6.1/10
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19 user 11 critic

End of the Game (1975)

Der Richter und sein Henker (original title)
When a Swiss cop is murdered, a veteran homicide inspector and a rookie are assigned to solve the case but they are obstructed by interfering Swiss politicians.

Director:

Maximilian Schell

Writers:

Friedrich Dürrenmatt (screenplay), Maximilian Schell (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
3 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jon Voight ... Walter Tschanz (as John Voight)
Jacqueline Bisset ... Anna Crawley
Martin Ritt ... Hans Bärlach
Robert Shaw ... Richard Gastmann
Helmut Qualtinger ... Oskar von Schwendi
Friedrich Dürrenmatt Friedrich Dürrenmatt ... Lamont Friedrich
Lil Dagover ... Gastmann's Mother
Gabriele Ferzetti ... Dr. Lucius Lutz
Rudolf Hubacher Rudolf Hubacher ... Bodyguard 1
Rudolf Hunsperger Rudolf Hunsperger ... Bodyguard 2
Norbert Schiller ... Dr. Samuel Hungertobel
Rita Calderoni Rita Calderoni ... Nadine
Guido Cerniglia Guido Cerniglia ... Coroner
Willy Hügli Willy Hügli ... Alphons Clenin
Margarete Schell Noé Margarete Schell Noé ... Frau Schönler
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Storyline

While investigating a high-profile murder case, a savvy but unorthodox veteran police inspector has to cope with a bad conscience, bad health, an overzealous partner, a timid superior and interference from political interests. This is an existential whodunit, but a good one, and like any good whodunit, ends with a very surprising conclusion, which will be spoiled for you if you read much of anything at all about the movie. Written by LD

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

"I could murder her in front of your eyes and you couldn't prove it," said the master criminal to the master detective. And so the game began...


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the German copy end credits, Jon Voight is spelled John Voight. See more »

Quotes

Hans Bärlach: Sometimes we imagine things; sometimes things happen in our minds; sometimes they happen in reality. It is our job as policemen Walter to separate them, then maybe, maybe we have a chance to stumble on the truth. Maybe soon.
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Crazy Credits

Corpse provided by Donald Sutherland See more »

Alternate Versions

When the film was released internationally it was cut by 15 minutes. For unknown reasons, only the shorter international version has ever been released on home video. Both versions have a full soundtrack in English. The following sequences are missing in the shorter cut: 01 - After Baerlach visits Mrs. Schoenler there is a brief scene in which we see him feeding bears at a zoo. He then goes to the town hall and sees Gastmann from afar. This prompts a brief flashback of Nadine's corpse floating in the river. Baerlach talks to Lutz and asks him for a new partner. He wants Tschanz. Lutz says Tschanz is on holiday but Baerlach insists. Baerlach lights a cigar and is taken over by a coughing fit, Lutz asks for a glass of water but the secretary brings a flower. Lutz finally agrees to assign Tschanz to him and notes that they will make a great team. Baerlach thanks him and leaves. 02 - During the funeral scene there's an additional shot. After Tschanz notices the name on the wreath is wrong we see a woman's hat falling off and one of the mourners pick it up and throw it onto the coffin. The sound of the woman gasping can still be heard on the soundtrack when the trombonist empties water from his instrument in the short version instead of the correct sound of water pouring out. That shot is followed by another shot missing from the shorter cut in which a uniformed policeman congratulates Lutz on his speech. 03 - The first scene with Anna and Tschanz is a little different. They are first seen lying naked on the floor in silence. She gets up, lights a cigarette, and says "Don't think about it, it was good. I wanted that". She then walks over to the bathroom. In the shorter cut, the line is dubbed over the close-up of Anna and Tschanz and then cuts directly into Anna in the bathroom. 04 - There is another brief moment missing from the shorter cut in this sequence. After Anna says "Call me" Tschanz says "I hate telephones. I'd rather stand in front of your house and wait for you". There is a short discussion and she tells him to go. The scene then proceeds like in the shorter cut with Tschanz asking "Who are they". 05 - Right after the scene in which Baerlach returns home and takes off the arm protector Tschanz is seen in a phone box. He calls Anna but she isn't at home. 06 - After the "Dr. Lutz, the minister is expecting you" line, Tschanz is seen lying in bed looking sick and calling Anna's house again but no one answers. 07 - After Tschanz runs out of the baggage loading area there are two brief shots of Gastmann's henchmen watching him hidden behind crates. 08 - The sequence in which Tschanz and Anna are walking next to the river is longer. In the shorter version the scene ends after Tschanz asks Anna about Baerlach's suspicions but in the longer cut they continue talking. Anna tells Tschanz she wants him to be kind and talk to her. They talk about their families and she tells him he needs to grow up and be kind. Tschanz goes into the playground and starts playing football with the kids. Anna smiles at him. 09 - The entire sequence in which Baerlach leaves and is arguing with Tschanz and is then picked up by Gastmann as well as the entire sequence on the bridge in which they discuss their "game" and in which Gastmann disposes of the dead driver takes place at night. The sequence was originally shot day-for-night but the effect was removed in the shorter version. The scene is exactly the same bar one short insert. When Gastmann's henchman throws the driver's body in the water there is a short flashback of Nadine's corpse floating as seen in the Istanbul intro. 10 - After Gastmannshouts at Baerlach ("You fool") we see Tschanz lying in bed thinking. Then we see Anna emerging from the shower and getting dressed. Then we see Tschanz entering her house. Anna walks into her living room and sees him. He tells her he loves her and forces himself on her. She struggles but eventually says "Alright, if you want me you can have me. But you can't HAVE me. Understand?". She then tells him Robert has more power over her than ever before. They talk briefly and Tschanz concludes she never loved anyone. She is then seen leaving by car. See more »


Soundtracks

Death and the Maiden
Written by Franz Schubert
[played by brass band at Schmied's funeral]
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User Reviews

 
The book is even better, but untranslated.
14 July 1999 | by mirko-2See all my reviews

I saw the movie a long time ago, in a class in (German) highschool. I remember being mesmerized by the book for which I can not find a translation in English. It's one of the greatest whodunits of all movie history. Baerlach the old Police Kommissaire has one more year to live due to illness just when a policeman is found dead on a country road near his native Swiss town. Baerlach lets his over-eager deputy Tschanz handle the investigation, knowing full well it will lead Tschanz to an old nemesis of Baerlach's, a criminal that he could never get his hands on. The investigations seem to be unsuccessful, but Baerlach knows something that Tschanz doesn't, and has a plan.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

West Germany | Italy

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 May 1978 (West Germany) See more »

Also Known As:

End of the Game See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

MFG-Film, T.R.A.C. See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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