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Oscar Winner Michel Legrand Scores Orson Welles’ Final Film (Exclusive)

Oscar Winner Michel Legrand Scores Orson Welles’ Final Film (Exclusive)
French composer and multiple Oscar- and Grammy-winner Michel Legrand is scoring Orson Welles’ final film, “The Other Side of the Wind,” Variety has learned.

This will mark Legrand’s second Welles project. The veteran composer, whose work includes “Yentl,” “Summer of ’42,” “The Thomas Crown Affair” and “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg,” scored Welles’ last completed film, “F for Fake,” in 1974. Welles died in 1985.

Legrand, 86, has been secretly working on the film since December. Orchestral recording began on Monday in Belgium and will continue with a jazz ensemble later this week in Paris.

The composer calls it “one of the most exciting and delicate scores” he has written in his 60 years of working in movies. “I asked myself constantly, ‘How would Orson have reacted?’ The very subject of the film touched me: the idea of the passage of time, the renewal of inspiration. I am proud to be the link between these two Welles films.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A Letter To Rian Johnson

It feels a little bit like Christmas morning around the house this morning, even though we’ve still got a week and change to go before the actual day, and that’s undoubtedly because all the women here are rousing themselves a bit early to get ready for what amounts to Christmas 2017, Hollywood style. (The cats have been up for some time already, and they too are very excited, but you know, that’s just their way.) You see, in a couple hours we’re all piling into the car and making the pilgrimage up the hill to Universal City to see Star Wars: The Last Jedi. When it comes to buying advance tickets for a big movie for the whole family to see together my dear wife knows no restraints, and if the movie is prefixed with the words “Star Wars,” then all bets are most assuredly off.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

David Fincher Movies Ranked from Worst to Best

David Fincher Movies Ranked from Worst to Best
“There’s a difference between being obsessed and being motivated,” Mark Zuckerberg blithely insists during the opening moments of “The Social Network.” But the thing about the characters in a David Fincher movie is that they never seem to know what that difference is. In fact, the same might be true of David Fincher himself. And thank God for that, because if the Denver native had any idea where to draw the line between determination and dementedness he probably would have left Hollywood after being fired off his first Hollywood feature. Three times.

Ever since he transitioned from visionary music video director to features, Fincher has established himself as one of the most idiosyncratic and indispensable voices of mainstream American cinema. Often described as “the next Kubrick” (even while Kubrick was still alive), Fincher is an unyielding perfectionist working within a deeply imperfect system. From “The Game” and “Fight Club
See full article at Indiewire »

The Best Classic Movies for People Who Don’t Watch Older Films — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Classic Movies for People Who Don’t Watch Older Films — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

A recent article (based on a very unscientific poll) argued that millennials don’t really care about old movies. Maybe that’s true, and maybe it isn’t, but the fact remains that many people disregard classic cinema on principle. These people are missing out, but it only takes one film — the right film — to change their minds and forever alter their viewing habits.

This week’s question: What is one classic film you would recommend to someone who doesn’t watch them?

Candice Frederick (@ReelTalker), Hello Beautiful, /Film, Thrillist, etc

Rebel Without a Cause.” I’ll out myself by saying that I’ve only recently seen this film
See full article at Indiewire »

From Paris to Netflix: The Long, Strange Journey of Orson Welles’ Last Movie, ‘The Other Side of the Wind’

From Paris to Netflix: The Long, Strange Journey of Orson Welles’ Last Movie, ‘The Other Side of the Wind’
When Netflix announced March 14 it would be financing and distributing a finished cut of Orson Welles’ “The Other Side of the Wind,” the company opened a new chapter in one of the wildest, most frustrating sagas of film lore.

The legendary director shot his final film between 1970 and 1976, but a series of financial setbacks kept him from realizing his vision before his death in 1985. In the 32 years since, surviving members of the production had attempted to complete the project, but for legal reasons were unable to procure the more than 1,000 reels of negatives from a vault in Paris until the streaming giant stepped in this week.

The negatives are now safely in Los Angeles, in the hands of the team that will edit the film, according to a March 14 note from producer Filip Jan Rymsza. A short video released the next day on Yahoo details the process of shipping the reels.
See full article at Indiewire »

Which Documentaries Help Make Sense of the World Today? — IndieWire Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
Which Documentaries Help Make Sense of the World Today? — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: This past Friday saw the release of Raoul Peck’s “I Am Not Your Negro,” a documentary that speaks to our present moment through the writings and actions of the late James Baldwin. What other documentaries — recent or not — might help people better understand and / or respond to the state of the world today?

Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

“The state of the world today” is too big a matter for any one documentary, because there’s no one state of things, there’s an overwhelming diversity of experiences — and the history of movies is as much the history of the ones that it doesn’t show.
See full article at Indiewire »

Criterion Christmas Sale on Amazon

Christmas has come a little early to anyone hoping to score some Criterion Collection deals on Amazon today. While Amazon has been running a pretty good sale on a handful of discs throughout December, they’ve lowered the prices on lots of Blu-rays today, including a few pre-orders for next year.

Amazon doesn’t usually announce when an impromptu sale like this will end, so don’t hesitate. And don’t forget that you can lock in the pre-order price for some of the upcoming titles as well, but Amazon won’t charge you until they ship.

You can currently pre-order The Before Trilogy for $52.47 (48% off)

The following Blu-rays are currently (as of December 23rd at 10:30pm Pacific) down below $21 each.

The Asphalt Jungle Boyhood The Complete Lady Snowblood The Devil’s Backbone Diabolique Easy Rider The Executioner F for Fake The Game Harakiri Harold and Maude Hidden Fortress
See full article at CriterionCast »

‘Rules Don’t Apply’ Review: Warren Beatty’s Secretive Howard Hughes Biopic Defies Expectations

‘Rules Don’t Apply’ Review: Warren Beatty’s Secretive Howard Hughes Biopic Defies Expectations
Remove Warren Beatty from the equation and expectations of “Rules Don’t Apply” — which he wrote, directed and stars in — would fit the outcome. A sweet, old-fashioned Hollywood romance that just so happens to involve Howard Hughes as a supporting character, Beatty’s long-gestating project is a modestly enjoyable, well-acted nostalgia piece with just a touch of edge. As passion projects go, this one’s disarmingly slight in its ambitions, the opposite of Hughes’ legacy in every way.

At the same time, Beatty’s lively screenplay does a fine job of sketching out a distinct moment in Hughes’ legacy while situating more intimate drama within it. “Rules Don’t Apply” opens in 1964, on the brink of Hughes’ famous phone call to reporters on national television after years of avoiding them. From there, it flashes back six years to a very different occasion: Bright-eyed young actress Marla Collins (Lily Collins) heads
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: Operation Avalanche Director and Star Matt Johnson

Matt Johnson’s films could almost be described as half-truths or honest lies. They purposefully blur the line between fiction and non-fiction in such a fascinating way that you are never quite sure where the lie begins or ends. So it makes sense that my discussion with the young actor and director would include discussing the classic Orson Welles film F For Fake and why he enjoys injecting truths into stories… or maybe it’s the other way around.

After the controversial but film festival favorite The Dirties showcased the director roaming the halls of a real high school with his partner Owen Williams, Matt Johnson decided to use his unique storytelling style to venture to a new distant place and era. Operation Avalanche follows a group of CIA paper pushers as they attempt to orchestrate possibly the greatest hoax in human history: the 1969 moon landing. The group’s mission
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Operation Avalanche’ Director Matt Johnson Talks the Future of Fake Documentaries and the Perils of Big Budgets

One of the biggest conversation starters from this year’s Sundance Festival was Matt Johnson’s Operation Avalanche, a fake documentary that recounts four men’s attempts to stage the 1969 Moon landing. Playing on one of the biggest conspiracy theories of the past century, the film is as enamored with the possibility of toying with history as it is with the rigorous aestheticism needed to convincingly depict the time period of the 60s.

Employing the same narrative format as Johnson’s previous film, The Dirties, Johnson and his team, including writer and creative partner, Owen Williams, cast themselves in this reproduction of alternate history. The result is a fascinating comedy-thriller, that also serves as a meticulous love letter to both the technology of the time period and cinema’s ability to obscure our perception of time and space.

In time for its expanded limited release, we had an expansive conversation
See full article at The Film Stage »

Criterion Reflections – The Immortal Story (1968) – #831

David’s Quick Take for the tl;dr Media Consumer:

This subdued hour long late-career enigma from Orson Welles initially feels a bit sad and anti-climactic when it’s presented as his “final completed fictional feature” (as stated on the back of the new Criterion Collection release.) A quiet, languidly paced adaptation of an Isak Dinesen short story, there’s very little action to stimulate the senses much of the time, with most lines delivered by actors sitting down, standing still and speaking rather quietly. When the tension ramps up a bit toward the end, the self-conscious art house touches run a great risk of falling flat and coming across as unintentionally comical. But the excellent 4K restoration, a well-curated selection of supplemental features, and above all else, the compelling presentation of a great man and cultural innovator entering his artistic decline makes the new Blu-ray package of The Immortal Story
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Best of Movie Poster of the Day: Part 15

  • MUBI
Above: French grande for El Topo (Alejandro Jodorowsky, Mexico, 1970). Artist: “Moebius,” aka Jean Giraud, aka “Gir” (1938-2012).You might expect something wilder from the fecund paired imaginations of Alejandro Jodorowsky and the artist known as Moebius. But this striking yet unusually restrained poster for El Topo (courtesy of Film/Art Gallery who provided a second, that’s-more-like-it Italian poster for the film that also made the top 20) was the most popular poster on Movie Poster of the Day over the last three months by a long stretch of desert.Collecting the posters with the most likes and reblogs yields a particularly attractive and typically diverse collection of art. There are Danish posters for French films, Polish posters for Italian films, Italian posters for Russian films and Russian posters for American films. Plenty of great artists are represented: from the Sternberg Brothers to John Alvin, from Andrzej Onegin-Dabrowski to Georges Kerfyser,
See full article at MUBI »

The Best Films That Blur the Line Between Fact and Fiction

There is no other place where fact and fiction become more indistinguishable from one another than at the cinema. What you see isn’t always what you get: a manufactured image might feel genuine, while an image that feels inauthentic might be the real thing. The finest stories can often be found somewhere in the middle. As Pablo Picasso once said, “Art is not truth. Art is a lie that makes us realize truth.”

Kate Plays Christine, the latest film from Actress and Fake It So Real director Robert Greene, caught a great deal of attention at Sundance — we gave it the highest grade at the festival — and is now in limited release. It’s a documentary that follows actress Kate Lyn Sheil (House of Cards) as she prepares for the role of Christine Chubbuck, a real-life news reporter who committed suicide via handgun on live television in 1974, and the
See full article at The Film Stage »

Blu-ray Review: The Immortal Story Explores the Nature and Necessity of Storytelling

The Immortal Story, one of Orson Welles's final films as a director, is a fascinating look into not only the necessity of storytelling, but also his own obsessions with truth and illusion. From the very beginning of his career as a performing artist, Welles was pushing the edges of what was expected and acceptable in entertainment. From his mass hysteria inducing radio performance of Hg Wells' The War of the Worlds in 1938, to the dangerously subversive Citizen Kane in 1939, all the way through to his oblique treatise on the nature of truth in storytelling and magic F For Fake in 1974, Orson Welles was never satisfied simply telling a story, it needed to say something about the form in order to gain his...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

New York Comedy Festival Lineup Announcement: Tracy Morgan, Patton Oswalt & More to Headline

New York Comedy Festival Lineup Announcement: Tracy Morgan, Patton Oswalt & More to Headline
The New York Comedy Festival (Nycf), presented in association with Comedy Central, has announced its packed lineup of comedians who will make New York laugh when the festival runs from November 1 – 6. For six days, over 200 comedians will perform in more than 60 shows across all five boroughs at some of New York City’s most prestigious venues.

Headliners include Tracy Morgan, Marc Maron and Tig Notaro (who will all perform at Carnegie Hall), along with Dane Cook, Chris D’Elia, Trevor Noah, Patton Oswalt and Tim Minchin (all at the Beacon Theater), Bill Maher at The Theater at Madison Square Garden, Cameron Esposito at Nyu’s Skirball Center, Bridget Everett and T.J. Miller at Town Hall, and Eric André, who will take the stage at Carolines on Broadway for a four-night engagement.

Read More: ‘One Mississippi’ Trailer: Tig Notaro’s Tragic Comedy Dives Deep Into Processing Grief

“We’re thrilled to
See full article at Indiewire »

Patton Oswalt returns to action on 'Full Frontal with Samantha Bee'

  • Hitfix
Patton Oswalt returns to action on 'Full Frontal with Samantha Bee'
Patton Oswalt is dealing with a terrible tragedy: the sudden death of his wife, crime writer Michelle McNamara, in her sleep a few weeks ago. Other than writing a beautiful essay about her for Time, Oswalt has mostly retreated from public life to grieve and take care of their daughter. Last night, though, he popped up on TBS' Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, albeit in a segment that was filmed before McNamara's death. I love You guys and I was lucky to get to do this...holy shit...a month ago. Feels like a decade. https://t.co/h2bnzgAIDs — Patton Oswalt (@pattonoswalt) May 10, 2016 Here's the whole segment, which casts Oswalt as Orson Welles in a segment about abortion, by way of a parody of Welles' 1973 documentary F for Fake (which you can watch here to see how well Oswalt and the Full Frontal team nailed it):
See full article at Hitfix »

Celebrate April Fools’ Day with Orson Welles and ‘F for Fake’

April Fools’ Day is not especially well-liked, at least if you, too, don’t understand the appeal in whatever opportunity websites take to post idiotic, fake news items — “Zack Snyder Directing Star Wars Spinoff After Justice League” psych! gotcha! owned! — and reap a couple of clicks before everyone just moves on with their day. And trickery can be such fun! Notwithstanding the fact that just about every film ever made is the result of many illusions stacked on top of each other, those few that properly manipulate the boundaries between representation and understanding can work themselves to ends so sublime that they feel like an apotheosis of film art.

Rather than burdening readers with a link to some “story” about Hong Sang-soo becoming Marvel Studios’ new creative chief, we’ll use this day to celebrate Orson WellesF for Fake, a documentary-of-sorts in which the filmmaker walks us through stories of forgery,
See full article at The Film Stage »

True Icon of a False Prophet: Dennis Hopper as "The American Dreamer"

  • MUBI
L.M. Kit Carson and Lawrence Schiller's The American Dreamer (1971) is exclusively playing on Mubi through March 12, 2016.Photo by Lawrence SchillerWith a budget of $1 million, 1971's The Last Movie is the cheapest film ever to be considered a major folly. Tugging on his beard and watching a rough cut, Dennis Hopper prepares for his new project's inevitable critical disemboweling. He knows, after all, that among many delirious and noxious (though often brilliant) self-referential shenanigans it features a gigantic breast ejaculating milk onto Hopper's own receptive face. With self-aggrandizing irony (or is that ironic self-aggrandizement?), Hopper aspires to Orson Welles's career trajectory: "I can become Orson Welles, poor bastard." He declares his debut, 1969's Easy Rider, his Citizen Kane and The Last Movie his The Magnificent Ambersons. Nevertheless, the response to The Last Movie scared him away from directing for nearly a decade, rather than duplicating Welles's indomitable retreat to self-,
See full article at MUBI »

Disc Deals: 50% Off Criterion Blu-rays at Amazon

The Barnes & Noble sale may have ended a couple of weeks ago, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t still buy some Criterion Collection releases for 50% off. Best Buy is currently having a 50% off sale on a number of Criterion releases, and Amazon has begun to match their prices.

Thanks to everyone for supporting our site by buying through our affiliate links.

A note on Amazon deals, for those curious: sometimes third party sellers will suddenly appear as the main purchasing option on a product page, even though Amazon will sell it directly from themselves for the sale price that we have listed. If the sale price doesn’t show up, click on the “new” options, and look for Amazon’s listing.

I’ll keep this list updated throughout the week, as new deals are found, and others expire. If you find something that’s wrong, a broken link or price difference,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Joshua Reviews Maíra Bühler And Matias Mariani’s I Touched All Your Stuff [Theatrical Review]

Documentary cinema is in the middle of an evolutionary moment. Filmmakers are beginning to experiment not only with style, but with structure and story, making it both one of the most exciting moments in non-fiction cinema history and also one of the most boundary pushing. Be it the blend of fact with fiction or the sensory-focused aesthetic and story structure that seems to be the newest trend, documentary film is a world that has been routinely giving cinephiles some of the most exciting work.

And it’s no different with the first film from distribution label Cinema Slate, I Touched All Your Stuff.

From directors Maria Buhler and Matias Mariani comes this story of a man by the name of Chris Kirk, a former Michigander who turned drug smuggler in a story that you wouldn’t believe if he told it to you. Doing exactly that, however, the two directors
See full article at CriterionCast »
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