Galileo (1975) - News Poster

(1975)

News

Cosmic take on Brecht’s Galileo perfect for post-truth world

Director hails clash between science and political dogma as more relevant than ever

Watching stars at the theatre takes on new meaning at the Young Vic in London this month. A swirling cosmos and a giant planetarium have been recreated for an ambitious staging of Life Of Galileo, Bertolt Brecht’s masterpiece about the 17th-century astronomer.

The production marks a return to live performance by Joe Wright, one of the UK’s foremost film directors. Some of the audience will be on the floor, lying down or sitting on scattered cushions, from which they will gaze up at inspiring footage of stars, planets and cosmic clouds projected on to a vast circular structure suspended from the ceiling. Actors will perform among the audience and along a narrow circular platform, like a planetary ring system. The rest of the audience will be seated around them.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Fiddler On the Roof’ Actor Chaim Topol Awarded Israel Prize

‘Fiddler On the Roof’ Actor Chaim Topol Awarded Israel Prize
Tel Aviv – Israeli actor Chaim Topol, best known for his performance as Tevye the milkman in “Fiddler On the Roof,” has been awarded Israel’s highest honor: the Israel Prize for Lifetime Achievement.

Israel’s Education Ministry, which oversees the prize, announced the award on Monday.

Topol, 79, is among Israel’s most decorated actors. The winner of two Golden Globes, including one for his performance as Tevye, he has also been nominated for both an Academy Award and a Tony Award.

He broke onto the Israeli screen in 1964’s “Sallah Shabati,” a racially tinged comedy that was one of the first true Israeli hits, and which made history for being the first Israeli film to ever earn an Oscar nomination.

During his long career, Topol has also appeared on Broadway and West End stages, and in films in both Israel and Hollywood. He played the title role in Joseph Losey’s “Galileo,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Norman Lloyd at 100: THR's Todd McCarthy on a Legend's Staying Power

Norman Lloyd at 100: THR's Todd McCarthy on a Legend's Staying Power
He's been going to Broadway shows since he paid 50 cents for a balcony seat to see Al Jolson in Bombo in 1921. During the Great Depression he worked with Elia Kazan in the Theater of Action, then joined Orson Welles' Mercury Theater to act in the Boy Wonder's legendary Julius Caesar. He made his screen debut falling from the Statue of Liberty in Alfred Hitchcock's Saboteur, produced the world premiere of Bertholt Brecht's Galileo starring Charles Laughton at the Coronet Theater in Los Angeles, acted in films for Jean Renoir and Charlie Chaplin (and was the latter's tennis partner

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Photo Flash: First Look at Classic Stage Company's A Man's A Man

Classic Stage Company presents A Man's A Man, directed by Brian Kulick and featuring a new score and new songs by Tony Award-winning composer Duncan Sheik. This production continues Csc's exploration of the works of Bertolt Brecht, which began in 2011 with the sold-out production of Galileo and was followed by last season's The Caucasian Chalk Circle on which Kulick and Sheik also collaborated. The cast features Justin VivIan BondWidow Begbick are Jason Babinsky Polly Baker, Gibson Frazier Galy Gay, Martin Moran Uriah Shelley, Steven Skybell Jesse Mahoney, Stephen Spinella Bloody Five, Ching Valdes-Aran Mr. Wang and Allan K. Washington Ensemble. The official opening night is Thursday, January 30. A Man's A Man will play a limited engagement through February 16. BroadwayWorld brings you a first look at the cast in action below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Classic Stage Company's The Caucasian Chalk Circle, Starring Christopher Lloyd, Opens Tonight Off-Broadway

Classic Stage Company, under the leadership of Artistic Director Brian Kulick and Executive Director Greg Reiner, presents Bertolt Brecht's The Caucasian Chalk Circle featuring Christopher Lloyd Azdak, directed by Brian Kulick who directed Brecht's Galileo last season, and featuring new music by Tony Award-winning singersongwriter Duncan Sheik Spring Awakening. The show was recently extended for two additional weeks through Sunday, June 23. The official opening is tonight, May 30.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Classic Stage Company's The Caucasian Chalk Circle Extends Through 6/23; Lea DeLaria Joins Cast

Classic Stage Company, under the leadership of Artistic Director Brian Kulick and Executive Director Greg Reiner, announced today that their new production of Bertolt Brecht's The Caucasian Chalk Circle featuring Christopher Lloyd Azdak, directed by Brian Kulick who directed Brecht's Galileo last season, and featuring new music by Tony Award-winning singersongwriter Duncan Sheik Spring Awakening, will extend for two additional weeks through Sunday, June 23.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Photo Flash: First Look at Christopher Lloyd and More in Classic Stage's Caucasian Chalk Circle

Classic Stage Company, under the leadership of Artistic Director Brian Kulick and Executive Director Greg Reiner, presents a new production of Bertolt Brecht's The Caucasian Chalk Circle featuring Christopher Lloyd Azdak, directed by Brian Kulick who directed Brecht's Galileo last season, and featuring new music by Tony Award-winning singersongwriter Duncan Sheik Spring Awakening. The Caucasian Chalk Circle began performances on May 3 at Csc 136 East 13th Street for a limited engagement through Sunday, June 9. The official opening is Thursday, May 30. BroadwayWorld has a first look at the cast in action below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Elizabeth A. Davis, Mary Testa and More Star in Csc's The Caucasian Chalk Circle, Beg. Tonight

Classic Stage Company, under the leadership of Artistic Director Brian Kulick and Executive Director Greg Reiner, will present a new production of Bertolt Brecht's The Caucasian Chalk Circle featuring Christopher Lloyd Azdak, directed by Brian Kulick who directed Brecht's Galileo last season, and featuring new music by Tony Award-winning singersongwriter Duncan Sheik Spring Awakening. The Caucasian Chalk Circle will begin performances tonight, May 3 at Csc 136 East 13th Street for a limited engagement through Sunday, June 9. The official opening is Thursday, May 30.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Classic Stage Company's The Caucasian Chalk Circle Will Feature Elizabeth A. Davis, Mary Testa and More

Classic Stage Company, under the leadership of Artistic Director Brian Kulick and Executive Director Greg Reiner, will present a new production of Bertolt Brecht's The Caucasian Chalk Circle featuring Christopher Lloyd Azdak, directed by Brian Kulick who directed Brecht's Galileo last season, and featuring new music by Tony Award-winning singersongwriter Duncan Sheik Spring Awakening. The Caucasian Chalk Circle will begin performances Friday, May 3 at Csc 136 East 13th Street for a limited engagement through Sunday, June 9. The official opening is Thursday, May 30. Tickets are now on sale.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

David Hare on Richard Griffiths: Effortlessly breezy, impenetrably dark

One of the most winning aspects of the Almeida theatre, as run in the 1990s by a couple of actors, Jonathan Kent and Ian McDiarmid, was their determination to take up the cause of certain fellow players whom they knew to be undervalued. If Richard Griffiths was one of the most conspicuous beneficiaries of this policy, then, my goodness, he paid back their artistic largesse 50-fold.

He and I worked together first when Jonathan directed him as the controlling husband, Leone Gala, in my adaptation of Luigi Pirandello's The Rules of the Game in 1992. As we watched, awed by Richard's dazzling speed of thought and witty dexterity with language, the same notion occurred, probably simultaneously, to both Jonathan and me. Here was one of those rare actors who could convincingly play intellectuals, and who therefore might have a chance of following in Michael Gambon and Charles Laughton's huge footsteps in Brecht's Galileo.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

David Hare on Richard Griffiths: Effortlessly breezy, impenetrably dark

One of the most winning aspects of the Almeida theatre, as run in the 1990s by a couple of actors, Jonathan Kent and Ian McDiarmid, was their determination to take up the cause of certain fellow players whom they knew to be undervalued. If Richard Griffiths was one of the most conspicuous beneficiaries of this policy, then, my goodness, he paid back their artistic largesse 50-fold.

He and I worked together first when Jonathan directed him as the controlling husband, Leone Gala, in my adaptation of Luigi Pirandello's The Rules of the Game in 1992. As we watched, awed by Richard's dazzling speed of thought and witty dexterity with language, the same notion occurred, probably simultaneously, to both Jonathan and me. Here was one of those rare actors who could convincingly play intellectuals, and who therefore might have a chance of following in Michael Gambon and Charles Laughton's huge footsteps in Brecht's Galileo.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Farewell Richard Griffiths, virtuoso of both stage and screen

Much as we loved his Uncles Vernon and Monty, the actor shone brightest on stage, where he infused his roles with intelligence and wit

The BBC chose to announce the death of Richard Griffiths today by saying that the "Harry Potter actor" had died, but there was much more to Griffiths than his performance as the odious and self-satisfied Uncle Vernon Dursley in the Harry Potter movies, or even his gloriously memorable turn as the lascivious Uncle Monty in Bruce Robinson's cult movie, Withnail and I.

He was terrific in both, but first and foremost Griffiths was a great stage actor who will always be remembered for his Olivier award-winning performance as the deeply flawed Hector in Alan Bennett's The History Boys. His physical bulk (he ballooned in adolescence – apparently the result of a thyroid problem) ruled him out of being cast as a Romeo or Hamlet, but
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Christopher Lloyd to Lead Classic Stage Company's Caucasian Chalk Circle; Previews Begin 5/2

Classic Stage Company, under the leadership of Artistic Director Brian Kulick and Executive Director Greg Reiner, announced today that acclaimed film and television actor Christopher Lloyd, will star as Azdak in the company's upcoming spring production of Bertolt Brecht's The Caucasian Chalk Circle, to be directed by Brian Kulick who directed Brecht's Galileo last season, and featuring new music by Tony Award-winning singersongwriter Duncan Sheik, featuring translation by James and Tania Stern with lyrics by W.H. Auden. The Caucasian Chalk Circle will begin performances Thursday, May 2 at Csc 136 East 13th Street for a limited engagement. Tickets will go on sale to the general public on Tuesday, April 2.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Winter arts calendar 2012-2013

The Observer's critics pick the season's highlights, from the Misanthrope to Johnny Marr, Lulu to Lichtenstein, H7steria to Hitchcock. What are you most looking forward to? Add your comments below and download a pdf of the calendar here

December | January | FebruaryDecember

1 Film The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (3D)

Well, not so very unexpected. Every move has been tracked by fanboys, from the casting of Martin Freeman as Bilbo and Benedict Cumberbatch as the dragon Smaug to the return of the king, Peter Jackson, to take over directing from Guillermo del Toro. But Middle-earth (or, as it's sometimes known, New Zealand) is back for the next three Christmases.

3 Pop Scott Walker

The avant-garde Walker Brother returns with his first album since 2006's The Drift. Not for the faint-hearted, Bish Bosch finds the former romantic hero deep in dystopian territory, at once sonorous and rigorous.

3 Classical H7steria

World premiere of
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Galileo reaches for the stars

Topol, Tom Conti, Edward Fox and John Gielgud add up to one clever biopic, if you subtract 45 minutes of flagging in the middle

Galileo (1974)

Director: Joseph Losey

Entertainment grade: C+

History grade: A–

Galileo Galilei was an Italian astronomer and mathematician, and one of the most important historical figures in the development of modern physics.

Casting

It's 1609, and a skint, grumpy Galileo teaches mathematics in Padua. He is played by Topol. Yes, Topol, from Fiddler on the Roof. Critics were sniffy at the time, complaining that he didn't bring intelligence to the role – unlike, they said, the mostly British supporting cast, which includes Tom Conti and Edward Fox. In fact, Topol isn't that bad. He emphasises Galileo's earthiness instead of restrained scientific dignity, but that's a reasonable interpretation. The real Galileo is said to have played theatrically to audiences in Pisa, climbing the famous tower and throwing objects of
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Avengers Assemble – review

"Unhappy the land that has no heroes!" someone remarks to Bertolt Brecht's Galileo. "No. Unhappy the land that needs heroes," Galileo replies. And if superheroes are multiples of the ordinary variety, the world as perceived by Hollywood is currently in as dire straits as it was during the great depression when the comic-strip masked avengers were first created. Joss Whedon, a major hero to Tinseltown's accountants, and Marvel Comics' movie division have come up with the wheeze of bringing together six of Marvel's superheroes (Iron Man, the Hulk, Thor, Captain America and the lesser-known Hawkeye and Black Widow) to confront Loki (Tom Hiddleston), the evil trickster of Norse folklore. He's slipped through a crack in the universe and stolen the all-powerful Cosmic Cube. In the course of defeating his megalomaniac schemes, much of midtown Manhattan is destroyed along with several thousand people, though happily the Chrysler building survives.

The
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Movie Theaters I've Known and Loved

As a little girl I loved going to the Studio Drive In in Culver City where we lived.

My older sister and I would get into our pajamas, my little baby brother would be in the car seat for babies in the front seat between the driver and the passenger. We brought out own fried chicken ot eat for dinner. We'd go get popcorn or bonbons or a Holloway sucker (the best!) at the concessions stand ahead of the movies or at the intermission if we were still awake and we'd watch a double bill – usually a western and or a comedy.

When we got older and at the age of 16, we all got cars of our own. Mine was a 53 Ford convertible repainted royal blue. Groups of us would go to the Olympic Drive In and would sneak others in in the trunk.

When I was really little my father and mother would take my sister and me to the movies. I was always making my father take me to the bathroom. That started my habit of sitting on the aisle. As a film buyer it was known as the acquisitions seat, but to my mind, the quick getaway was to the Ladies Room. And as a three or four year old, I was always asking my mother and sister, "is this real?" I was so literal minded as a child I could never figure out why the song said “Let Freedom Ring”. How could Freedom Ring? A ring was jewelry. Ring like a bell…but Freedom is not a bell. Moving on…

We saw this Bob Hope film. He was a gambler. And he put a gun into his mouth. Instead of shooting his brains out, he took a bite and it was chocolate. That really threw my literal mind into a loop. What was real? How did that happen? The movie was called Sorrowful Jones. The joke was something I had a hard time understanding. The same with the silents which we saw at the Silent Movie Theater. Laurel and Hardy were always hitting each other and falling; Charlie Chase was always in trouble as was Charlie Chaplin. I never understood what was funny about all the accidents, falling down, hitting each other and would have terrible anxiety attacks at the silent movies. I liked movies like Francis the Talking Mule. That was funny to my childish mind.

For those wonderful Disney cartoons like Cinderella or Alice in Wonderland, Robin Hood or Peter Pan, my father would take us to Beverly Hills and we would stand in line for the Fine Arts Theater. At the corner was a shoe store which only sold sample sizes (4 ½). I would admire their high heeled shoes and couldn’t wait for the time that I would be older and could wear them. Fortunately, when my foot hit the 4 ½ size, I was in high school and so I could buy the shoes for all the formal dances we attended.

Fine Arts Theater

Every Saturday my sister and I, and later my brother would go to the ten-cent Saturday afternoon matinee at the Meralta with a newsreel, previews, cartoon, and a main feature. The Meralta introduced me to The Dream of Wild Horses.[1]"Meralta" was derived from owners' Pearl Merrill and Laura Peralta's surnames. They lived above the new plush theater. But the movies there were mostly horror and genre. My brother always went there for the latest horror film.

Meralta Theater, Culver City

If we didn’t go to the Meralta, we’d go to the Culver. When we were looking to meet other kids from other schools, we'd go to the much fancier Culver Theater.

The Culver had great films, like Little Women, Gone with the Wind, Gentlemen Prefer Blonds, How to Marry a Millionaire, River of No Return, There’s No Business Like Show Business, Easter Parade, A Date with Judy (My sister’s name!), The Three Musketeers, Words and Music, Force of Evil, Neptune’s Daughter, Adam’s Rib, Showboat, An American in Paris, Lili, Giant, Rebel Without a Cause. Looking at this list, except for the Marilyn Monroe movies which 20th Century Fox owned and the two James Dean films which Warner Bros. owned, all of the films were MGM films. That makes perfect sense because Culver City was a company town.

The Culver also had “loges”. These were fancier red velvet seats with ashtrays above the large aisle you would find on entering the theater and choosing your seat – below unless you went up to the loge. There teenagers would "make out" and bad girls and guys would smoke (Excuse my racism, but as a Jew growing up in a working class wasp neighborhood, I learned these kids were either Pachucos or white trash.) Not that we were such good Jewish kids...there weren’t any Jewish kids that I knew of who went to the movies. My friends were my school friends, and they were all white working class kids. If people weren’t working for Hughes Aircraft, they were in the crafts at MGM. We had one bit actor living down the street named Cameron Mitchell. And it was a pretty racist neighborhood…anti-Semitism was learned at home and in Sunday Schools where kids invited me (called a Christ Killer) to learn about bringing Jesus into my heart and there were no blacks that I ever saw. The Pachucos lived in another neighborhood and we’d see them in the movies, shopping or at the middle and high school next to my elementary school. Asians? There might have been a Chinese restaurant, but I don’t recall seeing Asians in school or at the theater or shopping.

Jewish kids made up my group of friends when I got to junior high and we had moved to Beverlywood from Culver City; 90% of the school was Jewish. Our parents would still drop us at the movies and we would go to Saturday matinees at the Picfair on Pico and Fairfax which eventually burned down around the time of the Watts Riots, or to the Lido on Pico.

The Picfair Theater burned down in 1965.

We’d see Academy Award winning films at the Pickfair. We'd cry at Carousel, Oklahoma, Midnight Lace, Peyton Place, Imitation of Life. Great films! Or we'd sometimes go to the other theater in Pico called Lido. It was just so boring. Maybe they showed Marty there or Country Girl and I wasn't up for slow drama.

For really fancy movies which held premieres, like Around the World in 80 Days, we would go to the Carthay Circle Theater. Of course I’d go in the days after the premiere itself. Rarely – though sometimes we’d go to the Hollywood palaces, Grauman’s Chinese, The Egyptian or Pantages Theaters on Hollywood Boulevard. The best thing about Grauman’s Chinese was the ladies room with a room filled with mirrors and little alcoves to sit and put on lipstick. They even had lipstick blotters, white heavy weight paper shaped like your lips to blot the lipstick.

In 1959 The Fine Arts Theatre 8556 Wilshire Boulevardin Beverly Hills showed Room at the Top, (‘The Most Daring Film in a Decade’), and it played there for over six months. I was in the 10th grade and went to see it. I liked it but am not sure how much I understood.

In high school we discovered Le Chein Andalou and the Coronet and Baronet theater where Charles Laughton had played in Brecht's premiere play Galileo produced by John Houseman. Sometimes they didn't have enough foreign films (like one about a woman who turned into a panther at night) and they'd show psychological teaching films like "Folie a Deux" when madness is shared by two, in this 20 minute short it was a mother and daughter. They'd show films on Schizophrenia, etc. and it made me want to study psychology. We saw all of Bergman, Renoir and saw La Strada and La Dolce Vida. When I moved back east and went to Brandeis then movie going got great! Truffaut, Godard, Chabrol, Wajda's Ashes and Diamonds. After that I saw every Wajda film and even knew how to pronounce his name. But after Man of Marble or Man of Steel I started to get disinterested. I have no idea what theaters we went to in Cambridge or New York except for the Bleecker Street Theater where we’d often go for the weekend.

For dates we’d go up the street (Beverwil) to Beverly Hills to the Beverly Theater or the Beverly Canon. There they had programs printed for the movies (The Young Lions). Afterward we’d go to Blum’s[2] for their crunchy cake or Wil Wrights Ice Cream Parlor for ice cream sundaes.

And a theater we would always forget except when some exceptional foreign film was showing there, was the Vagabond, way down on Wilshire Blvd. toward downtown.

[1]Wikipedia: The 1953 children's film Crin-Blanc, English title White Mane, portrayed the horses and the region. A short black-and-white film directed by Albert Lamorisse, director of Le ballon rouge (1956), Crin-blanc won the 1953 Prix Jean Vigo and the short film Grand Prix at the 1953 Cannes Film Festival, as well as awards at Warsaw and Rome.[10] In 1960 Denys Colomb Daunant, writer and actor for Crin-blanc, made the documentary Le Songe des Chevaux Sauvages, "Dream of the Wild Horses". It featured Camargue horses and slow motion photography, and won the Small Golden Berlin Bear at the 1960 Berlin International Film Festival.[11]

[2]Blum's was a pink spun sugar fantasy come to life. It had a gift shop. It had shocking pink banquettes. It had surly waitresses. And it had cake. Not those plastic looking, multi colored and tasteless layered cakes offered in cafes around Union Square. No. They had Blum's Famous Coffee Crunch cake. (This legendary cake is so memorable that Nancy Silverton has included a recipe for it in her latest cookbook.)

Blum's was partly a restaurant for the ladies who didn't work and spent their days going downtown to shop, meet friends and get home before the children came home from school. (http://www.culinarymuse.com/2005/10/blums_where_are.html)
See full article at SydneysBuzz »

This Week on Stage: Woody Allen's musical and Rufus Wainwright's opera

This Week on Stage: Woody Allen's musical and Rufus Wainwright's opera
Very few Broadway news stories excited me as much this week as Woody Allen’s announcement that he was turning one of his best films, Bullets Over Broadway, into a Main Stem musical. Yet, I did celebrate with the rest of Linda Lavin’s fans when the producers of The Lyons – in which she gave an award-worthy performance off-Broadway last fall — announced that the show was also coming to the Great White Way. Plus, as a huge devotee of the movie Once, I was thrilled for EW to get another sneak peak at the making of next month’s Broadway adaptation.
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

Front & No Longer Center

The great promises that come with a Classic Stage Company production of Bertolt Brecht's Galileo starring F. Murray Abraham are all fulfilled and exceeded. A phenomenal cast lead by a very capable director combines with an inspired production design and the irascible and biting words of Brecht to make a level of production which one often hopes for but so seldom gets. This is theater at its best.

F. Murray Abraham is truly a national treasure of the American theater. Making it all look so effortless, Abraham eases into the title role with relaxed deliveries, a quiet energy that burns with the intense inner fire of discovery, and subtle gestures that regularly strike upon incidental comic notes. His presence is commanding and his interaction with his fellow actors thoroughly human and natural. He is one of those few actors in possession of an Academy Award who is also undeniably a man to the stage born,
See full article at CultureCatch »

Captain America: The First Avenger 3D – review

"Unhappy the land that has no heroes," says someone in Brecht's Life of Galileo, to which Galileo replies: "No. Unhappy the land that needs heroes!" Make that superheroes and I'd say: "Hear, hear." Hollywood, working with Marvel Comics, is currently giving us a surfeit of these caped crusaders with camp costumes and special powers, the latest being the deadly dull Captain America, originally created as a comic book figure in 1941.

He's a 90lb weakling turned into a powerful democratic protagonist by a German emigre scientist (Stanley Tucci) as the Us enters the second world war. He has an opposite number in Hitler's Nazi superhero, Red Skull, a Teutonic villain with a strong physical resemblance to Harry Potter's nemesis, Voldemort. There are borrowings from the superior Raiders of the Lost Ark (for which Captain America's director won a visual effects Oscar) and it's altogether inferior to Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites