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Film Review: ‘Set It Up’

Old-fashioned date movies don’t fill mall multiplexes the way they did a decade or two ago, before megabudget tentpoles subsumed the bulk of adult moviegoing, but they appear to have a future on Netflix — for couples, at least, who have already reached the staying-in point in their relationship. A sunny, innocuous romcom that matches millennial neuroses to age-old Cupid’s-arrow contrivance, “Set It Up” makes a case for the genre remaining big, à la Norma Desmond, even as the pictures get small. Director Claire Scanlon and writer Katie Silberman’s slight, cutely bow-tied tale of two overworked young PAs tactically engineering a romance between their demanding bosses — only to (surprise!) fall for each other in the process — may be more frothy than it is actually funny, but in adorable stars Glen Powell and Zoey Deutch, it happens upon a perky pairing that might, in another era, have become a fixture.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Walk of Fame Honoree Jeff Goldblum on ‘Jurassic World’ Return, Favorite Memes

Walk of Fame Honoree Jeff Goldblum on ‘Jurassic World’ Return, Favorite Memes
Though he’s been working in films since 1974 — when he played Freak #1 in “Death Wish” — and starred in some of the biggest blockbusters of all time, it seems like only recently that the whole world fell for the charms of Jeff Goldblum. Perhaps it’s the abundance of memes that have taken over the internet; asked for his personal favorite and he cites his “Jurassic Park” co-star Sam Neill “putting his cheek next to the giant shirtless Jeff Goldblum and riding the waves of my breath.” It could be the wry, halting delivery that makes him so much fun to imitate. Or the sense of humor he has about his own image, such as gamely reading “thirst tweets” about himself for Buzzfeed.

This golden age has not gone unnoticed by the star himself. “Things seem to be flourishing right now,” he says. “For whatever reason, I seem to be in a growth spurt.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Why Woody Allen Wasn’t Charged: a Timeline of Dylan Farrow’s Accusations

Why Woody Allen Wasn’t Charged: a Timeline of Dylan Farrow’s Accusations
What happened between Woody Allen and Dylan Farrow one afternoon in August 1992 has been in dispute for 25 years.

On Monday, his “Annie Hall” co-star Diane Keaton pledged her support for him – but many others are abandoning the filmmaker. Actors including Timothee Chalamet and “Lady Bird” director Greta Gerwig have distanced themselves from Allen. The New York Times ran a story Sunday with the headline “Can Woody Allen Work in Hollywood Again?”

Dylan Farrow has said actors who continue to work with Allen are “complicit” — but Allen has accused her mother, Mia Farrow, of “relentlessly coaching” Dylan Farrow as a child, to get revenge for his relationship with Mia Farrow’s adopted daughter Soon-Yi Previn.

Also Read: Diane Keaton: 'Woody Allen Is My Friend And I Continue to Believe Him'

Allen has never been charged, and authorities seemed torn on whether he should be when the accusations against him first came to light.
See full article at The Wrap »

Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Annie Hall,’ ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Reds’

  • Gold Derby
Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Annie Hall,’ ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Reds’
Diane Keaton is one of those special actors who can shift from comedy to drama without missing a beat. She has been nominated for two Oscars in comedy (“Something’s Gotta Give” and winning for “Annie Hall”) and two in drama (“Reds” and “Marvin’s Room”). Keaton is now back in theaters joining Oscar winners Jane Fonda and Mary Steenburgen, as well as five-time Emmy Award winner Candice Bergen in Bill Holderman‘s comedy “Book Club.”

Keaton is also a key cast member in one of the seminal film series of all time — Francis Ford Coppola‘s “The Godfather” trilogy. Her heartbreaking turn as Kay Adams Corleone, a woman who sincerely believed that her husband was a good man, will forever be a part of motion picture history.

See AFI Life Achievement Recipients Photo Gallery

A recipient of the 2017 American Film Institute life achievement award, Keaton has also been nominated
See full article at Gold Derby »

Wamg Spotlights Stars of Comedy Book Club

(L-r) Diane Keaton, Candice Bergen, Jane Fonda, Mary Steenburgen in the film, Book Club, by Paramount Pictures. Photo credit: Melinda Sue Gordon © 2018 Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.

The new comedy Book Club, opening May 18, focuses on something that has long been a favorite of women of all ages – the book club. But this comedy has something extra to offer: four legendary stars with long and storied careers. Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton, Mary Steenburgen and Candice Bergen have garnered enough awards and nominations, including Oscars, and have demonstrated enough star staying-power on the big screen and the small one to qualify as bonafide Hollywood legends. Yet each woman has carved out her own unique path to that title.

They have some things in common, these legendary women. Each is multi-talented, playing both drama and comedy while working with an array of big-name directors and actors. As in any long career, each
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Diane Keaton is one of those special actors who can shift from comedy to drama without missing a beat. She has been nominated for two Oscars in comedy (“Something’s Gotta Give” and winning for “Annie Hall”) and two in drama (“Reds” and “Marvin’s Room”). Keaton is now back in theaters joining Oscar winners Jane Fonda and Mary Steenburgen, as well as five-time Emmy Award winner Candice Bergen in Bill Holderman‘s comedy “Book Club.”

Keaton is also a key cast member in one of the seminal film series of all time — Francis Ford Coppola‘s “The Godfather” trilogy. Her heartbreaking turn as Kay Adams Corleone, a woman who sincerely believed that her husband was a good man, will forever be a part of motion picture history.

A recipient of the 2017 American Film Institute life achievement award, Keaton has also been nominated for eight Golden Globes for her work in film,
See full article at Gold Derby »

James Cameron Still Can’t Believe ‘Annie Hall’ Beat ‘Star Wars’ for Best Picture: ‘What the F*ck Are You People Thinking?’

James Cameron Still Can’t Believe ‘Annie Hall’ Beat ‘Star Wars’ for Best Picture: ‘What the F*ck Are You People Thinking?’
James Cameron has long been a critic of the Academy’s refusal to award science-fiction films major Oscars. The “Avatar” filmmaker told IndieWire just last month that science-fiction movies at are “definitely a red-headed stepchild [at the Oscars] when it comes to the acting, producing, directing categories.” Speaking with Wired, Cameron remembered the first time he realized that science-fiction movies faced an uphill battle at the Academy Awards.

“The first time I noticed this was when I was just a movie fan and not a practitioner yet, when ‘Star Wars,’ which to me was the ultimate science-fiction film of its day, so this would have been 1977, probably the Oscars of 1978, lost to ‘Annie Hall,'” Cameron said. “This little cute relationship story and ‘Star Wars.’ What the fuck are you people thinking?”

Cameron criticized the sentiment the Oscars put forth that “science-fiction is not humanistic enough, that it’s not about real people.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Love and Bullets,’ ‘A Ciambra’ Split Top Honors at David Awards as Italy Tackles Gender Inequality

‘Love and Bullets,’ ‘A Ciambra’ Split Top Honors at David Awards as Italy Tackles Gender Inequality
Naples-set mob musical “Love and Bullets,” directed by Marco and Antonio Manetti, and Jonas Carpignano’s slice-of-life drama “A Ciambra,” split top honors Wednesday night at Italy’s 62nd David di Donatello Awards, the country’s equivalent of the Oscars.

The best picture prize went to “Bullets,” which had scored the most nominations and took home 5 statuettes, including supporting actress, music, and costume design.

And the best director nod went to “A Ciambra,” which also took the editing David. “A Ciambra,” which is set in a Romani community in Southern Italy, is executive produced by Martin Scorsese. It was released in February in North America by Sundance Selects.

“Bullets” has not made a killing at the Italian box office, where it grossed a decent $1.8 million, but it’s been a favorite with Italian critics and industry folks ever since launching in competition from the Venice Film Festival last September.

The
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Amateurs’ Theater Review: Jordan Harrison’s New Comedy Upends Conventions

  • The Wrap
‘The Amateurs’ Theater Review: Jordan Harrison’s New Comedy Upends Conventions
Long before #MeToo and Ronan Farrow tarnished him, and back in the days when New York’s cultural elite could not lavish enough praise on his movies, Woody Allen did deliver one onscreen moment that remains truly audacious to this day. In “Annie Hall,” his Alvy Singer character is waiting in line at the movies when he overhears a man pontificate about and grossly misinterpret “The Medium Is the Message.” Wanting to verbally trash the blowhard to his face, Singer instead walks off camera to bring Marshall McLuhan into the frame to do the job for him. Regardless of how...
See full article at The Wrap »

Woody Allen’s Oscar-winning women: how did his direction affect them?

In the wake of ongoing allegations, how do we process Allen’s reputation for writing award worthy roles for women?

Wonder Wheel might well be the last Woody Allen movie to get a major release. Allegations of sexual assault by his daughter, Dylan (which Allen has denied), have dismantled his reputation in some quarters, and many actors – including Greta Gerwig, Ellen Page and Rebecca Hall – have said they will never work with him again. Even actors in Wonder Wheel are expressing regrets.

At odds with this is the inescapable fact that Allen has given women better roles than pretty much any film-maker of the modern era. Allen’s Oscar record speaks for itself: two best actress winners (Diane Keaton in Annie Hall, Cate Blanchett in Blue Jasmine); four best supporting actresses; and six more nominations for women, not to mention mature, female-centred films such as Hannah and Her Sisters and Interiors.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Oscars 2018: Which 20 previous winners should present to this year’s 20 acting nominees?

Oscars 2018: Which 20 previous winners should present to this year’s 20 acting nominees?
One of the highlights of the 2009 Academy Awards ceremony was the surprise addition of 20 Oscar winners presenting to that year’s acting nominees. It started with five Best Supporting Actress champs (Whoopi Goldberg, Goldie Hawn, Anjelica Huston, Eva Marie Saint, Tilda Swinton) who gave out the award to Penelope Cruz, welcoming her to their club. While all of those presenting that evening had indeed won the category before, each one often had no connection at all to the person they were introducing.

The following year new producers followed a similar format of five people presenting to a new crop of five for the lead categories only. While all of them had working relationships with the nominees (like Michelle Pfeiffer for Jeff Bridges and Stanley Tucci for Meryl Streep), most of them were not Oscar winners.

SEEOscars 2018: Here are all 156 living actresses and actors who could join a 90th anniversary
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars: Best Picture Winner Poised to Rout History

Oscars: Best Picture Winner Poised to Rout History
Those who have been following the annual ups and downs of Oscar season long enough know that while the numbers don’t lie, they certainly don’t tell the full story. Using statistics to guess which way the Academy breeze will blow in the best picture race can wind up leading you straight into a wall — as frequently has happened over the past several years.

Conventional wisdom held that after “Wings,” “Grand Hotel” and “Driving Miss Daisy,” no film without a director nomination could again win best picture, until “Argo” pulled it off. Ever since “Ordinary People,” no film without a film editing nomination could hit the jackpot, until “Birdman” managed it. And certainly no film with a record number of nominations — as many as winners “All About Eve” and “Titanic” — could possibly lose Hollywood’s top prize, until “La La Land” proved otherwise.

This year, no matter what wins best picture, it will be
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars 2018: Best Picture & Best Actress have gone hand-in-hand only 7 times in 75 years – will they match again?

  • Gold Derby
Oscars 2018: Best Picture & Best Actress have gone hand-in-hand only 7 times in 75 years – will they match again?
This year’s Oscars are unique in how much more female-driven the Best Picture nominees are. Five out of the nine contenders in the top category have female leads, and four of the Best Actress nominees are in films that are also up for the top award: Sally Hawkins (“The Shape of Water“), Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Saoirse Ronan (“Lady Bird”) and Meryl Streep (“The Post”). If one of those films wins both Best Picture and Best Actress, it would be only the 8th to pair those up in the last 75 years.

In the last three-quarters of a century the seven Best Picture/Best Actress match-ups were as follows:

1975 — “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and lead actress Louise Fletcher

1977 — “Annie Hall” and lead actress Diane Keaton

1983 — “Terms of Endearment” and lead actress Shirley MacLaine

1989 — “Driving Miss Daisy” and lead actress Jessica Tandy

1991 — “The Silence of the Lambs
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Get Out’ and ‘Lady Bird’ attempting to be sixth Best Picture champ without any below-the-line nominations

‘Get Out’ and ‘Lady Bird’ attempting to be sixth Best Picture champ without any below-the-line nominations
Get Out” and “Lady Bird” have inhabited the No. 3 and 4 spots in our Best Picture Oscar odds in some order since nominations were announced. On the surface, those high rankings make sense — they’re two well-received, critically acclaimed movies by exciting new filmmakers. But look a little closer and you’ll see that neither film has any below-the-line nominations. If either wins the top prize, it’d only be the sixth film to do so and the first in 37 years.

The five films in this small club are “The Broadway Melody” (1928/29), “Grand Hotel” (1931/32), “It Happened One Night” (1934), “Annie Hall” (1977) and “Ordinary People” (1980). Of these, Best Picture was the only award “The Broadway Melody,” which was also up for director and actress, won and it was the only category in which “Grand Hotel” was nominated.

Get Out” has four nominations, one fewer than “Lady Bird,” and they’re all for acting,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Innovative Genre Movies Goose This Year’s Oscar Race

Innovative Genre Movies Goose This Year’s Oscar Race
Will this be one of those rare years when Oscar shows the lowly “genre” film a little love?

Undoubtedly, if only because so many of this year’s best-picture contenders come wrapped in indie-film credibility and are layered with contemporary sensibilities that elevate the films beyond the “genre” label.

Consider “Get Out,” which combines two particularly Oscar-averse genres — horror and comedy. Writer-director Jordan Peele blended them into an awards juggernaut that dives headfirst into one of the biggest hot-button issues of the day: race.

Before we go further, let’s define our terms: While the French word “genre” refers to a way of classifying or categorizing artistic works, the term “genre film” usually stands as a pejorative when thrown around by snobby critics while referring to Westerns, sci-fi films, sports tales, war stories and a few other categories. It’s a way of dismissing a film (“It’s a genre film”) — a fancier way of saying, “Well
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars flashback: Frances McDormand sashays to podium for her 1st Best Actress award for ‘Fargo’ [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Frances McDormand sashays to podium for her 1st Best Actress award for ‘Fargo’ [Watch]
With her victories at the Golden Globes, Critics’ Choice, and SAG Awards, Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri”) has officially become the frontrunner with Gold Derby odds of 2/13 to win another Best Actress Oscar on March 4. It would mark her second victory at the Academy Awards after “Fargo” 21 years ago, placing her in third for the longest period between Oscar wins (behind Katharine Hepburn’s 34 years and Meryl Streep’s 29.) Watch her acceptance speech above from the 1997 ceremony as she sashays to the podium to receive the award from Nicolas Cage.

SEEOscar Best Actress Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

Fargo” remains one of the most acclaimed movies of the 1990s and was directed by her husband Joel Coen, who co-wrote and won the Oscar for original screenplay with his brother Ethan. Her character was Marge Gunderson, a pregnant policewoman who uncovers a homicide plot in Northern Minnesota.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Roman Polanski and great artists’ flawed genius | Letters

W Stephen Gilbert writes that what unites most of the men currently accused of sexually ‘inappropriate behaviour’ is their work in progressive and socio-politically challenging films; while Jan Potworowski says that historical context may help us understand, but not excuse, Polanski’s behaviour

Hadley Freeman writes powerfully about Roman Polanski and the fluctuating attitudes to his admitted abuse of an underage girl 40 years ago (G2, 30 January). She alludes also to Harvey Weinstein and Woody Allen who, along with directors such as Bryan Singer, Oliver Stone and Lars Von Trier and actors including Kevin Spacey, Jeffrey Tambor and Dustin Hoffman, have been accused of, in the current phrase, “inappropriate behaviour”.

It concerns me that what seems to unite all these men is that they have done significant work in progressive and socio-politically challenging films. Were Will Hays of Hollywood’s repressive Hays Code alive today, he would have been delighted that
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition

Meryl Streep in ‘Kramer vs. Kramer’: A look back at her first Oscar win and the competition
This article marks Part 2 of the 21-part Gold Derby series analyzing Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

In 1978, Meryl Streep, already renowned for her work on the New York stage, grabbed the attention of moviegoers across the country with her Oscar-nominated turn in the Best Picture champ “The Deer Hunter.” That year, however, would seem minor in comparison to what was on the horizon in 1979.

Streep was about to work with three of the decade’s hottest directors – Woody Allen, at his most in-demand after “Annie Hall” (1977) and “Interiors” (1978); Robert Benton, whose “The Late Show” (1977) was a big hit; and Jerry Schatzberg, who won critical acclaim with “The Panic in Needle Park” (1971) and “Scarecrow” (1973).

The resulting trio of Allen’s “Manhattan,” Benton’s “Kramer vs.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Judd Apatow Hits Back at Diane Keaton Over Woody Allen Support: ‘He Was So Awful to That Family’

Judd Apatow Hits Back at Diane Keaton Over Woody Allen Support: ‘He Was So Awful to That Family’
Judd Apatow is sticking up for Dylan Farrow by hitting back at Diane Keaton after the “Annie Hall” actress showed support for her friend and former collaborator Woody Allen. Farrow has said for years that Allen molested her as a child, which the director has always denied. Keaton wrote on Twitter: “Woody Allen is my friend and I continue to believe him.” She linked to a 1992 “60 Minutes” interview in which Allen defends himself.

Read More:Diane Keaton Stands by Woody Allen: ‘He’s My Friend and I Continue to Believe Him’

Apatow responded to Keaton’s support by tweeting his own thoughts on the matter. Keaton encouraged her followers to watch Allen’s 1992 defense and to “see what you think,” and here’s what Apatow had to say after watching the interview: “I see a man who wanted what he wanted and didn’t care that he was having an
See full article at Indiewire »

Diane Keaton: 'Woody Allen is my friend and I continue to believe him'

Actor takes to Twitter to share statement of support for the director, who has been accused of sexually assaulting his adopted daughter Dylan Farrow

Diane Keaton has spoken up in support of Woody Allen, stating that she believes the director’s defence against allegations of molestation made by his adopted daughter Dylan Farrow. Keaton, who worked with Allen on a number films including Annie Hall and Manhattan, defended the director on Twitter, sharing a TV interview in which Allen dismissed the claims made against him. “Woody Allen is my friend and I continue to believe him. It might be of interest to take a look at the 60 Minute interview from 1992 and see what you think,” she wrote.

Woody Allen is my friend and I continue to believe him. It might be of interest to take a look at the 60 Minute interview from 1992 and see what you think. https://t.co/QVQIUxImB1

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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