6.8/10
3,759
46 user 32 critic

The Seven-Per-Cent Solution (1976)

PG | | Adventure, Crime, Drama | May 1977 (UK)
Clip
2:02 | Clip

On Disc

at Amazon

To treat his friend's cocaine induced delusions, Watson lures Sherlock Holmes to Sigmund Freud.

Director:

Herbert Ross

Writers:

Nicholas Meyer (screenplay), Nicholas Meyer (novel) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

More Like This 

Mystery | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Sherlock Holmes investigates the murders commited by Jack the Ripper and discovers a conspiracy to protect the killer.

Director: Bob Clark
Stars: Christopher Plummer, James Mason, David Hemmings
Comedy | Mystery | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

In a Manhattan psychiatric hospital a man, convinced he is Sherlock Holmes, is treated by a female doctor who happens to be named Watson.

Director: Anthony Harvey
Stars: George C. Scott, Joanne Woodward, Jack Gilford
Tomorrow (1972)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

A lonely farmer takes in a pregnant woman and looks after her. After she gives birth, tragedy strikes.

Director: Joseph Anthony
Stars: Robert Duvall, Olga Bellin, Sudie Bond
Comedy | Crime | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A drunken Sherlock Holmes is really just a cover for the real detective - Dr Watson.

Director: Thom Eberhardt
Stars: Michael Caine, Ben Kingsley, Jeffrey Jones
Adventure | Comedy | Crime
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

When a bored Holmes eagerly takes the case of Gabrielle Valladon after an attempt on her life, the search for her missing husband leads to Loch Ness and the legendary monster.

Director: Billy Wilder
Stars: Robert Stephens, Christopher Lee, Colin Blakely
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Alan Arkin ... Dr. Sigmund Freud
Vanessa Redgrave ... Lola Deveraux
Robert Duvall ... Dr. John H. Watson
Nicol Williamson ... Sherlock Holmes
Laurence Olivier ... Professor James Moriarty (as Sir Laurence Olivier)
Joel Grey ... Lowenstein
Samantha Eggar ... Mary Morstan Watson
Jeremy Kemp ... Baron Karl von Leinsdorf
Charles Gray ... Mycroft Holmes
Régine ... Madame
Georgia Brown ... Frau Freud
Anna Quayle ... Freda
Jill Townsend ... Mrs. Holmes
John Bird John Bird ... Berger
Alison Leggatt Alison Leggatt ... Mrs. Hudson
Edit

Storyline

Concerned about his friend's cocaine use, Dr. Watson tricks Sherlock Holmes into travelling to Vienna, where Holmes enters the care of Sigmund Freud. Freud attempts to solve the mysteries of Holmes' subconscious, while Holmes devotes himself to solving a mystery involving the kidnapping of Lola Deveraux. Written by James Meek <james@oz.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Sherlock Holmes meets Sigmund Freud See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English | German | French

Release Date:

May 1977 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Kein Koks für Sherlock Holmes See more »

Filming Locations:

Austria See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Bernard Herrmann was slated to compose this score but died the December before the film was completed. He had gone as far as to suggest to director Ross a musical beginning where, as the credits roll, the camera slowly dollies toward a performing orchestra, eventually finishing with a closeup of Holmes as one of the violinists. Herrmann's idea was to imply this is what Holmes did during his absence. Ross chose to use a different start. See more »

Goofs

Watson, Holmes. Freud and the Orient Express line all refer to the train destination as Istanbul. However, Continental usage and railroad usage would have used the formal name "Constantinople" until the fall of the Ottoman Empire. Previously, although it had been referred to as Istanbul by locals, it was an informal name meaning "the city." It would never have been used thus by Holmes, Watson, Freud or the railroad. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dr. John H. Watson: [Watson rings the doorbell of 221-B Baker Street] It was October the 24th, in the year 1891. that I heard for the first time in four months from my friend Sherlock Holmes. On this particular day, a telegram from his landlady, Mrs. Hudson, had been delivered to my surgery, imploring me to return to my former rooms without delay.
Mrs. Hudson: [Mrs. Hudson opens the front door] Oh, Dr. Watson, thank heavens you've come; I'm at my wit's end.
Dr. John H. Watson: Why, what has happened?
Mrs. Hudson: Since you left us these last few ...
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

In the opening titles, there are footnotes concerning many of the characters. See more »


Soundtracks

Project No.1
(uncredited)
Music by Don Banks
Berry Music Library Ltd
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Imaginative variation on the Holmes legend
13 January 2002 | by Debra SmithSee all my reviews

While the Seven Percent Solution may not appeal all fans of the legendary detective, it nevertheless gives us an interesting variation of the Conan Doyle character.

In order to cure his friend of his cocaine addiction, Dr. Watson (Robert Duvall) and brother Mycroft create a ruse to get Holmes to Vienna where Holmes(Nicol Williamson) meets Dr. Sigmund Freud (Alan Arkin). Arkin's Dr. Freud shows his own skills as a detective in a plot involving a kidnapped singer (Vanessa Redgrave).

Holmes and Freud work very well togeather. Freud points out that as a doctor he uses many of the same skills that Holmes uses in fighting crime, and in one scene demonstrates the same powers of observation and reasoning, while being careful not to upstage the great detective. There is not much mystery here, but the chemistry between Holmes and Freud keeps the movie interesting.

The clever twist concerns Holmes' archenemy Prof. Moriaity. Here we see Moriarty not as the villian, but as a timid schoolteacher harassed by Holmes because of a dark event in the lives of Sherlock and Mycroft.

This is a movie that is good fun. The only problem is that Dr. Watson isn't used very well. Freud makes a much better partner to Holmes.


29 of 35 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 46 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Comedy Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular comedy titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed