6.9/10
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Next Stop, Greenwich Village (1976)

The ups and downs of life as experienced by a group of aspiring young artists in the early Fifties New York.

Director:

Paul Mazursky

Writer:

Paul Mazursky
Reviews
Nominated for 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 5 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Lenny Baker ... Larry Lapinsky
Shelley Winters ... Mom / Faye Lapinsky
Ellen Greene ... Sarah Roth
Lois Smith ... Anita Cunningham
Christopher Walken ... Robert Fulmer (as Chris Walken)
Dori Brenner Dori Brenner ... Connie
Antonio Fargas ... Bernstein Chandler
Lou Jacobi ... Herb
Mike Kellin ... Ben Lapinsky
Michael Egan Michael Egan ... Herbert Berghof - Acting Coach
Rashel Novikoff Rashel Novikoff ... Mrs. Tupperman (as Rachel Novikoff)
John C. Becher ... Sid Weinberg - Casting Director
Jeff Goldblum ... Clyde Baxter
Joe Spinell ... Cop at El Station (as Joe Spinnell)
Denise Galik ... Ellen
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Storyline

An aspiring Jewish actor moves out of his parents' Brooklyn apartment to seek his fortune in the bohemian life of Greenwich Village in 1953. He struggles to come to terms with his feelings about his mother's overbearing nature, while also trying to maintain his relationship with his girlfriend. Written by scgary66

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

1953 Was a Good Year for Leaving Home See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Cast and crew who worked on both 'Next Stop, Greenwich Village' (1976) and 'The Pope of Greenwich Village' (1984) (both unrelated pictures but share ''Greenwich Village'' titles) included at least one person - Gui Andrisano - who played Marco in the earlier movie and was a choreographer on the latter film. See more »

Goofs

Set in 1953 but the soundtrack features Dave Brubeck's '"Blue Rondo a la Turk" first recorded in 1959. See more »

Quotes

Faye Lapinsky: [as Larry is leaving, on his way to Hollywood for his first film role] Larry... be a good actor.
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Connections

References The Gunfighter (1950) See more »

Soundtracks

Little Brown Jug
Written by Joseph Winner (uncredited)
Arranged by Bill Finegan (uncredited)
Performed by Glenn Miller and His Orchestra
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User Reviews

 
A FILM TRIBUTE TO A VERY SPECIAL PLACE AND TIME
3 March 2002 | by sataft-2See all my reviews

During June of 1954 in New York City, I graduated junior high school and, to celebrate the event, joined three of my classmates on a forbidden sojourn to the city's famous Greenwich Village. Exiting the subway station at Christopher street, we were amazed at the apparent ordinariness of this place we'd heard so much about from older adolescents and adults.

In fact, at first glance, nothing extraordinary seemed to be happening there, with the sole exception of more White people being present than four Black teenagers from Harlem were were accustomed to seeing.

For you see, this was the mid 1950's, Dr. Martin Luthor King Jr. had as yet to lead any freedom marches, Southern schools were as yet to be integrated, and in many Southern states Black people were lynched on Saturday nights as town entertainment. But three hours later, we knew that everything we'd heard about Greenwich Village was true and more. For this was a place far ahead of it's time.

In the Greenwich Village of the 1950's, racial integration had been in place for well over two decades. But far more important, forbidden talk of sexual liberation, interracial sex, homosexuality, along with political, artistic and literary freedom at all levels were openly discussed, flouted and displayed for all to see; performed to a background mixture of new age Jazz, early Rock and Roll and Folk Music. Virtually nothing was excluded from the social or musical menu this incredible place had to offer.

I can't speak for the rest of my friends on that day, but I immediately fell in love with the place and remained so, until it's untimely demise at the hands of the high rise-high priced real estate industry toward the mid 1970's. By then, the people who had made the place justifiably famous and notorious for what it was, could no longer afford to live there. So the Village remained,in name only, as it is today: a mere shadow of what it used to be.

Joyfully, director Paul Mazursky has managed to capture on film, a moving snapshot of the social life and time of a remarkable neighborhood, in what was probably the last fifteen to twenty years of it's legitimate life. And I do remember it so well. The rent parties for starving (sometimes talented) artists, the ubiquitous book shops, the coffee houses featuring impromptu poetry readings, the fashion statements (or blatant lack thereof), the mixing and making of all sorts of colorful characters who, even in their farcical attempts to parody themselves, were more alive and real then those who would put them down. This was the Greenwich Village of the 1950's and of legend.

This magical place was for me and many others (as was for the director who produced this film as an ode to his time there), our first real awakening and taste of adult life. And far more important, a fortuitous preparation for the new social order that was, in time, to come.

The place, as it was, is truly deserving of this wonderful little gem of a film.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 February 1976 (Canada) See more »

Also Known As:

Next Stop, Greenwich Village See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Twentieth Century Fox See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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