a crew loose,” it’s easy to see why people still seem to think the series is a half-hour comedy.

Of course, as viewers now know, “The Orville” is twice the length and nowhere near as funny as expected. Instead, the freshman drama aims to create a new spin on classic science fiction series like “Star Trek” — and not that successfully.
See full article at Indiewire »

Jonathan Kaufer, Writer and Director, Dies in Car Accident

Writer-director Jonathan Kaufer, who helmed 1982’s “Soup for One,” starring Saul Rubinek, for Warner Bros., and the 1997 film “Bad Manners,” starring David Strathairn and Bonnie Bedelia, died Oct. 2 in a car accident en route from Las Vegas to Los Angeles. He was 58.

Kaufer was still in his teens attending Sarah Lawrence College when he was hired onto the writing staff of “Mork & Mindy.” Director Howard Zieff brought him into the feature arena, and Kaufer did rewrites on Barbra Streisand starrer “The Main Event” and “Unfaithfully Yours,” starring Dudley Moore.

Kaufer’s TV credits include penning episodes of ABC’s “Holmes and Yo-Yo,” NBC’s “Quark” and HBO’s “Dream On,” the last of which he also directed.

Survivors include a son, Jordan Maxwell Caufer, from his marriage to actress Pia Zadora (pictured above with Kaufer), and a brother, Scott Kaufer, a former comedy executive at Warner Bros. who has written and produced for TV.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Costume Designer Grady Hunt Dies at 91

Costume Designer Grady Hunt Dies at 91
Nine-times Emmy nominated costume designer Grady Hunt died May 5 in Hollywood. He was 91.

Born on May 16, 1921 in Lone Oak, Texas, the costumer began his career — after serving in the Navy during WWII — by opening a couture shop called Gradis in Dallas, Texas. After moving to Los Angeles in the 1950s, his first project was designing costumes for then-theater director Aaron Spelling.

Hunt was a costumer for Columbia Pictures for 15 years, and is most remembered for his work on “The Milton Berle Show,” “Saturday Night Review” and the “Colgate Comedy Hour” as well as styling such stars as Anne Baxter, Joan Crawford, Eartha Kitt, Ruta Lee and Donna Wynter.

His Emmy-nominated work included “Fantasy Island,” “The Dream Merchants” (1980), “Belulah Land” (1981), “Ziegfield: The Man and His Women” (1978), “Quark” (1978), “The Quest” (1977), “The Snoop Sisters “ (1974) and “Columbo: Dagger of the Mind” (1973).

Hunt’s partner of 54 years, Emmy-award winning costume designer William L. “Bill” Jobe,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Party Favors: The 2010 Meh Awards

  • Quick Stop
Pasadena - Forget the AFI Top 10 list of Best TV shows. Why should care about TV since they are the American Film Institute? This is kind like the American Diabetic Prevention Society’s Top 10 Favorite Sugary Candy Bars list. Or Bravo’s Top 10 Hunting Shows. Or Madd’s Best 10 Drinks to Mess You Up. Or Charlie Sheen’s Top 10 Things You Can Do Without Involving Hookers and Blow. If they care about TV that much, shouldn’t they be the Aftvi? But they are a pack of List Whores over at AFI with their 100 Years a 100 Stupid Lists press releases.

Why does critic or critic group have to tell you the Best or Worst of the Year? Party Favors is proud to announce the Meh Awards for the 10 TV shows that didn’t work for me in 2010. They weren’t the most pathetic things on TV, but made me lose interest in watching them.
See full article at Quick Stop »

1950’s Sci-Fi Star Richard Devon Dies

Character actor Richard Devon was a familiar face in films and television from the early 1950s. He was often cast as desperados and gangsters in western and crime films. He was also noted for his roles in a handful of Roger Corman cult classics in the 1950s. Devon was featured as Satan in the supernatural tale of past lives, The Undead (1957), with Pamela Duncan and Allison Hayes. He was King Stark of the Grimolts in the campy The Saga of the Viking Women and Their Voyage to the Waters of the Great Sea Serpent (1957), with Abby Dalton and Susan Cabot, and was the alien possessed Dr. Pol Van Ponder in the sci-fi feature War of the Satellites (1958) with Cabot and Dick Miller.

Devon worked his way through drama school in Los Angeles, performing chores in lieu of paying tuition. He also worked in early local television, and played a recurring
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

This Weekend In Sf & Fantasy Television

  • Starlog
Here are highlights from this weekend’s television viewing.

The Star Trek: The Next Generation cast visits the Family Guy Universe Sunday night! If you missed its premiere months ago, don’t miss this repeat! It’s animated!

Friday 5/29

Note: Ghost Whisperer is pre-empted. It woulda been a rerun anyhow.

7:30 p.m. (all times Est) Cartoon Network Star Wars: The Clone Wars Decoded

Rerun! “Defenders of the Peace.” George Takei guest voices.

8:30 p.m. Cartoon Network Batman: Brave & The Bold

Rerun! “Legends of the Bat Mite.” The irrepressible Bat Mite has a few tales to tell.

11:35 p.m. CBS The Late Show With David Letterman

Rerun! Robin Williams guests. There’s a good possibility, if memory serves, that he will say funny things.

12:05 a.m. ABC Jimmy Kimmel Live

Rerun! Hugh Jackman & John Cho guest! They talk about Star Trek &Wolverine. Or vice versa.

Saturday 5/30

9 p.
See full article at Starlog »

Quark: The Complete Series

In 1965, Buck Henry and Mel Brooks exploited the success and ubiquity of James Bond and the Pink Panther movies with the classic spoof Get Smart! Twelve years later, Henry—now flying solo—took notice of a massive boom in science fiction and created 1977's Quark, a Get Smart-style spoof that sets its satirical phasers on another outsized pulp genre which had already veered close to self-parody. Henry wasn't as successful this time around, and the show was cancelled after a mere eight episodes. Gone but not forgotten, Henry's romp piggybacked on the popularity of the science-fiction perennials it spoofed (three of the show's episodes are direct parodies of Star Trek, while a fourth spoofs Star Wars) to a small but loyal cult following. Consequently, hardcore Trekkies will probably get a lot more out of Quark's spaced-out shenanigans than people who regularly get laid. Richard Benjamin took a break from playing.
See full article at The AV Club »

Quark

In 1965, Buck Henry and Mel Brooks exploited the success and ubiquity of James Bond and the Pink Panther movies with the classic spoof Get Smart! Twelve years later, Henry—now flying solo—took notice of a massive boom in science fiction and created 1977's Quark, a Get Smart-style spoof that sets its satirical phasers on another outsized pulp genre which had already veered close to self-parody. Henry wasn't as successful this time around, and the show was cancelled after a mere eight episodes. Gone but not forgotten, Henry's romp piggybacked on the popularity of the science-fiction perennials it spoofed (three of the show's episodes are direct parodies of Star Trek, while a fourth spoofs Star Wars) to a small but loyal cult following. Consequently, hardcore Trekkies will probably get a lot more out of Quark's spaced-out shenanigans than people who regularly get laid. Richard Benjamin took a break from playing.
See full article at The AV Club »

See also

External Sites