5.3/10
1,463
41 user 18 critic

The Ghoul (1975)

R | | Horror, Thriller | 1 June 1975 (UK)
A former Priest named Dr. Lawrence harbors a dark and horrible secret in his attic. The locked room serves as a prison cell for his crazed, cannibalistic adult son, who acquired his savage ... See full summary »

Director:

Freddie Francis

Writer:

Anthony Hinds (screenplay) (as John Elder)
Reviews
1 win. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
Peter Cushing ... Doctor Lawrence
John Hurt ... Tom Rawlings
Alexandra Bastedo ... Angela
Gwen Watford ... Ayah
Veronica Carlson ... Daphne
Don Henderson ... The Ghoul
Ian McCulloch ... Geoffrey
Stewart Bevan Stewart Bevan ... Billy
John D. Collins ... Young Man
Dan Meaden Dan Meaden ... Police Sergeant
Edit

Storyline

A former Priest named Dr. Lawrence harbors a dark and horrible secret in his attic. The locked room serves as a prison cell for his crazed, cannibalistic adult son, who acquired his savage tastes in India during his father's missionary work there. Lawrence fears that his son will escape to prey upon the effete guests at his rural English estate during a cross-country auto race. Written by Ørnås

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Horror | Thriller

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Peter Cushing and Don Henderson played scenes together in Star Wars , A New Hope. See more »

Goofs

At c. 27 minutes we see Peter Cushing tuning his violin but he is not playing the open strings that we hear. Furthermore, later shots of his violin playing are extremely badly mimed. See more »

Quotes

Tom Rawlings: Well, it can't be Human, can it? It feeds on Human flesh!
See more »

Alternate Versions

The Ghoul was originally certified by the UK BBFC at 93m following cuts to (a) remove the third close-up of the knife embedded in Geoffrey's face (b) remove a knee to the groin delivered by Veronica Carlson to John Hurt. However, the subsequent theatrical version was only 87m following some last minute snipping by the distributors. The full 93m version, with BBFC cuts restored, was subsequently released on UK video on the Taste of Fear label. The differences are as follows:
  • the opening party sequence is extended by about 2m 30s via several additional dialogue extensions that largely serve to explain Carlson's character. In particular the conversation between her and Ian McCulloch when she is sitting in the car is nearly a minute longer and the subsequent three way conversation by another car involving Stewart Bevan is extended by about 40s.
  • About 35m into the film, directly after Peter Cushing asks Carlson whether there is anything she would like before dinner, the extended version has a new sequence lasting about 2m 30s in which Carlson is escorted upstairs to her bedroom and takes a bath (fans of the lady should note that her left breast is briefly visible). This sequence is missing entirely from the theatrical print.
  • After Bach's tocatta and fugue strikes up on the soundtrack the extended version has an extra 1m showing Carlson emerge from the bedroom, clothed again, and go down the stairs where she then peeks in on Cushing in his chapel. In the theatrical version it's a bit odd that Cushing is surprised by her given that in the previous scene they'd been together in his drawing room.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Best of the Worst: Our VHS Collection (2019) See more »

Soundtracks

Nocturne No. 2, Op. 9 in E-Flat Major
(uncredited)
Written by Frédéric Chopin
See more »

User Reviews

 
Creepy British horror flick with great central performance of Peter Cushing.
13 January 2009 | by HumanoidOfFleshSee all my reviews

England during the 1920s.At a party, two bored men challenge each other to a car race to Land's End.But one of the cars breaks down.Daphne Wells-Hunter walks to the nearby country estate to find help and meets Dr Lawrence,a former missionary to India,who lives in seclusion there. But then she is killed by the bald,cadaverous man that Lawrence keeps locked in an upstairs room and her companion is pushed over the cliff in the car.Their friends come looking for them and refuse to believe Lawrence's explanation that it was an accident.Interesting British production from Tyburn Films,founded by Kevin Francis.Not much is ever explained about cannibalistic ghoul hidden on the attic.The atmosphere of strangeness amid the mist-flowing moors is certainly well evoked and Peter Cushing gives a memorable performance as always.I have seen this film for the first time as a kid and it really creeped me out.8 out of 10.


5 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 41 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 June 1975 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Night of the Ghoul See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(DVD)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed