6.6/10
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130 user 93 critic

A Boy and His Dog (1975)

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A young man and his telepathic dog wander a post-apocalyptic wasteland.

Director:

L.Q. Jones

Writers:

L.Q. Jones (screenplay), Harlan Ellison (novel)
Reviews
2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Don Johnson ... Vic
Susanne Benton ... Quilla June Holmes
Jason Robards ... Lou Craddock
Tim McIntire ... Blood (voice)
Alvy Moore ... Dr. Moore
Helene Winston Helene Winston ... Mez Smith
Charles McGraw ... Preacher
Hal Baylor ... Michael
Ron Feinberg ... Fellini
Michael Rupert ... Gery (as Mike Rupert)
Don Carter Don Carter ... Ken
Michael Hershman Michael Hershman ... Richard
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Storyline

A post-apocalyptic tale based on a novella by Harlan Ellison. A boy communicates telepathically with his dog as they scavenge for food and sex, and they stumble into an underground society where the old society is preserved. The daughter of one of the leaders of the community seduces and lures him below, where the citizens have become unable to reproduce because of being underground so long. They use him for impregnation purposes, and then plan to be rid of him. Written by Ed Sutton <esutton@mindspring.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The year is 2024... a future you'll probably live to see. See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 November 1975 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Apocalypse 2024 See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

LQ/JAF See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Ray Manzarek (as Ray Manzarec), keyboardist from The Doors, was a musician on this movie. See more »

Goofs

During Topeka's picnic, there is a grower's label seen on one of the bananas. The fruit is grown hydroponically, not store-bought. See more »

Quotes

Vic: Hell! They didn't have to cut her! She could have been used two or three more times!
Blood: Ah, war is hell.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Bates Motel: A Boy and His Dog (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

When the World Was New
by Richard Gillis
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User Reviews

 
Who's the master?
10 January 2009 | by lost-in-limboSee all my reviews

A frank tale about a recklessly horny boy and his calculative dog sums up this strange, very strange Sci-fi post-apocalyptic wasteland adventure yarn. It's a unique product of the 70s, as it's ambitious, daring and warped in its mind-set that makes this considerably low-budget effort a hypnotic cult item that nothing else would even come close to it. Based upon a novel by Harlan Ellison, the premise follows that of a young loner Vic (splendidly performed by Don Johnson) and his telepathic pooch Blood (exceptionally voiced by Tim McIntire) travelling the desert landscapes caused by the after-effects of WWIV in the search of food, shelter and women.

What goes on to make this film is the biting conversations and budding rapport and dependable friendship between Vic and Blood. It ranged from hysterical to moving, and surprisingly done in a believable manner. The satirical edge to the script is innovatively penned and to the point with its drama, frictions and kinky fixations. Sometimes quite unpleasant in the details where a quirky side is etched and the humour is engraved with a morbid sense of curiosity. While slow-grinding, the pace breezes by and the impulsively random nature helps a lot with a shock ending (twisted but still quite touching though) that comes from nowhere. Director LQ Jones' economical touch makes the most of it limited resources and manages to get plenty out of it despite the minor feel. His use of the camera provocatively achieved and the humming electronic score and playful acoustic cues cement an atmosphere and grow upon the imagination. Mainly consisting in the underground scenes, than on the openly isolated and dusty desert backdrop.

The support cast are picture-perfect in their roles. Susanne Benton shines and likes of Jason Robards, Charles McGraw and Alvy Moore were good fun.

I liked it even more the second time around.


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