A bureaucrat rents a Paris apartment where he finds himself drawn into a rabbit hole of dangerous paranoia.

Director:

Roman Polanski

Writers:

Roland Topor (novel), Gérard Brach (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Popularity
4,987 ( 344)
2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Roman Polanski ... Trelkovsky
Isabelle Adjani ... Stella
Melvyn Douglas ... Monsieur Zy
Jo Van Fleet ... Madame Dioz
Bernard Fresson ... Scope
Lila Kedrova ... Madame Gaderian
Claude Dauphin ... Husband at the accident
Claude Piéplu ... Neighbor (as Claude Pieplu)
Rufus ... Georges Badar
Romain Bouteille Romain Bouteille ... Simon
Jacques Monod Jacques Monod ... Cafe Owner
Patrice Alexsandre Patrice Alexsandre ... Robert
Jean-Pierre Bagot Jean-Pierre Bagot ... Policeman
Josiane Balasko ... Viviane - Office Worker
Michel Blanc ... Scope's Neighbor
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Storyline

In Paris, the shy bureaucrat Trelkovsky rents an old apartment without bathroom where the previous tenant, the Egyptologist Simone Choule, committed suicide. The unfriendly concierge (Shelley Winters) and the tough landlord Mr. Zy establish stringent rules of behavior and Trelkovsky feels ridden by his neighbors. Meanwhile he visits Simone in the hospital and befriends her girlfriend Stella. After the death of Simone, Trelkovsky feels obsessed for her and believes his landlord and neighbors are plotting a scheme to force him to also commit suicide. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

How could he escape from his nightmares? See more »

Genres:

Drama | Thriller

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The picture featured four Academy Award winning actors when made and released which were Lila Kedrova (Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Zorba the Greek (1964)), Jo Van Fleet (Best Actress in a Supporting Role for East of Eden (1955)), Melvyn Douglas (Best Actor in a Supporting Role for Hud (1963)), and Shelley Winters (Best Actress in a Supporting Role for both A Patch of Blue (1965) and The Diary of Anne Frank (1959)). Afterwards, Melvyn Douglas won another Oscar in the same category for Being There (1979). All of the acting Oscar winning actors appearing in this film have won their Academy Awards in Best Supporting Acting categories. Later, Polanski would win a Best Director Oscar himself for The Pianist (2002) but has not won an Oscar for acting. See more »

Goofs

When Trelkovsky is unpacking as he moves into the apartment, a crew member is reflected in the small mirror adjacent to the kitchen sink. Two crew members are then reflected in the armoire's mirror as Trelkovsky opens it. See more »

Quotes

Trelkovsky: [talking to himself]
[he opens a box and takes out a pair of shoes]
Trelkovsky: Oh! My! Where did you find these? They are beautiful! A size 68? I had *no* idea!
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Crazy Credits

The film has no end credits; only the Paramount logo. See more »

Alternate Versions

Although the UK cinema version was complete the 1986 CIC video was cut by 6 secs by the BBFC to remove a brief extract of the banned nunchaku scene from Enter the Dragon (seen by Trelkovsky and Stella during a cinema visit). The cuts were fully waived in the 2004 Paramount DVD. See more »

Connections

References Rear Window (1954) See more »

Soundtracks

Métempsychose
Written and Performed by Philippe Sarde Et Orchestre
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User Reviews

 
Paranoid Polanski in peril
15 April 2006 | by Jonny_NumbSee all my reviews

What can be said, really... "The Tenant" is a first-class thriller wrought with equal amounts of suspense and full-blown paranoia. It's an intricately-plotted film--every detail seems included for a reason--even though the plot seldom makes sense, and much of it is never even addressed in an objective manner. Therefore we are left with the increasingly unstable Trelkovsky (Polanski)--a meek Polish man who has obtained an apartment due to the previous tenant's suicide--to guide us through a world of escalating fear and uncertainty. After an apartment-warming party thrown by a group of obnoxious coworkers, Trelkovsky comes under increased, seemingly inexplicable scrutiny by the fellow occupants in his building; the rest of the film chronicles his mental deterioration and gives us a thorough mindfu*k on par with the later efforts of David Lynch. "The Tenant," however, is more brooding and sinister, laced with unexpected comic relief, fine performances, and a truly haunting score. It's a movie that's better experienced than described, so hop to it.


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Details

Country:

France | USA

Language:

French | English

Release Date:

26 May 1976 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

The Tenant See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$1,924,733

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,924,733
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Marianne Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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