6.2/10
5,000
66 user 40 critic

Brannigan (1975)

Chicago Police Lieutenant Jim Brannigan is sent to the U.K. to escort organized crime boss Ben Larkin back to the U.S., but Larkin's hitmen prepare an ambush for Brannigan.

Director:

Douglas Hickox

Writers:

Christopher Trumbo (screenplay), Michael Butler (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
John Wayne ... Lt. Brannigan
Richard Attenborough ... Cmdr. Swann
Judy Geeson ... Jennifer
Mel Ferrer ... Fields
John Vernon ... Larkin
Daniel Pilon ... Gorman
John Stride ... Insp. Traven
James Booth ... Charlie-the-Handle
Arthur Batanides ... Angell
Ralph Meeker ... Capt. Moretti
Barry Dennen ... Julian
Lesley-Anne Down ... Luana (as Lesley Anne Down)
Pauline Delaney ... Mrs Cooper (as Pauline Delany)
Del Henney Del Henney ... Drexel
Brian Glover ... Jimmy-the-Bet
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Storyline

Jim Brannigan is sent to London to bring back an American mobster who is being held for extradition, but when he arrives, he has been kidnapped, which was set up by his lawyer. Brannigan, in his American Irish way, brings American law to the people of Scotland Yard in order to recapture this mobster with a price tag on his head and a stuffy old London cop with whom to contend. Written by Christopher D. Ryan <cryan@direct.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

mailbox | bath | mail | house | bath house | See All (213) »

Taglines:

Big Jim Brannigan takes on London - Chicago Style ! See more »

Genres:

Action | Comedy | Crime

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This was one of the last significant appearances of Tower Bridge without its now-familiar red, white, and blue paint scheme, which was applied in 1977 to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II. See more »

Goofs

While in the yellow Ford Capri, Brannigan chases the assassin who is driving a silver Jaguar. After the silver car jumps the open span of the Tower Bridge, the point of view angle shows the road ahead of him. It reveals a London Bobby in the opposing lane calmly standing in front of the stopped oncoming traffic that he is holding while the scene is shot. See more »

Quotes

Cmdr. Charles Swann: Try not to loose him back in the colonies!
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Crazy Credits

Several of the actors who played minor parts are listed by actor's name in the opening titles but are not listed by actor's name and character's name in the closing credits. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Shaun of the Dead (2004) See more »

Soundtracks

Let the Sunshine In
Music by Galt MacDermot
Lyrics by Gerome Ragni & James Rado
See more »

User Reviews

 
John Wayne swaps the open plains for downtown London - fairly routine but quite good fun.
7 August 2004 | by barnabyrudgeSee all my reviews

After a spate of tired westerns, and unmemorable cop programmers like McQ, John Wayne was in need of something a little fresh. Brannigan doesn't have much in its plot that we haven't seen before, but it is freshened up by its unusual London setting. Nicely directed by Douglas Hickox, and complemented by lots of good supporting performances, it is also entertaining in patches.

Chicago cop, and all-round hard man Jim Brannigan (John Wayne) is ordered to fly out to London, England, to bring back bail-skipping gangster Ben Larkin (John Vernon). But just as Brannigan arrives, Larkin is abducted by a bunch of British crooks who plan to hold him for a hefty ransom. Aided by stiff-lipped Scotland Yard detective Charles Swann (Richard Attenborough), Brannigan attempts to track down the kidnappers so that he can get hold of his man.

Wayne looks pretty old for this kind of energetic action stuff, but he has a certain rugged charisma that allows him to more-or-less get away with it. The supporting cast is generally very good - Attenborough registers well as the Scotland Yard detective; Judy Geeson looks lovely and has a good role as the lady assigned to look after Brannigan during his stay; Vernon adds another unpleasant bad guy to his villains' gallery; and little-known Daniel Pilon has the best scenes in the film as a genuinely evil hit-man assigned to erase Brannigan. The music, scored by Dominic Frontiere, is hilariously '70s and is poured over the action with little consideration. There are also some unnecessary comic moments, such as the needlessly farcical bar-room brawl sequence which is out of tune with the rest of the film (Maltin, preposterously, called the bar-room brawl the high spot of the film but if anything it's the low point). At its worst, Brannigan stoops pretty low, but these low moments are gladly quite sporadic. For most of the way, it's an entertaining - if never truly excellent - star vehicle, and a genuinely "different" role for The Duke.


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Details

Country:

UK | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 March 1975 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Joe Battle See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$4,771,815
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

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