8.3/10
5,129
55 user 33 critic

Harlan County U.S.A. (1976)

A heartbreaking record of the thirteen-month struggle between a community fighting to survive and a corporation dedicated to the bottom line.

Director:

Barbara Kopple
Won 1 Oscar. Another 8 wins. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
John L. Lewis ... Self - Pres., UMW, 1920-1960 (archive footage)
Carl Horn Carl Horn ... Self - Pres., Duke Power Co.
Norman Yarborough Norman Yarborough ... Self - Pres., Eastover Mining Co. (Owned by Duke Power)
Logan Patterson Logan Patterson ... Self - Chief Negotiator
Houston Elmore Houston Elmore ... Self - UMW Organizer
Phil Sparks Phil Sparks ... Self - UMW Staff
John Corcoran John Corcoran ... Self - Pres., Consolidated Coal
John O'Leary John O'Leary ... Self - Former Dir., Bureau of Mines
Donald Rasmussen Donald Rasmussen ... Self - Black Ling Clinic., W. Va (as Dr. Donald Rasmussen)
Hawley Wells Jr. Hawley Wells Jr. ... Self (as Dr. Hawley Wells Jr.)
W.A. 'Tony' Boyle W.A. 'Tony' Boyle ... Self - Pres., UMW, 1962-1972 (archive footage)
Joseph Yablonski Joseph Yablonski ... Self (archive footage) (as Joseph "Jock" Yablonski)
Chip Yablonski Chip Yablonski ... Self
Ken Yablonski Ken Yablonski ... Self
Arnold Miller Arnold Miller ... Self - Miners for Democracy Candidate
Edit

Storyline

This film documents the coal miners' strike against the Brookside Mine of the Eastover Mining Company in Harlan County, Kentucky in June, 1973. Eastovers refusal to sign a contract (when the miners joined with the United Mine Workers of America) led to the strike, which lasted more than a year and included violent battles between gun-toting company thugs/scabs and the picketing miners and their supportive women-folk. Director Barbara Kopple puts the strike into perspective by giving us some background on the historical plight of the miners and some history of the UMWA. Written by Martin Lewison <lewison+@pitt.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

When filming began, the film was intended to be about the 1972 campaign by Arnold Miller and Miners For Democracy to unseat UMWA president Tony Boyle, in the aftermath of Joseph Yablonski's murder; but the Harlan County strike began and caused the filmmakers to change their principal subject, with the campaign and murder becoming secondary subjects. See more »

Quotes

Hawley Wells Jr.: [...] that was when I learned my first real political lesson, about what happens when you take a position against the coal operators, against the capitalists... I found out that the union officials were working with the coal companies. I also found that the Catholic hierarchy was working with the coal companies. Here was a combination of the whole thing, you see: you had to bump against the whole combination of them.
See more »

Connections

Featured in Women Make Film: A New Road Movie Through Cinema (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

Cold Blooded Murder
Written and Sung by Hazel Dickens
See more »

User Reviews

A gripping reality that still exists in America.
7 May 2003 | by emma502See all my reviews

Dirt roads, no plumbing, wages lower than the standard living condition rates, abused mentally and physically by a large monopolistic corporation, and a lack of a full education are all factors that led to the strike of the minors in Harlan County. A county that time as well as the nation forgot. A county that did not progressed on beyond the persecution and disgraceful treatment of the 1930's proletariat. A county where the average man lived in constant fear that there would not be a constant and or adequate income; where the only way to see change was to unite and to revolt by any means to force people to see the intolerable conditions that they live in.

This documentary was filmed over a period of 4 years which in turn showed the lack of speed for a change from a peon work ethic to one of equality. The men of the mine saw the results that a union in other parts of the country and the standard of living that most Americans enjoyed as compared to their own situation. The community of Harlan County had a desire for change from an almost forced labor to one where the worker could make choices, have health care and to not live from pay check to pay check. The men and the woman were willing to risk everything for a better future for their children. The wives of the minors not only lived in the same conditions but had the same drive for changes and a difference. The women not only increased the numbers for picket lines but they also brought the importance of the strike to an `at home' feel. The rough terrain, harsh living community, and dirty, dingy way of life that a miner and a miner's family lived in was adequately represented in the film via the raw nature of the interviews and the in the field live spontaneous coverage. You as the viewer did not sit back and watch the film but instead were brought in to the lives of these men and woman. The filming brought a sense to the audience that you were there on the picket line, you felt the terror of being attacked, and you experienced the chaos when shots were fired at unarmed citizens. The falling of the camera and the blackness of the shot exemplifies the nature of not understanding what was going on at that moment. This in your face type of filming also show all aspects of what a strike of this nature entails. The viewer saw the aftermath and hospitalization of the battles between unarmed men and the `gun -thugs' sent to end picket lines. Like Bordwall and Thompson state the film crew used was small and more mobile, this not only rejected the traditional ideals of script and structure but also allowed the film makers to almost disappear into the back ground and let the action unfold in font of their eyes. This form of filming were there is a no holds bar or in your face tactic shows all portions of the incident, meaning that there is a feeling that the camera was never turned off. It brought light to a subject that most would not have known about, a subject that it profoundly influenced. The press that such documentaries bring to these hidden incidents carries a strong level of change and importance that otherwise would not be there. The filming of these events is intense. The film must express the telling of a complete story, one that ties the events that previously unfolded through the elapsed filming time to a coherent ending, being it either good or bad. The documentary film is a modern day form of passing on a lesson or an experience to a new audience, the modern day word of mouth story telling.


22 of 28 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 55 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Criterion | HBOMAX

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 September 1977 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Harlan County U.S.A. See more »

Filming Locations:

Brookside, Kentucky, USA See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Cabin Creek See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Black and White (archive footage)| Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed