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‘The Deer Hunter’ Celebrates 40th Anniversary With New Trailer & Poster

To celebrate the film’s 40th Anniversary, Michael Cimino’s epic masterpiece The Deer Hunter has been stunningly restored with a brand new 4k restoration, releasing on Blu-ray, The Collector’s Edition and Est 20th August, and on 4K Ultra HD 15th October. For one day only, Park Circus will showcase the film in cinemas from 4th July – the release date coinciding with America’s Independence Day.

Winner of no less than five Academy Awards® in 1978 including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Supporting Actor for Christopher Walken, The Deer Hunter is widely acknowledged as one of cinema’s great masterpieces and contains some of the most memorable scenes in film history. With the film painting a sobering portrait of a small Pennsylvania steel town rocked by loss when three of its sons go off to fight in Vietnam, Cimino’s ambitious and daring vision is showcased in this bold and brilliant war classic – that,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Martin Bregman, Producer Of ‘Scarface’, ‘Carlito’s Way’, ‘Serpico Dies At 92

Martin Bregman, producer of some of Al Pacino’s biggest movies, has passed away at the age of 92. Deadline reports the news of the prolific producer’s passing, which was confirmed by Bregman’s son Michael over the weekend. The trade adds that he death was attributed to cerebral haemorrhage, his widow, Cornelia, told News 4’s Chuck Scarborough.

Martin Bregman produced some of Pacino’s biggest hits, including Scarface, Carlito’s Way, Serpico and Sea Of Love. He was also behind films like Dog Day Afternoon, The Four Seasons, Betsy’s Wedding, Carlito’s Way: Rise to Power, The Bone Collector and The Adventures of Pluto Nash.

Bregman was nominated for the Academy Award for the classic Dog Day Afternoon in 1976.

The producer was reportedly rushed to Weill Cornell Presbyterian Hospital in New York City early on Saturday morning. He passed away later that afternoon.He is survived by his widow Cornelia,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Martin Bregman, Producer of ‘Serpico’ and ‘Scarface,’ Dies at 92

  • The Wrap
Martin Bregman, Producer of ‘Serpico’ and ‘Scarface,’ Dies at 92
Martin Bregman, a talent manager and film producer whose credits include classic like “Scarface,” “Serpico,” and “Dog Day Afternoon”, died Saturday of a cerebral hemorrhage. He was 92. NBC 4 first reported the news.

Born in New York City in 1926, Bregman entered the entertainment industry first as a nightclub agent before moving into personal management. As a manager, his clients would eventually include at various times luminaries like Alan Alda, Woody Allen, and Barbra Streisand among others.

Bregman’s greatest impact on Hollywood was the result of his relationship with Al Pacino. Bregman discovered Pacino performing in an Off Broadway play in the 1960s, and became his manager. He helped Pacino land his first starring film role in the 1971 drama “The Panic in Needle Park.” It was that role which brought Pacino to the attention of Francis Ford Coppola, leading to Pacino’s breakthrough as Michael Corleone in “The Godfather.”

Also
See full article at The Wrap »

Martin Bregman, ‘Scarface’ Producer, Dies at 92

Martin Bregman, ‘Scarface’ Producer, Dies at 92
Martin Bregman, producer of Al Pacino films “Serpico,” “Dog Day Afternoon,” “Scarface” and “Sea of Love,” died Saturday. He was 92.

His wife Cornelia told NBC 4 he died of a cerebral hemorrhage.

As producer of “Dog Day Afternoon,” he shared a best picture nomination in 1976.

Bregman, who discovered Pacino in an Off Broadway play, was the personal and business manager not only for Pacino and Alan Alda but also at various times for Barbra Streisand, Woody Allen, Faye Dunaway, Candice Bergen and Bette Midler.

Bregman nurtured Pacino as the actor built his stage and then his film career, helping Pacino land his first starring role in a feature, 1971’s “Panic in Needle Park,” for which the actor beat out Robert De Niro.

Building film projects around the young Pacino, Bergman produced his first films in 1973’s “Serpico” and 1975’s “Dog Day Afternoon,” both memorably starring the actor. The two would later reteam for 1983’s “Scarface,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Martin Bregman Dies: Venerable New York Producer Was 92

Update: Michael Bregman, son of Martin Bregman, confirmed his father’s passing. Below is a rewrite, my attempt at a proper obit of a storied New York producer. Martin Bregman, the New York-based producer of such films as Sea of Love, Scarface, Dog Day Afternoon, Serpico and Carlito’s Way, died Saturday at age 92. His passing was first reported by local New York TV news station Wnbc. His passing was attributed to cerebral hemorrhage, his widow, Cornelia, told News 4’s…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Martin Bregman, Legendary Producer of 'Scarface' and 'Dog Day Afternoon,' Dies at 92

Martin Bregman, Legendary Producer of 'Scarface' and 'Dog Day Afternoon,' Dies at 92
Martin Bregman, the seasoned producer behind Scarface and Dog Day Afternoon, has died at 92, Wnbc 4 New York reported Saturday night. The producer died of a cerebral hemorrhage on Saturday evening, the outlet reported.

Bregman, who actor Al Pacino once described in a Hollywood Reporter interview as "my guy," also produced Carlito's Way, Serpico and Sea of Love with the actor, and was slated to produce David Ayer's upcoming adaptation of Scarface.

Pacino has often credited the producer with offering him crucial early career guidance. "I'm missing a lot not having him around anymore," Pacino said in a 2014 ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘American Animals’: Real-Life Heist Inspiration Spencer Reinhard on How His Life Was the Anti-‘Oceans 11’

‘American Animals’: Real-Life Heist Inspiration Spencer Reinhard on How His Life Was the Anti-‘Oceans 11’
With “Oceans 8” and “American Animals” now in theaters, heist movies are having a moment. It’s not hard to see why: During this chaotic chapter in the cultural history of the country, there’s nothing more fun than watching an elaborate cast of characters planning a near-impossible crime, one successfully pulled off with smooth moves, sleight of hand, and winks at the camera.

American Animals” has become a surprise summer hit at the specialty box office, grossing nearly half a million dollars in its first two weeks. But it’s a different kind of heist movie than anything in the “Ocean’s” franchise. The crime draws from a real-life incident — when four college-aged Kentucky men attempted to steal some rare books from Transylvania University in 2004 — and director Bart Layton flips the script on the audience, by bringing in the real people involved to tell their story alongside the actors midway through.
See full article at Indiewire »

'American Animals': Inside the Stranger-Than-Fiction Docu-Heist Thriller

'American Animals': Inside the Stranger-Than-Fiction Docu-Heist Thriller
When filmmaker Bart Layton first began to investigate the story of four young men who tried to steal $12 million worth of old books from the Transylvania University library, he intended to make a documentary. Then he started exchanging letters with the guys, who were – spoiler alert – sitting in prison, their crime having failed spectacularly. That's when his plan changed.

"The starting point has to be the story, and this was a story about a group of young men who are almost trying to inhabit a movie fantasy instead of their real lives,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

From Homeless to Netflix: The Long Journey of ‘Godless,’ Scott Frank’s Feminist Western

From Homeless to Netflix: The Long Journey of ‘Godless,’ Scott Frank’s Feminist Western
Godless” is the smart western that nobody wanted when it was a two-hour movie. Scott Frank (“A Walk Among the Tombstones”) spent 12 years hearing “no” to his drama about a small town that lost all of its men to a mining disaster. However, once it became a limited series, Netflix jumped at the opportunity.

Frank has long been known as a hot screenwriter, in a career that stretches from Kenneth Branagh’s “Dead Again” in 1991 to Oscar-nominated turns for Steven Soderbergh’s 1998 “Out of Sight” and last year’s “Logan.” However, he never expected to become the showrunner of a sprawling TV series.

“I could watch eight movies all day for the price of a ticket and candy,” said Frank. As a kid growing up in northern California in the 1960s, his mom would drop him off at the theater for marathon movie sessions. That’s where he discovered Sergio Leone
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

From Homeless to Netflix: The Long Journey of ‘Godless,’ Scott Frank’s Feminist Western

From Homeless to Netflix: The Long Journey of ‘Godless,’ Scott Frank’s Feminist Western
Godless” is the smart western that nobody wanted when it was a two-hour movie. Scott Frank (“A Walk Among the Tombstones”) spent 12 years hearing “no” to his drama about a small town that lost all of its men to a mining disaster. However, once it became a limited series, Netflix jumped at the opportunity.

Frank has long been known as a hot screenwriter, in a career that stretches from Kenneth Branagh’s “Dead Again” in 1991 to Oscar-nominated turns for Steven Soderbergh’s 1998 “Out of Sight” and last year’s “Logan.” However, he never expected to become the showrunner of a sprawling TV series.

“I could watch eight movies all day for the price of a ticket and candy,” said Frank. As a kid growing up in northern California in the 1960s, his mom would drop him off at the theater for marathon movie sessions. That’s where he discovered Sergio Leone
See full article at Indiewire »

Tribeca Film Review: Ethan Hawke in ‘Stockholm’

Tribeca Film Review: Ethan Hawke in ‘Stockholm’
Stockholm Syndrome is a phenomenon we’re all familiar with — at least, in the abstract. In a hostage situation, some ordinary folks will start to sympathize and identify with the people holding them hostage; it’s a survival technique that carries a weird undercurrent of transgression, as if they secretly wanted to be their captors. In the most legendary and spectacular case of Stockholm Syndrome — the Patty Hearst affair, in 1974 — the kidnap victim swung all the way over to the other side. Yet that was far from typical. Patty, the 20-year-old heiress who wedded herself to the “revolutionary” Symbionese Liberation Army, sporting a beret and a born-again moniker (Tania!) and a machine gun, was more like a case of Stockholm Syndrome to the fifth power.

Far more characteristic is the bank robbery and six-day hostage crisis that the syndrome was originally named for. It took place in 1973, and “Stockholm” offers a loose,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Scarface' Reunion: 10 Things We Learned at Tribeca Film Festival Event

The Tribeca Film Festival celebrated the 35th anniversary of Scarface on Thursday night with "the greatest double feature in the history of the Beacon [Theater in Manhattan]:" a screening of the movie followed by a panel featuring three of the actors – Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer and Steven Bauer – plus director Brian De Palma.

The crowd was raucous throughout the screening, hooting and hollering each time Pacino delivered one of his signature lines or snorted his way through yet another small mountain of cocaine. Viewers brought the same energy into a bizarre, sometimes
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Paterno’ reviews: Al Pacino ‘at his best’ in ‘remarkable’ performance as disgraced football coach Joe Paterno

‘Paterno’ reviews: Al Pacino ‘at his best’ in ‘remarkable’ performance as disgraced football coach Joe Paterno
Al Pacino is the king of HBO, winning Emmys for “You Don’t Know Jack” in 2010 and “Angels in America” in 2004. Both of these trophies came for playing real-life characters, so might his latest performance in “Paterno” as disgraced Penn State football coach Joe Paterno seal the deal for Emmy #3?

Television critics, as you’d expect, are raving about Pacino’s latest performance in the HBO telefilm. See some of their reviews below about the 1992 Oscar winner (“Scent of a Woman”), and then be sure to give us your Emmy predictions for Best Movie/Mini Actor.

SEEAl Pacino movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best, including ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Dog Day Afternoon,’ ‘Scent of a Woman

“Al Pacino is at his best,” praises Robert Lloyd (La Times). “Pacino’s performance is interesting in its smallest gestures and unusually interior and contained. And contained Pacino is the best Pacino, your love of ‘Scarface’ notwithstanding.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Emmys 2018: Al Pacino (‘Paterno’) is looking for trophy #3 thanks to latest HBO production

Emmys 2018: Al Pacino (‘Paterno’) is looking for trophy #3 thanks to latest HBO production
Al Pacino and HBO have proven themselves quite a strong pairing when it comes to the Emmys. “Paterno” recently aired on the network and received strong reviews for Pacino. Even prior to the film’s premiere Pacino was trending on Gold Derby’s prediction charts for Best Movie/Mini Actor. Should Pacino pull off a victory in this category it would mark the third time HBO and Pacino have teamed up for an Emmy win.

“Paterno” tells the story of famed Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, whose career ended in scandal when one of his assistant coaches was accused of sexually molesting young boys and Paterno was accused of covering up the crime. Critical reaction has been very strong about Pacino’s performance, with IndieWire calling him “remarkable” and the La Times referring to Pacino as being “at his best.”

SEEAl Pacino movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Al Pacino movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best, including ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Dog Day Afternoon,’ ‘Scent of a Woman’

Al Pacino movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best, including ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Dog Day Afternoon,’ ‘Scent of a Woman’
This year Al Pacino may pick up his third career Emmy Award as Best Movie/Mini Actor for the HBO telefilm “Paterno.” He plays the title role of disgraced Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, whose successful 45-year career ended after his assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was revealed to have been a child molester. Pacino previously won the same prize for “Angels in America” in 2004 and “You Don’t Know Jack” in 2010, and he was nominated once more for “Phil Spector” in 2013. But of course, most of Pacino’s career has been in film and not television. In honor of his latest small-screen achievement, let’s take a look back at some of his best big-screen performances. Tour through our photo gallery above of Pacino’s 25 greatest films above, ranked from worst to best.

Pacino is an Academy Award winner for his cinematic work, but it took him 20 years and
See full article at Gold Derby »

Al Pacino movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Al Pacino movies: 25 greatest films ranked from worst to best
This year Al Pacino may pick up his third career Emmy Award as Best Movie/Mini Actor for the HBO telefilm “Paterno.” He plays the title role of disgraced Penn State football coach Joe Paterno, whose successful 45-year career ended after his assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was revealed to have been a child molester. Pacino previously won the same prize for “Angels in America” in 2004 and “You Don’t Know Jack” in 2010, and he was nominated once more for “Phil Spector” in 2013. But of course, most of Pacino’s career has been in film and not television. In honor of his latest small-screen achievement, let’s take a look back at some of his best big-screen performances. Tour through our photo gallery above of Pacino’s 25 greatest films above, ranked from worst to best.

Pacino is an Academy Award winner for his cinematic work, but it took him 20 years and
See full article at Gold Derby »

Christopher Nolan and Jessica Chastain Interview Al Pacino About Happiness and Preferring Theater Over Film

Christopher Nolan and Jessica Chastain Interview Al Pacino About Happiness and Preferring Theater Over Film
In celebration of the Al Pacino retrospective at New York City’s Quad Cinema this month, Interview Magazine decided to ask some of the actor’s most notable collaborators to interview him about his legendary acting career. One interviewer is none other than Christopher Nolan, who directed Pacino opposite Robin Williams in the 2002 psychological thriller “Insomnia.”

“How do you achieve a balance between script-based discipline and emotional spontaneity?” Nolan asked Pacino right out of the gate.

“It depends on the script, but you need to rehearse,” Pacino said. “As a matter of fact, the strangest thing, the more you rehearse, the more spontaneous you become. It’s the opposite of what people think. Actors who aren’t used to rehearsal will say, ‘I want to be spontaneous when it comes.’ And that’s the way they make most movies now. There’s no rehearsal time. In rehearsal, you can do different things.
See full article at Indiewire »

Beetlejuice Musical Is Coming to Washington D.C. This Fall

Beetlejuice Musical Is Coming to Washington D.C. This Fall
Beetlejuice is making his way from the screen to the stage. Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures has announced that their Beetlejuice musical is heading to Washington D.C. this October for its initial run. The hope is that the play will eventually make its way to Broadway in New York, but the current roadmap for those plans has yet to be revealed. Much of that will probably have to do with how this run of shows in D.C. goes, but those of us who have been waiting around somewhat hopelessly for Beetlejuice 2 may have the next best thing to look forward to.

This Beetlejuice musical serves as an adaptation of Tim Burton's 1988 classic movie, which starred Michael Keaton in the titular role, alongside the likes of Winona Ryder, Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis. As far as we know, none of the cast members from the movie are involved in the stage production.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Warner Bros. is Developing a Beetlejuice Musical For Broadway

The classic 1988 Tim Burton film Beetlejuice is now being adapted into a Broadway musical by Warner Bros. Theater Ventures. I don't recall anyone asking for a Beetlejuice musical, but it's happening and it will make its world premiere at the National Theatre in Washington, D.C. in October.

I love the movie Beetlejuice, but I'm not sure what to think about it being turned into a musical. The music and lyrics come from Eddie Perfect, the Australian actor-writer-composer who’s also working on the musical version of King Kong. The musical is also being developed by Scott Brown and Anthony King (Broad City), director Alex Timbers (Rocky, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson) and choreography by Connor Gallagher (The Robber Bridegroom).

They also brought on the design team behind The Lion King to work on the puppets, sets, and costumes that will be used in the Beetlejuice musical. So, at least we
See full article at GeekTyrant »

‘Beetlejuice’ Musical Sets Pre-Broadway Plan

‘Beetlejuice’ Musical Sets Pre-Broadway Plan
Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures’ brewing musical adaptation of “Beetlejuice” has mapped out its road to Broadway, locking in a world premiere run at the National Theatre in Washington, D.C. in October.

An adaptation of the 1988 Warner Bros. comedy that starred Michael Keaton and Winona Ryder, “Beetlejuice” has music and lyrics by Eddie Perfect, the Australian actor-writer-composer who’s also at work on the musical version of “King Kong,” and book by Scott Brown and Anthony King (“Broad City”). Alex Timbers (“Rocky,” “Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson”) directs, with choreography by Connor Gallagher (“The Robber Bridegroom”).

Beetlejuice” centers on an obnoxious ghost (played by Keaton in the movie) and the misfit teen (played by Rider) who moves into a haunted country house with parents she can’t stand. The movie, with a story written by Michael McDowell and Larry Wilson, has become a fan favorite, and talk of a sequel recurs
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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