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Own Picks Up Jamey Giddens Drama 'Ambitions' From Will Packer Media

Own announced today two new series from prolific hit-maker Will Packer and his Will Packer Media banner: the soapy new drama series Ambitions (written by Daytime Confidential's Jamey Giddens) from global content leader Lionsgate and the unscripted dating series Ready to Love. Packer will serve as executive producer for both series. The new shows mark the first television series to be created under Packer's first-look deal with the network.

The announcement comes as Own's momentum and diversified programming slate continues to grow. The network recently delivered its highest rated first quarter in four years in the network's key W25-54 demo with year-over-year gains of +6% in W25-54, +15% in African American women and +5% in total viewers. In addition, year-to-date Own is the #1 cable network for African American women in primetime.

"Will is a creative powerhouse who knows what audiences want," said Erik Logan, president of Own. "He has an insightful
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Interview – Marvel’s Black Panther costume designer Ruth E. Carter at WonderCon

Ruth E. Carter has worked in the film industry for over three decades as a costume designer, with more than forty films on her resume. She has garnered two Oscar nominations for Best Costume Design for Spike Lee’s Malcolm X and Steven Spielberg’s Amistad as well as an Emmy nomination for the reboot of Roots.

More recently, Ruth has done costume work on films like Lee DanielsThe Butler and Ava Duvernay’s Selma and now she has brought her talents to Marvel’s latest film, Black Panther.

She spoke to Flickering Myth’s Tai Freligh recently at WonderCon about designing the costumes for the various tribes as well as the thought behind achieving a blend of tribal and high-tech and the role of jewelry in the movie.

You can view the full interview below.

After the events of Captain America: Civil War, King T’Challa returnsohome to the reclusive,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Emmys 2018: ‘American Crime Story’ could become the first show since ‘Prime Suspect’ to repeat as Best Limited Series

This spring FX’s “American Crime Story” returned for its second season, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace,” which explores the murder of the famous fashion designer (played by Edgar Ramirez) by serial killer Andrew Cunanan (played by Darren Criss). It’s the early front-runner to win Best Limited Series based on the combined predictions of hundreds of Gold Derby users who have entered their picks in our predictions center thus far. The first season of “Acs,” “The People v. O.J. Simpson,” also won top honors in 2016, so a victory for “Versace” would make this the first series since “Prime Suspect” to repeat as Best Limited Series.

Anthologies have had a TV revival in recent years. Ryan Murphy helped re-popularize the form with “American Horror Story,” which debuted in 2011. Since then we’ve seen other anthologies like “Fargo,” “American Crime” and “Black Mirror” earn acclaim and awards. But since that
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Blood & Treasure’: Katia Winter, Michael James Shaw & James Callis Join CBS’ Action-Adventure Series

Former Sleepy Hollow star Katia Winter, Michael James Shaw (Roots) and James Callis (12 Monkeys) have signed on as series regulars in Blood & Treasure, CBS’ hourlong serialized action-adventure series set to premiere in summer 2019. Written by Matt Federman & Stephen Scaia, Blood & Treasure, which hails from CBS Television Studios, centers on a brilliant antiquities expert and a cunning art thief who team up to catch a ruthless terrorist who funds his attacks through…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Oscar winner 'Get Out' shows racism really is terrifying

RacismThe effectiveness of Peele’s film plays on the very real fear that behind every throwaway racial remark lies something of an entirely more sinister magnitude. Universal PicturesVictoria Anderson, Cardiff University Warning: this article contains spoilers Get Out is a comedy-inflected horror story about what it means to be black in America. It’s Jordan Peele’s directorial debut, and until now he has been more widely recognised as one half of comedy duo Key and Peele. But as a director, he makes this movie work – even a little too well. In fact, the only thing more scary than the film are some of the reviews. To summarise: a talented young black photographer called Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) goes on a trip with Rose, his white girlfriend (Allison Williams) to visit her parents. Having already worried that the parents might be racist, Chris is disturbed to find that the seemingly-liberal family has a number of black “servants” who behave like zombies, seemingly controlled and manipulated by an unseen force. He is further unsettled by (mostly white) visitors to the house who make gauche, racially-charged and fetishising comments, crooning over Chris’s “frame and genetic make-up” and announcing “Black is in fashion!” Chris’s fears are realised, and worse. The Armitage family turn out not just to be racist, but to be pathological “negrophiles”. They have developed a horrifying system of abducting, brainwashing and ultimately brain-swapping black people, to use them as pets, sex slaves or repurposed body substitutes. Rose’s hypnotherapist mother mesmerises Chris to make him believe that he is trapped at the bottom of a deep pit. And while Chris wonders how to escape without appearing rude, Rose’s neurosurgeon father auctions him off – to be stripped of his brain – to a blind art critic who wants nothing less than to “see through [his] eyes”. Meet the parents. © Universal Pictures Seasoned horror buffs will know that the standard resolution to a survival-horror film of this type (police turn up at the final hour, villain is dispatched, hero is saved, all’s well that ends well) is not to be anticipated. The “black guy always dies first” has become a self-reflexive horror-movie trope. And if Facebook Live videos have taught us anything, it’s that this uneasily applies to the real world as well. Then again, we might also recall that other classic horror that happens to feature a black male protagonist. In George Romero’s 1968 film Night of The Living Dead the hero gets all the way to the end of the film, only to be shot dead by the authorities – just in time for the end credits. The horrors of slavery Coming in the wake of a slew of slavery-themed dramas such as Roots, Underground and Twelve Years a Slave, Get Out is a transparent nod to the genre. The slavery subtext is hinted at early on when we find that Rose’s liberal, professional mother goes by the name of “Missy”: a common appellation for the Mistress of a slave-holding. Yet the film’s subtle genius lies in its ability to trace almost invisible, yet indelible lines of continuity from the centuries-long slavery period to the present day. Historically, anti-slavery rhetoric – which traces its own history back to the late 18th century – tended to focus on the inhuman physical conditions of the slave ship, and the moral incongruity of human chattel. There remains a cultural tendency to view the “horrors of slavery” in the same concretely objective terms, but it bears stating that white abolitionists were not necessarily of the opinion that blacks were equal to whites. They saw the practice of slavery as dehumanising and degrading to all those who participated in it. During the 19th century, slavery increasingly became both a liability and an embarrassment to what purported to be civilised societies. Lobotomised. © Universal Pictures This residual sense of embarrassment, shame and disavowal arguably persists in Western liberal democracies, where the recollection of slavery and its role in Western history is a source of discomfort. But this easy sense of revulsion doesn’t require one to address slavery’s underlying ideology of racial supremacy, much less the sexual fetishism and sadism that characterised much of its practice, as contemporary accounts will attest. What Peele’s film forces viewers to consider is whether such underlying power relations and warped desires remain wholly intact in our modern society. What has often been missed in the discourse around slavery, and the persistence of post-slavery power relations, is the strategic and enduring psychology of slavery. It is this elusive quality that Peele’s film manages to capture. The institution of slavery necessitated not just sailing and ironmongery skills, but a systematic regime – embedded in law, and lasting for centuries – of unrelenting terror, torture and dehumanisation resulting in absolute control over a cowed and docile workforce. Peele’s film parodies this on a micro-level. Rose’s family mentally break their victims using a multi-stage process that begins with hypnosis and ends with lobotomy. It is no accident that both Mr and Mrs Armitage are professional brain specialists. Check your privilege But what about those reviews? Variety calls it a “searing political statement” disguised as an “escape-the-crazies survival thriller” – where “the crazies are the liberal white elite, who dangerously overestimate the degree of their own enlightenment”. Since the “crazies” in question are complete psychopaths, I’d argue that they have very little investment in their own “enlightenment” – unless that term was intended as a pun. Many reviews – this one included – describe Get Out exclusively as a satire on white liberal elitism, one which asks (white) viewers to “check their privilege”. But they are, perhaps, reading it from just such a privileged perspective. In so doing, they unwittingly repeat the dynamics parodied in the film, invalidating the black experience and ignoring the possibility that the film might not be primarily about the experience of whiteness, nor created specifically for the edification of white audiences. But the Variety review gets worse. Besides a dubious comment about “love [being] color-blind”, the reviewer describes Chris as “a dark-skinned black man” – at which point I started making the same side-eyed facial expression that Chris makes when he first meets the liberally-racist parents. Why the need to doubly-emphasise his “darkness”? This is a minor point, to be sure – and the comment was no doubt made innocently. But the effectiveness of Peele’s film plays on the very real fear that behind every throwaway racial remark lies something of an entirely more sinister magnitude. This, by the way, is what makes the “n” word so explosive. That is to say, each of these uncomfortable moments threatens to reveal a deeply-entrenched racial ideology that some would say has both underpinned and facilitated the cultural and economic development of Europe and America during the past 400 years. Success relied not just on forced labour and territorial expansion/exploitation, but on the carefully-wrought ideologies that enabled it: crucially, the ideological conceit and pseudo-science of race and white supremacy. Colonialism, slavery and Nazi Aryanism evolved from the same fundamental set of beliefs. The terrorism of white supremacy is that it is not only an extremist movement. It is the spectre haunting Get Out, just as it is the spectre that continues to haunt our modern, liberal societies. And in the gaslight of Trump’s America it is, quite literally, terrifying. Victoria Anderson, Researcher/Teacher in Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, Cardiff University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.
See full article at The News Minute »

’13 Reasons Why’ Star Derek Luke Set for Lead Role in NBC Drama Pilot ‘Suspicion’

’13 Reasons Why’ Star Derek Luke Set for Lead Role in NBC Drama Pilot ‘Suspicion’
Derek Luke has been cast as the lead in the NBC drama pilot “Suspicion,” Variety has learned.

The series, based on the book by Joseph Finder, is billed as a “Hitchcockian thriler” that revolves around a man who is coerced to become an informant for the FBI after accepting a loan from his millionaire neighbor.

Luke will star as Danny Goodman. Described as a reluctant hero who doesn’t know it yet, widower Danny is a focused and hardworking man who has done everything in his power to provide for his daughter Ellie, and to make a life for he and his new fiancé,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Roots’ Black Thought Freestyle Raps About Bruce Willis On ‘The Tonight Show’

Black Thought is a master freestyler, and he had no trouble coming up with rhymes about Bruce Willis. Related: Bruce Willis Set To Return As John McClane In New ‘Die Hard’ Movie On Tuesday’s episode of “The Tonight Show” host Jimmy Fallon had the Roots’ rapper play a game in which he freestyle rapped about random
See full article at ET Canada »

Emayatzy Corinealdi Cast in Lead Role in CBS Drama Pilot ‘Red Line’ (Exclusive)

Emayatzy Corinealdi Cast in Lead Role in CBS Drama Pilot ‘Red Line’ (Exclusive)
Emayatzy Corinealdi has been cast in the upcoming CBS drama pilot “Red Line,” Variety has learned exclusively.

In the pilot, after a white cop in Chicago mistakenly shoots and kills a black doctor, the story follow three different families that all have connections with the case as the story is told from each perspective.

Corinealdi will play one of the leads, Tia Young, who is described as a formidable, well-educated woman raised on the South Side of Chicago. Tia’s desire to reconnect with the daughter she gave up for adoption might conflict with her aspirations for a political career. Tia is married to Aaron, and they have a 6-year-old son, Benny.

The project reunites Corinealdi with series executive producer Ava DuVernay, who previously directed the actress in the 2012 film “Middle of Nowhere.” Corinealdi’s other credits include “Ballers,” “Hand of God,” the remake of “Roots,” and the Miles Davis biopic “Miles Ahead.”

She is repped
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Raphael Saadiq on His Oscar-Nominated ‘Mudbound’ Song, Working With Mary J. Blige and Declining Prince’s Record Deal

Raphael Saadiq on His Oscar-Nominated ‘Mudbound’ Song, Working With Mary J. Blige and Declining Prince’s Record Deal
Without overstating the case, singer/songwriter/producer/multi-instrumentalist Raphael Saadiq has had an almost Zelig-like career over the past 30 years. Yet at 51, the peak of that career may have arrived: An Academy Award nomination for Best Song for “Mighty River,” the song he wrote with Mary J. Blige and frequent collaborator Taura Stinson for “Mudbound,” the harrowing Netflix film about a black family in the Jim Crow-era South for which Blige received both Oscar and Golden Globe nominations for her acting as well as her singing.

It’s a long way from the Oakland native’s first big break, which came as Sheila E’s bassist during tours as an opening act for Prince and Lionel Richie. After that band split, he returned to Oakland and formed the R&B group Tony! Toni! Tone!, which had a string of hits in the late 1980s and early 1990s (remember “Feels Good” and “If I Had No Loot”?). By
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Raphael Saadiq on His Oscar-Nominated ‘Mudbound’ Song, Working With Mary J. Blige and Declining Prince’s Record Deal

Raphael Saadiq on His Oscar-Nominated ‘Mudbound’ Song, Working With Mary J. Blige and Declining Prince’s Record Deal
Without overstating the case, singer/songwriter/producer/multi-instrumentalist Raphael Saadiq has had an almost Zelig-like career over the past 30 years. Yet at 51, the peak of that career may have arrived: An Academy Award nomination for Best Song for “Mighty River,” the song he wrote with Mary J. Blige and frequent collaborator Taura Stinson for “Mudbound,” the harrowing Netflix film about a black family in the Jim Crow-era South for which Blige received both Oscar and Golden Globe nominations for her acting as well as her singing.

It’s a long way from the Oakland native’s first big break, which came as Sheila E’s bassist during tours as an opening act for Prince and Lionel Richie. After that band split, he returned to Oakland and formed the R&B group Tony! Toni! Tone!, which had a string of hits in the late 1980s and early 1990s (remember “Feels Good” and “If I Had No Loot”?). By
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Black Panther’: Marvel Cinematic Universe breakthrough at Oscars?

After breaking numerous box office records since its debut, triumphing at the Oscars is the only industry achievement that Marvel Studios cannot crack. But that could all change in one year’s time. The studio’s new release, “Black Panther,” is the first Oscar contender of 2018.

Black Panther” marks the first time a black superhero has lead a Marvel Cinematic Universe film. Chadwick Boseman brilliantly captures T’Challa, the newly minted king of the fictional African nation of Wakanda. Could Boseman strike a chord with the academy after failing to register for his acclaimed portrayal of James Brown in “Get on Up?”

Acting nominations have been hard to come by for superhero movies. Heath Ledger is the only person to reap a nomination (and win) for his turn as the Joker in “The Dark Knight.” But the celebrated cast of “Black Panther” should help the film be taken seriously with Oscar voters.
See full article at Gold Derby »

At The Earth’S Core – The Blu Review

Review by Roger Carpenter

Based upon the classic first novel of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ seven-book Pellucidar series and produced by British genre film company Amicus Productions, At the Earth’s Core (1976) is a star-studded tale of science fantasy complete with dinosaurs, a psychic master race of pteranodon-like monsters, and a caste-like civilization featuring a monkey-faced race who have enslaved the humans who populate the prehistoric land found inside the Earth.

Directed by Kevin Connor (The Land That Time Forgot; The People That Time Forgot; Warlords of the Deep; Motel Hell) and starring Doug McClure (The Land That Time Forgot; The People That Time Forgot; Roots; Humanoids from the Deep), the gorgeous Caroline Munro (The Spy Who Loved Me; Starcrash; Maniac), and the inimitable Peter Cushing, At the Earth’s Core is a fun, kid-oriented special effects extravaganza, with the emphasis on kid-oriented.

Though Amicus is best known for its portmanteau
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Ahmad Rashad Murders O.J. Simpson's Hollywood Comeback

  • TMZ
One of O.J. Simpson's former BFFs is giving his alleged big-screen return 2 thumbs down -- telling TMZ Sports there ain't a chance Juice gets loose in Hollywood again. We got Ahmad Rashad at Lax on Tuesday ... and it was pretty clear from the jump that he didn't wanna talk O.J. (who, fun fact, was in his wedding party, along with Bill Cosby).  But when we asked if O.J.'s rumored cameo in
See full article at TMZ »

Olivia Cole Dead at 75

Actress Olivia Cole, best known for her performances in Roots and The Women of Brewster Place, passed away on January 19. She was 75.

Cole died in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, her agent, Susie Schwarz at Sbb Partners, told Variety. Her cause of death is currently unknown.

“She was a very eccentric woman and a wonderful woman,” Schwarz said of Cole, who didn’t own a cell phone and shied away from technology.

Cole was born in Memphis, and trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London.

She returned to the U.S. in 1964 and appeared in "Romeo and Juliet" at the American Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford, Connecticut.

In 1966, Cole made her Broadway debut in a revival of "The School for Scandal" — just one of the many stage appearances during her career — and then landed a gig as Deborah Mehren on CBS soap opera The Guiding Light.

She won
See full article at We Love Soaps »

Sean Bean to Star in Sky’s Street-Racing Drama ‘Curfew’

Sean Bean to Star in Sky’s Street-Racing Drama ‘Curfew’
European pay-TV giant Sky has ordered “Curfew,” a full-throttle U.K. original set in the world of street racing. The car racers will compete in customized and weaponized vehicles as they race across the Britain in an attempt to escape the control of a totalitarian government.

Endemol Shine’s Tiger Aspect is producing alongside fledgling British drama banner Moonage. The eight-parter will launch on Sky and the satcaster’s Now TV streaming service.

The challengers in the illegal races are each drawn to the dangerous world of racing for their own desperate reasons, the producers said. Sean Bean (“Game of Thrones”) will star alongside Adrian Lester (“Riviera”), Phoebe Fox (“Blue Iguana”), and Malachi Kirby (“Roots”).
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Sean Bean & Malachi Kirby Team Up For ‘Fast And The Furious’-Style Drama

Game of Thrones star Sean Bean and Roots star Malachi Kirby are among the big names attached to Sky's Fast and the Furious-style drama Curfew as the British broadcaster continues to drip out programming announcements. The eight-part drama, which follows the story of ordinary people competing in the world's fastest, most furious, illegal night-time street race, is produced by Tiger Aspect Productions and Moonage Picturs, the indie set up by Peaky Blinders execs Will Gould…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Olivia Cole, Emmy-Winning ‘Roots’ Actress, Dies at 75

  • The Wrap
Olivia Cole, Emmy-Winning ‘Roots’ Actress, Dies at 75
Olivia Cole, the Emmy-winning star of the original “Roots” miniseries, has died at the age of 45. The actress died on Friday at her home in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, according to her agent Susie Schwarz of Sdb Partners. Born November 26, 1942 in Memphis, Tennessee, Cole got her start in acting on the CBS soap “Guiding Light” in 1969. Her breakout role, however, came a few years later on the hit ABC miniseries “Roots” in 1977. Also Read: Mark E Smith, Singer of The Fall, Dies at 60 For her work as Mathilda, the wife of Ben Vereen’s “Chicken George” Moore, Cole won...
See full article at The Wrap »

Olivia Cole, ‘Roots’ and ‘Women of Brewster Place’ Co-Star, Dies at 75

Olivia Cole, ‘Roots’ and ‘Women of Brewster Place’ Co-Star, Dies at 75
Actress Olivia Cole, best known for her performances in “Roots” and “The Women of Brewster Place,” has died. She was 75.

Cole died Jan. 19 in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, her agent, Susie Schwarz at Sbb Partners, told Variety. Her cause of death is currently unknown.

“She was a very eccentric woman and a wonderful woman,” Schwarz said of Cole, who didn’t own a cell phone and shied away from technology.

Cole was born in Memphis, Tenn., and trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London.

She won a supporting actress Emmy Award for her performance as Matilda in the 1977 miniseries “Roots.” Cole also received an Emmy nomination for her lead performance as real-life presidential maid Maggie Rogers in “Backstairs at the White House.”

In 1989, she starred alongside Oprah in the TV miniseries “The Women of Brewster Place,” based on Gloria Naylor’s book of the same name. Her television
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Olivia Cole, Actress in 'Roots' and 'Backstairs at the White House,' Dies at 75

Olivia Cole, Actress in 'Roots' and 'Backstairs at the White House,' Dies at 75
Olivia Cole, the Emmy-winning actress best known for her performances in the 1970s miniseries Backstairs at the White House and Roots, has died. She was 75.

Cole died Friday at her home in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, her agent, Susie Schwarz at Sdb Partners, told The Hollywood Reporter. No cause of death was immediately available.

Cole also portrayed the gossipy Miss Sophie alongside Oprah Winfrey on the 1989 ABC miniseries The Women of Brewster Place and on a subsequent, short-lived series.

Cole received her supporting actress Emmy for her turn as Matilda — the wife of Ben Vereen's Chicken...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Olivia Cole, Actress in 'Roots' and 'Backstairs at the White House,' Dies at 75

Olivia Cole, Actress in 'Roots' and 'Backstairs at the White House,' Dies at 75
Olivia Cole, the Emmy-winning actress best known for her performances in the 1970s miniseries Backstairs at the White House and Roots, has died. She was 75.

Cole died Friday at her home in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, her agent, Susie Schwarz at Sdb Partners, told The Hollywood Reporter. The New York Times reported that she had suffered a heart attack.

Cole also portrayed the gossipy Miss Sophie alongside Oprah Winfrey on the 1989 ABC miniseries The Women of Brewster Place and on a subsequent, short-lived series.

Cole received her supporting actress Emmy for her turn as Matilda...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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