5.5/10
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42 user 27 critic

Doc Savage: The Man of Bronze (1975)

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1:27 | Trailer

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ON DISC
Doc and the Amazing Five battle Captain Seas and "the green death" for control of a fabulous resource.

Director:

Michael Anderson

Writers:

Lester Dent (based upon the novel by) (as Kenneth Robeson), George Pal (screenplay by) | 1 more credit »
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1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ron Ely ... Clark Savage Jr. aka Doc
Paul Gleason ... Long Tom
William Lucking ... Renny (as Bill Lucking)
Michael Miller Michael Miller ... Monk Mayfair
Eldon Quick ... Johnny
Darrell Zwerling ... Ham
Paul Wexler ... Captain Seas
Janice Heiden Janice Heiden ... Adriana
Robyn Hilton ... Karen
Pamela Hensley ... Mona
Bob Corso Bob Corso ... Don Rubio Gorro
Carlos Rivas ... Kulkan
Chuy Franco Chuy Franco ... Cheelok
Alberto Morin ... Jose
Victor Millan Victor Millan ... Chief Chaac
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Storyline

In the Fabulous Thirties, Doc Savage and his five Amazing Adventurers are sucked into the mystery of Doc's father disappearing in the wilds of South America. The maniacal Captain Seas tries to thwart them at every turn as they travel to the country of Hidalgo to investigate Doc's father's death and uncover a vast horde of Incan gold. Written by <crow_steve@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

June 1975 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Doc Savage - Der Mann aus Bronze See more »

Filming Locations:

Colorado, USA See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

George Pal Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Fan Edit)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Near the end of the film, Doc drives by a theatre marquee that shows Captain Blood (1935) is playing. See more »

Goofs

Outside the Broadway Ticket Agency, posters on the window are for films, not live shows, which were never sold at such agencies; one of them is for Tarzan and the Leopard Woman, which was released in 1946, not in 1936, the year in which this scene is supposedly taking place. Another is for Bohemian Girl, which would have been OK, except its for the 1946 re-release, and pictures a generic image of Laurel & Hardy, as they often appeared in their other films, but not in this particular one. See more »

Quotes

Doc: Do a Barney Oldfield, Long Tom.
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Crazy Credits

Although all of the other lettering in the opening credits are in yellow, the "USA" in John Philip Sousa's name is in red, white and blue. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Mystery Science Theater 3000: Time of the Apes (1991) See more »

Soundtracks

Final Confrontation
Written and Performed by Frank De Vol And His Orchestra
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User Reviews

 
Disappointing, and I know why...
29 May 2006 | by mhfcaSee all my reviews

I was fortunate enough to meet George Pal (and still have my DS:TMOB poster autographed by him) at a convention shortly after the release, and asked him why he chose to do the film "camp". Before he could answer, two studio flacks intercepted and lectured me on how the studio "knew best" and how "no one will take such a film seriously". I had been reading the Bantam reprints for a couple of years thanks to a friend (ComiCon attendees of the 1970s will recall Blackhawk and his band? I was in a couple of years of that with him), and had higher hopes than what we got.

The flacks insisted that no high adventure would ever be done seriously, and so doing 'camp' was the only way. Several other fans jumped in on my side, with Pal listening as best he could. At the end of the little event, Pal came up to us and apologized, wishing he could have done more and better.

STAR WARS put the lie to the flacks, and a year after Pal's death, Spielberg and Lucas proved that Doc Savage could have easily been the next major movie franchise...if it hadn't been for the flacks.

Tear out the memory or history of Doc, and the film would have been worth a 6/10 rating as nothing more than a mindless popcorn seller.

But destroying the legacy like that was no less an abomination than killing a baby in the crib.

Doc Savage can still come to the screen, and survive the inevitable comparisons by the ill-informed to Indiana Jones, but it would have to be done in all seriousness and earnest to reclaim the glory that we should expect from the First American Superhero.

SIDENOTES: Yes, there was a second script for ARCHENEMY OF EVIL, and it's a lot more serious. Yes, there was simultaneous footage shot, but mostly establishing shots and very little with actors. And, yes, there _is_ a one-sheet of Ron Ely leaping over a brick wall and blasting at something over his shoulder with a specially built bronze pistol. Ely's wearing a duster over a button down white shirt with a bronze tie, and the words "DOC SAVAGE: ARCHENEMY OF EVIL...Coming Next Summer!" POSTSCRIPT: If anyone knows who the studio flacks were that accompanied George Pal in 1975 to San Diego for the convention, smack the idiots up the side of the head and call them the idiots that they are. At the time, they were doing dorkknobs and Fu Manchu in stripes and baggy canvas pants, and carrying Paramount portfolios.


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