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'Star Trek: Discovery' co-creator Alex Kurtzman, CBS extend production deal

'Star Trek: Discovery' co-creator Alex Kurtzman, CBS extend production deal
Kurtzman to develop new series for broadcast, cable, streaming.

TV and film multi-hyphenate Alex Kurtzman has extended his production deal with CBS Television Studios for five years and is set to expand the Star Trek franchise on TV through new series, mini-series and animated content.

Kurtzman is co-creator of Star Trek: Discovery, the 2017 spin-off series from the long-running sci-fi franchise produced for Us streaming service CBS All Access. He was a writer and executive producer on 2009 franchise reboot feature Star Trek and a writer and producer on 2013 feature Star Trek: Into Darkness.

The second season of Star Trek: Discovery is currently in production,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

20 Best Heady Sci-Fi Films: Part 1

  • Cinelinx
In honor of the 50th anniversary of 2001: A Space Odyssey, we make our picks for the best cerebral science fiction films of all time. Here are picks #20 - 11.

The job of science fiction is to push boundaries. Indeed, the very description of science fiction suggests going a bit further than established fact. Science fiction is supposed to build on the known world around us. It is supposed to explore the unknown. When science fiction is at its best, this exploration is being fueled by our own human condition. The reason we are exploring outward is because there is an uncertainty inside. We feel incomplete in some regard, and the answers might be out there.

Science fiction films that can best communicate the relationship between the universe and our own minds tend to be the films that leave a lasting impression. This is my pick for the 20 films that do the best job of this.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Filmed Version of David Bowie’s ‘Lazarus’ Musical to Premiere With Live Band

Filmed Version of David Bowie’s ‘Lazarus’ Musical to Premiere With Live Band
“Lazarus,” the stage musical written by David Bowie with Enda Walsh in the months before his death in January 2016, will receive a special premiere on May 2 at the Kings Theatre in Brooklyn, New York. For one night only, the theatrical premiere of a film based on the show’s London production will be soundtracked by the seven-piece band that backed Michael C. Hall and the show’s cast beginning on December 7, 2015 in New York. Tickets for the show go on sale Tuesday.

“Lazarus” features nearly 20 songs spanning the Bowie catalogue, rearranged by the artist with Henry Hey. Songs include the hits “Heroes,” “Changes” and “Life On Mars?,” album cuts like “Always Crashing in the Same Car” and “It’s No Game (Part 1),” and four songs written specifically for the show (“Lazarus,” “No Plan,” “Killing a Little Time,” “When I Met You”). The Kings Theatre presentation will mark the first time
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Robert Altman’s Images (1972) Available on Blu-ray From Arrow Academy March 20th

Robert Altman’s Images (1972) starring Susannah York will be available on Blu-ray From Arrow Academy March 20th

The early seventies were a period of remarkable activity for Robert Altman, producing masterpiece after masterpiece. At the time he came to make Images, Mash and McCabe & Mrs. Miller were behind him, with The Long Goodbye, California Split and Nashville still to come.

Originally conceived in the mid-sixties, Images concerns a pregnant children s author (Susannah York, who won the Best Actress award at the Cannes Film Festival) whose husband (Rene Auberjonois) may or may not be having an affair. While on vacation in Ireland, her mental state becomes increasingly unstable resulting in paranoia, hallucinations and visions of a doppelgänger.

Scored by an Oscar-nominated John Williams, with sounds by Stomu Yamash’ta (The Man Who Fell to Earth), Images also boasts the remarkable cinematography of Vilmos Zsigmond (Close Encounters of the Third Kind
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

11 of David Bowie’s Most Iconic Film and TV Roles (Videos)

  • The Wrap
11 of David Bowie’s Most Iconic Film and TV Roles (Videos)
From “Labyrinth” to “The Prestige,” David Bowie’s onscreen roles added another dimension to a legendary career. “The Man Who Fell to Earth” Bowie’s first leading role was in 1976’s “The Man Who Fell to Earth” as an alien who comes to Earth to bring water back to his home planet. Bowie later admitted he was abusing cocaine while filming the movie. “The Hunger” Starring alongside Catherine Deneuve and Susan Sarandon, Bowie played a vampire in the 1983 cult classic “The Hunger.” “Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence” An adaptation of the Laurens van der Post novel “The Seed and the Sower,
See full article at The Wrap »

10 Best TV Shows to See in January: Bowie, Versace and Serial Killers

10 Best TV Shows to See in January: Bowie, Versace and Serial Killers
It's a New Year, which means one thing, and one thing only: A new batch of TV shows to dig into. (Ok, it may mean more than one thing.) Emmy winner Lena Waithe debuts her Showtime series about growing up on Chicago's South Side; J.K. Simmons does Starz double duty in a thriller with a sci-fi hook; Steven Soderbergh casually revolutionizes the television format with a twisty HBO murder mystery; Dakota Fanning tracks down a 19th-century serial killer for TBS. See, there's something for everyone. Here's what you need to
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Bernie Casey, Fan-Favorite Actor and NFL Star, Passes Away at 78

  • MovieWeb
Bernie Casey, Fan-Favorite Actor and NFL Star, Passes Away at 78
Bernie Casey, the former NFL star turned actor, has died at the age of 78. The actor was best known for his roles in movies like Revenge of the Nerds and I'm Gonna Git you Sucka. Casey died of an illness in a Los Angeles hospital, but the specific illness has not yet been revealed.

A rep for Bernie Casey confirmed the news of his death to People, saying that he passed away with his family and loved ones by his side. The actor had spent the last few days at the hospital after coming down with an illness before passing away. His work in Hollywood spanned nearly four decades, with his final credited role being in 2007's Vegas Vampires.

Before transitioning into his life as a professional actor, Bernie Casey was a decorated and talented athlete. In his younger years, Casey was a record-breaking track and field athlete at Bowling Green University.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Bernie Casey Has Passed Away

  • DailyDead
From the football field to the film lots, Bernie Casey left an indelible impression with a presence that couldn't be ignored, and we're sad to share the news that the actor has passed away at the age of 78.

According to multiple outlets, including THR, Casey passed away after a "brief illness" at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Before he entered the world of movies, Casey was a star in his own right as a track and field standout at Bowling Green State University. After making it to the finals of the 1960 United States Olympic Trials, Casey was a first round draft pick for the San Francisco 49ers and would go on to play eight years in the NFL as a wide receiver, raking in 40 touchdowns and over 5,000 receiving yards.

With his life as a professional athlete behind him in the late 1960s, Casey turned his attention to acting,
See full article at DailyDead »

Bernie Casey, ‘Revenge of the Nerds’ Actor and Former NFL Player, Dies at 78

Bernie Casey, ‘Revenge of the Nerds’ Actor and Former NFL Player, Dies at 78
Bernie Casey, the former NFL star known for his work in the films “Boxcar Bertha” and “Revenge of the Nerds,” died on Tuesday in Los Angeles after a brief illness, Variety has confirmed. He was 78.

Casey made his film debut in the 1969 sequel “Guns of the Magnificent Seven.” He then acted alongside fellow former NFL star Jim Brown in the crime dramas “…tick…tick…tick…” and “Black Gunn.” He played the title role in the 1972 science fiction TV film “Gargoyles,” and then portrayed Tamara Dobson’s love interest in 1973’s “Cleopatra Jones.”

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Casey wrote, directed, produced, and starred in “The Dinner,” a 1997 film centering on three black men who discuss slavery, black self-loathing, and homophobia. That same year, he loosely portrayed a version George Jackson, a member of the Black Panther Party who was killed, in the drama “Brothers.”

In Martin Scorsese’s “Boxcar Bertha,” he
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Musician to Movie Star: In the Footsteps of Elvis

With the recent 40th anniversary of the death of Elvis, here is a look at those music stars who made a transition to film. Some were more successful than others. Some made a fleeting crossover and some are best forgotten as far as their film careers went…

In terms of the King, Elvis has an undoubtedly huge legacy as far as music goes. His influence as far as attitude, showmanship and indeed the music itself is still being felt. He was in that bracket of the most influential musical acts of his era alongside the Beatles. However his impact on film was also important. He showed that a cultural phenomenon could operate over two platforms.

Beginning in 1956 with Love Me Tender, Elvis would go onto make over 30 films until 1969. A few more iconic than others of course, such as Jailhouse Rock, Viva Las Vegas and some more interesting attempts to
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Cannes Review: ‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’ is an Alienating Misfire

John Cameron Mitchell is a more-than-talented writer-director whose first three features (Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Shortbus, and Rabbit Hole) have all contributed to making him a distinct voice in American cinema. Perhaps it can be attributed to a slimming movie market, or maybe that there just wasn’t anything developing creatively for him, but he hasn’t directed a feature in seven years. If How to Talk to Girls at Parties is what he perceived as a comeback vehicle, Mitchell made an ill-suited choice, as his latest film offers a thinly-sketched culture clash that misses the romanticism of its source material.

Based on the 2006 short story by novelist Neil Gaiman, How to Talk to Girls at Parties is both an ode to punk rock and to 1970s sci-fi, especially 1976’s The Man Who Fell to Earth. The film tells the story of Enn (Alex Sharp), a punk enthusiast who
See full article at The Film Stage »

Inside the Quad by Anne-Katrin Titze

The Last Emperor composers David Byrne and Ryuichi Sakamoto had a Forbidden Colors conversation at the Quad Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

At the Quad Cinema - Jim Jarmusch's Stranger Than Paradise; Nicolas Roeg's The Man Who Fell To Earth; Mitchell Leisen's Hold Back The Dawn; Elia Kazan's America, America; Werner Herzog's Stroszek; Sergio Leone's Once Upon A Time In America, Slava Tsukerman's Liquid Sky with Anne Carlisle become Immigrant Songs. Retrospectives for Goldie Hawn, Frank Perry & Eleanor Perry, Bertrand Tavernier and Ryuichi Sakamoto; a Rainer Werner Fassbinder Lola First Encounter with Sandra Bernhard, Jean-Luc Godard's King Lear and a drop of Nathan Silver's Thirst Street come up in my conversation with Director of Programming C Mason Wells.

Bernardo Bertolucci's The Last Emperor at China: Through The Looking Glass Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Grandmaster director Wong Kar Wai chose a clip from
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

NYC Weekend Watch: Marcello Mastroianni, The Caan Film Festival, Terry Zwigoff, Immigrants on Film & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

“Il Bello Marcello” highlights Italy’s greatest actor and, in turn, its greatest filmmakers.

Stalker continues its run.

Museum of the Moving Image

The Caan Film Festival is underway! Films from Michael Mann, Coppola, Hawks, and more kick it off.

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari plays on Sunday.

Metrograph

A
See full article at The Film Stage »

Todd Haynes’ Cinematic Voice: Stream 7 Classic Films That Shaped The Filmmaker

Todd Haynes’ Cinematic Voice: Stream 7 Classic Films That Shaped The Filmmaker
Editor’s Note: This article is presented in partnership with FilmStruck. The exclusive streaming home for The Criterion Collection, FilmStruck features the largest streaming library of contemporary and classic arthouse, indie, foreign and cult films as well as extensive bonus content, filmmaker interviews and rare footage. Learn more here.

Todd Haynes is one of the most distinct voices working in film today. He’s also a cinematic chameleon. For every period film Haynes makes, he and his team of craftsman adapt not only the look of the movies or photography of that era, but the visual language as well.

For example, both “Carol” and “Far from Heaven” are Haynes films set in ’50s-era America, but they are worlds apart. While “Carol” got its color palette and sense of composition from the photographers like Saul Leiter who documented the period, “Far From Heaven” recreated the manufactured studio look of Douglas Sirk’s melodramas of that era.
See full article at Indiewire »

David Bowie and the Indestructible Metaphors of Mirror Scenes

A video essay examines our most private moments.

Strap on your thinking caps for this one, film fans, because it’s a doozy.

According to director Nicolas Roeg (The Man Who Fell to Earth, Don’t Look Now, The Witches), mirrors are cinema in all its glory and in fact the essence of the medium. See, mirrors are the only time we truly look at ourselves; photographs of us are from other perspectives, for other people or posterity, and as such we don’t show our real faces in them, we show projections of who we think we should be or how we think we should feel in a certain situation. But the mirror isn’t public, it’s private, it is us alone with ourselves and thus the way we look into mirrors, into ourselves, is different from every other face we show the world.

The mirror is an eye, Roeg
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

The Space Between Us review – cosmically mawkish teen romance

This tale of interplanetary young love falls apart upon take-off with a storyline that offers no surprises and fetishises its protagonist’s debilitating illness

Here is a love story that quickly turns into an insufferable display of sucrose interplanetary Ya ickiness with the most guessable final twist of all time. It features a near-future space travel plot with an awful lot of corporate promotional branding from Nasa – like Ridley Scott’s The Martian but without that movie’s occasional sense of humour. There’s a persistent emo-fetishisation of illness, in the person of a teen visitor from Mars and his romantic infirmity. But it’s not so much The Man Who Fell to Earth as The Fault in Our Stars. Asa Butterfield steps up to his first adult lead as Gardner, whose astronaut mom died giving birth to him 16 years ago, en route to Mars. Since then, he’s been
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Man Who Fell To Earth Falls to Earth on Limited Collector’s Edition Blu-ray January 24th

“Television. The strange thing about television is that it – doesn’t *tell* you everything. It *shows* you everything about life on Earth, but the true mysteries remain. Perhaps it’s in the nature of television. Just waves in space.”

Relive the imaginative cult classic, The Man Who Fell To Earth, starring international icon David Bowie, when the Limited Collector’s Edition arrives on Blu-ray Combo Pack (plus Digital HD) January 24 from Lionsgate Home Entertainment.

Relive the imaginative and compelling cult classic, The Man Who Fell to Earth, when the Limited Collector’s Edition arrives on Blu-ray Combo Pack (plus Digital HD) January 24 from Lionsgate. International icon David Bowie stars in his unforgettable debut role as an alien who has ventured to Earth on a mission to save his planet from a catastrophic drought. In honor of David Bowie’s legacy, the limited collector’s edition Blu-ray Combo Pack includes never-before-seen interviews,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

David Bowie Remembered: Early Photos Show His Many Personas

David Bowie Remembered: Early Photos Show His Many Personas
David Bowie had a rarely-equalled streak of musically innovative output in the 1970s, though he continued to make music right up until his death on Jan. 10, 2016. A posthumous Ep was released this week for the one-year anniversary of his death, including the song “Lazarus” which also appears on his final album “Blackstar,” in addition to his final recordings “No Plan,” “Killing a Little Time” and “When I Met You.”

In just four years from 1971 to 1974, he released the indelible albums “Hunky Dory,” “The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars,” “Aladdin Sane” and “Diamond Dogs.”

Born David Jones, he started his career in the early 1960s playing acoustic guitar and appearing in theater and mime productions while crafting the wildly imaginative image that became his trademark. These photos from Britain’s Rex agency, some of them rarely published, show Bowie at his most glamorous, fashionable, thoughtful
See full article at Variety - Film News »

11 of David Bowie’s Most Iconic Film and TV Roles (Videos)

  • The Wrap
11 of David Bowie’s Most Iconic Film and TV Roles (Videos)
From “Labyrinth” to “The Prestige,” David Bowie’s onscreen roles added another dimension to a legendary career. “The Man Who Fell to Earth” Bowie’s first leading role was in 1976’s “The Man Who Fell to Earth” as an alien who comes to Earth to bring water back to his home planet. Bowie later admitted he was abusing cocaine while filming the movie. “The Hunger” Starring alongside Catherine Deneuve and Susan Sarandon, Bowie played a vampire in the 1983 cult classic “The Hunger.” “Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence” An adaptation of the Laurens van der Post novel “The Seed and the Sower,
See full article at The Wrap »

David Bowie’s Mysterious ‘No Plan’ Music Video Released in Honor of His 70th Birthday

David Bowie’s Mysterious ‘No Plan’ Music Video Released in Honor of His 70th Birthday
Happy birthday to a music legend.

David Bowie‘s final recordings were released as a surprise Ep called No Plan on Sunday, what would have been the musician’s 70th birthday. A music video for the track “No Plan” also debuted.

The video, directed by Tom Hingston, shows rows of televisions with static screens in the display of a store called Newton Electrical – a nod to Bowie’s character in the 1976 film The Man Who Fell to Earth and Lazarus, the Bowie-penned musical based on the movie. The TVs display the lyrics to the song as well as images such
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
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