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Gary Oldman to star in ‘Citizen Kane’ screenwriter biopic ‘Mank’

Gary Oldman has signed on the dotted line to take the lead role in the biopic of ‘Citizen Kane’ screenwriter, Herman Mankiewicz, in ‘Mank’.

Gone Girl’ directed, David Fincher has also been announced to direct the film which is said to follow Mankiewicz’s tumultuous development of the ‘Kane’ script alongside director Orson Welles. Despite its critical success, the script was the only part of the film to win an Oscar.

The script had been written by Fincher’s father Jack before he passed away in 2003. Fincher will produce alongside producing partner Cean Chaffin and Douglas Urbanski. The film will be in black and white, with production due to commence in November.

Also in news – Felicity Jones joins cast of George Clooney’s ‘Midnight

Considered by many to be the greatest film ever made, ‘Citizen Kane’ examines the life and legacy of Charles Foster Kane, played by Welles, a character
See full article at HeyUGuys »

‘The Loudest Voice’ Review: Russell Crowe’s License to Ailes

‘The Loudest Voice’ Review: Russell Crowe’s License to Ailes
Credit where credit’s due: The Loudest Voice, Showtime’s seven-part miniseries about the rise and fall of Fox News chairman/alleged chronic sexual harasser Roger Ailes, is dedicated to living up to its name. From the moment that Russell Crowe’s jowly, handsy version of the political consultant-turned-conservative kingmaker shows up in a diner, predicting how his epitaph will read — “right-wing, paranoid, fat” — you have the distinct feeling you are being yelled at. And not just by the Oscar-winning actor, though he does unleash hell via a variety of high-volume bellows,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Studio Bonanza picks up Erik Matti horror film 'Lent'

Mirovision’s new global contents division also selling O Muel’s upcoming drama ’Pamir’.

Studio Bonanza, the global contents arm of Korean sales agent Mirovision, has picked up international rights to Lent, the first horror film from Filipino filmmaker Erik Matti.

Produced by Manila-based Reality Entertainment, the film follows a college student who rushes back to the family home when he learns that his twin sister has died. But when he finds himself being violently haunted, he starts to investigate the true nature of his sister’s death.

Matti is well known internationally for On The Job (2013), which premiered in Cannes Directors Fortnight,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Saturday Night Live’ Checks in on ‘Me Too, Year Two’

  • Variety
‘Saturday Night Live’ Checks in on ‘Me Too, Year Two’
October marks the one-year anniversary from #MeToo going viral on social media, and “Saturday Night Live” checked in on the movement through its recurring “Film Panel” sketch, this time featuring guest host Awkwafina as Sandra Oh and of course Kate McKinnon as the “legend” Debette Goldry.

When Aidy Bryant, who played the moderator of the panel, asked what still had to change in Hollywood, answers ranged from the serious to the expectedly absurd.

Goldry took accusations a step farther when describing the parties “at a house in Palm Springs [where] some girl takes a nap in the pool.”

“Then they’re all, ‘Please, baby, just touch the knife, I’ll but you a sweater, be a pal.'”

When Awkwafina’s Oh said she had never experienced anything like that, McKinnon’s Goldry took it as a sign of progress.

Awkwafina as Oh also commented on how the conversation around #MeToo
See full article at Variety »

Docs of the Dead: The Danger of the ‘Late, Great Artist’ Documentary

Docs of the Dead: The Danger of the ‘Late, Great Artist’ Documentary
“Hey, did you see that new documentary? The one about that great performer who died really young? And the other one about the musician/actor/comedian who was tragically taken too soon from us? Yeah, it was really sad — you think these talented people have these amazing lives, but I guess some artists are just really tormented by their demons.”

If you overheard someone saying the above, what movies would you guess they were talking about? Would they be 2015’s one-two punch of Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck, about
See full article at Rolling Stone »

In his new memoir, even David Lynch doesn’t try to get inside David Lynch’s head

  • The AV Club
“It’s impossible to really tell the story of somebody’s life, and the most we can hope to convey here is a very abstract ‘Rosebud,’” David Lynch writes near the very end of Room To Dream, marveling at the failure of the preceding 500 pages to truly capture him. This is the inevitable upshot of all biographies, of…

Read more...
See full article at The AV Club »

Film Review: ‘Lou Andreas-Salomé, The Audacity to Be Free’

  • Variety
A boldly unconventional woman gets a crushingly conventional biopic with “Lou Andreas-Salomé, The Audacity to Be Free.” Such a heavy-handed title fits the film perfectly, far more than the original English-language handle, “In Love With Lou,” which confusingly made the movie sound like a sitcom. In her feature debut, director and co-writer Cordula Kablitz-Post clearly decided that Andreas-Salomé, famed author, philosopher and psychoanalyst, needed to be treated not just with kid gloves, but with pristine laminated mitts, robbing her subject of humor, let alone the charm that bewitched the likes of Friedrich Nietzsche, Rainer Maria Rilke and Sigmund Freud. This one’s strictly for audiences who love historical name-dropping; German box office following its June 2016 opening was negligible.

Kablitz-Post set herself the admirable task of rescuing Andreas-Salomé from being relegated to the role of muse, recognizing that her name is more often featured as an adjunct to famous men rather
See full article at Variety »

4 Great Films To Watch (As We Mark One Year of President Trump)

Graeme Robertson with four great films to watch as we mark one year of President Donald Trump…

January 20th, 2017 will be a date that will continue to baffle us for many years to come. It’s a date in which many of our preconceived notions of what is possible where thrown out the window and we emerged bewildered into a peculiar new age.

January 20th, 2017 was the date that saw Donald J. Trump, a man who had long been dismissed by the pundits as a joke of a political candidate sworn in as the 45th President of the United States.

However, we’re not here to wax philosophical about the facts that led to Trump taking the White House against the odds, we’re here to talk about films.

So to celebrate one year since The Donald’s unlikely ascension to the highest office of the world’s most powerful nation,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Isabelle Huppert delivers Tiff masterclass

Isabelle Huppert delivers Tiff masterclass
Talking with Tiff CEO Piers Handling, Huppert discussed her career, which includes over 100 film credits.

Isabelle Huppert is in focus at the 2016 Toronto Film Festival (Tiff), with the French actress starring in three films in this year’s programme: Elle, Souvenir and Things To Come.

Speaking to festival director and CEO Piers Handling in a masterclass on Saturday (Sept 10), Huppert – whose resume includes over 100 films, television and theatre productions, peppered with a bevy of awards recognition including 15 Cesar nominations – spoke candidly about the highs and lows of her career.

Michael Haneke, Michael Cimino, Claude Chabrol and Claire Denis were among the list of directors she gave credit for helping her to grow as an actress. French New Wave director Chabrol, she said, gave her little direction, in turn granting her almost complete artistic license.

“Working with a director is like building a strong friendship. There is desire, there is love – and for me, reality and truthfulness
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Michael Haneke’s Calais-set 'Happy End' secures deals as shoot begins

Exclusive: Les Films du Losange secures key deals; Matthieu Kassovitz joins cast also featuring Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert.

Paris-based Les Films du Losange has unveiled pre-sales on Michael Haneke’s next film Happy End as the first day of shooting begins in the northern French region of the Nord-Pas-de-Calais today.

Few details on the production have been revealed publicly bar that the film will revolve around a well-off French family living in a bourgeois bubble in northern France, oblivious to the human misery unfolding in migrant camps around the port town of Calais, a few miles from their home.

As previously reported by one French media outlet, Matthieu Kassovitz has recently joined the cast which also features the previously announced Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert as well as a host of younger new faces.

A number of distributors who released Haneke’s 2013 Palme d’Or and Oscar-winning Amour – which made $34m at global box office — have
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Michael Haneke’s Calais-set 'Happy End' secures key deals as shoot begins

Exclusive: Les Films du Losange secures deals; Matthieu Kassovitz joins cast also featuring Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert.

Paris-based Les Films du Losange has unveiled pre-sales on Michael Haneke’s next film Happy End as the first day of shooting begins in the northern French region of the Nord-Pas-de-Calais today.

Few details on the production have been revealed publicly bar that the film will revolve around a well-off French family living in a bourgeois bubble in northern France, oblivious to the human misery unfolding in migrant camps around the port town of Calais, a few miles from their home.

As previously reported by one French media outlet, Matthieu Kassovitz has recently joined the cast which also features the previously announced Jean-Louis Trintignant and Isabelle Huppert as well as a host of younger new faces.

A number of distributors who released Haneke’s 2013 Palme d’Or and Oscar-winning Amour – which made $34m at global box office — have signed
See full article at ScreenDaily »

A Destitute Waif

  • MUBI
Visage...

Voice...

Vitaphone...

In Dimitri Kirsanoff's Menilmontant a destitute waif, betrayed and abandoned by the man who seduced her, sits on a park bench with her newborn infant. Beside her is an old man eating a sandwich. This wordless exchange is one of the greatest moments ever committed to film. Nadia Sibirskaia’s face reveals all of life’s cruel mysteries as she gazes upon a crust of bread.

The persistence of hope is the dark angel that underlies despair, and here it taunts her mercilessly. A whole series of fluctuations of expression and movement in reaction to anguish, physical pain involving hesitation, dignity, ravenous hunger, survival, self-contempt, modesty, boundless gratitude. All articulated with absolute clarity without hitting notes (without touching the keys). Chaplin could have played either the old man on the bench (his mustache is a sensory device!) or Nadia. And it would have been masterful and deeply affecting,
See full article at MUBI »

The 15 Best Death Scenes in Movies

The new horror anthology "The ABCs of Death" wants to give gorehounds what they want in alphabetical order by representing each of their 26 segments with a letter. That's fine with us, since we always have plenty of death scenes organized with the Dewey Decimal System, and here are 15 of the most memorable, bloody, and enjoyable ones in the bunch.

Oh yeah, um, spoilers.

Taketoki Washizu in 'Throne of Blood' (1957)

'A' is for 'Arrows'

In one of Akira Kurosawa's many samurai epics with star/badass supreme Toshiro Mifune, the two of them created the kind of arrow-related death that "Lord of the Rings" elf Legolas must dream about at night. By the time this Macbeth stand-in is done for he's got more wood in him than Jenna Jameson and resembles a stoned porcupine. Sayonara, sucker!

High Treason

Throne of Blood at Movieclips.com Jaws in 'Jaws'
See full article at NextMovie »

Chaplin: The Musical

Hey everybody. Michael C here fresh from seeing one of the legends of the cinema sing and dance his way through his life story.

At one point during Chaplin, The Musical which opens tonight on Broadway, a troop of Little Tramps march on stage to perform a chorus line version of the classic dinner roll dance from Chaplin’s The Gold Rush. It was at this point that I began to suspect that the show had not quite licked the problem of how to adapt the life and times of the silent film genius to the Great White Way.

Trying to cram anybody’s life into a coherent story structure is always going to be a daunting task. Chaplin, The Musical attempts to compensate for the familiarity of their approach with heaping helpings of Broadway razzle-dazzle. And while there is an undeniable thrill to watching performers executing in real time
See full article at FilmExperience »

Florence Henderson: Former NYC Mayor Gave Me Crabs

New York City saw the continuation of a steep decline under the mayorship of John Lindsay, who reigned over the city from 1966-1973. Teachers went on strike, riots were fought and mounds of garbage filled the city streets.

Turns out he had some sanitation problems in his personal life, too.

Florence Henderson, most famous for her run as Carol Brady on the campy TV classic, "The Brady Bunch," reveals in her new memoir that she had a one-night stand with the Mayor while they were both in Beverly Hills. Henderson was married to Ira Bernstein at the time.

"I was lonely. I knew it wasn't the right thing to do. So, what did I do? I did it," she writes in "Life Is Not A Stage," the NY Daily News reports. And, following a night's sleep at home, she found out the hard way about the City that Never Sleeps.
See full article at Huffington Post »

The Postman Always Rings Twice: Letters To Cinema Retro

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro reader Harvey Chartrand has a bone to pick with Cinema Retro's Dean Brierly regarding his cover story in our latest issue:

Dean Brierly has an obvious hate-on for Candy which is unwarranted. His critique is unbalanced and excessively negative. I do not consider Candy an “all-star fiasco” or one of the worst movies ever made. Far from it. If you want to see a bad movie, check out Otto Preminger’s Middle East “thriller” Rosebud with Peter O’Toole (who looks like a dying man in this picture). Sure, Candy isn’t as good as the book, but so what? Neither was Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, now acknowledged to be superior to the more faithful Stephen King-scripted TV-movie adaptation with Steven Weber and Rebecca De Mornay.

I do recall enjoying Candy as a cultural artifact of its era (and I saw it quite recently). It’s emblematic of the swinging sixties.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

[DVD Review] Chaplin

No sub-genre is so rife with mediocrity as the celebrity bio-pic. The plot structure is absurd: portray a star from their birth to their death while hitting every famous moment they’ve ever had, their childhood, their love life, and their art/sport/money making, oh, and do it all in 2 hours. Every life, reduced to 2 hours, looks the same. It’s not that you can’t make an interesting film about a popular figure (although I’ve never seen a great one), but you have to either pick a single defining moment in his life (Capote, Good Night and Good Luck), or just get weird with it (I’m Not There, Last Days). But honestly, Ray, Walk the Line, Amelia, Ali, Finding Neverland, or La Vie En Rose? They’re all the same movie.

And don’t try and tell me about the lead actor’s great performance. That
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Iconic Class

Christian McKay has been teased about his uncanny resemblance to Orson Welles, a comparison he did not like. He wanted to be compared to Richard Burton. Still, when he found himself relegated to playing eunuchs in Shakespearean productions—"and that's several rungs lower than spear carriers," he says—followed by 18 months of unemployment, he reappraised the idea of Welles as a kind of alter ego. McKay performed the one-man show "Rosebud: The Lives of Orson Welles," by his pal Mark Jenkins, at the Edinburgh Festival and in London, Toronto, and New York. In Gotham, the actor was seen by Richard Linklater, who cast him as Welles in his film "Me and Orson Welles." McKay admits it's a meteoric career leap. Nevertheless, he acknowledges there's something to be said for being an unknown. "Audiences aren't going to say, 'There's so-and-so trying to be so-and-so,' " says the 36-year-old Lancashire, England,
See full article at Backstage »

Ninjas, Princesses and Old Dogs

  • IFC
Ninjas, Princesses and Old Dogs
Families arriving at the multiplex for a little pre/post-turkey entertainment have two choices -- separate off into your respective age/gender demographics and indulge yourselves, or stick together in a tragic statement of family unity and purchase seven tickets for "Old Dogs." The choice, it is yours.

Download this in audio form (MP3: 10:52 minutes, 10 Mb)

Subscribe to the In Theaters podcast: [Xml] [iTunes]

"Home"

A selection at Cannes 2008 and this year's Swiss Oscar hopeful, the sophomore feature from Ursula Meier centers on a middle class couple (Isabelle Huppert, Olivier Gourmet) that enjoys bringing up their children away from urban life in the French countryside. However, the construction of a highway near their home leads to a divide between the two on what's best for their family as the pollution from the cars and the incessant noise begins to drive them a little mad.

Opens in New York; opens in Los Angeles on December 18th.
See full article at IFC »

Top Ten Movies About U.S. Politics

Life is political. Hollywood is political. And yesterday in the U.S., the state elections were very political in the broad sense of the term, since many pundits kept arguing that they served as a referendum on President Obama and his policies.

We make no such claims. We're not here to talk U.S. politics specifically, but with all this political fever in play, what better time than to reflect back on what we believe are the ten best movies about American politics?

There are some terrific contenders here; not surprisingly some from decades gone by. But in most, the themes of power and corruption going hand-in-hand is front and center. It's material that's inherently rife with conflict, making for some of the best drama to be found anywhere.

So have a look at the following pages and our selections for the best movies about American politics. And when you're finished,
See full article at CinemaSpy »
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