Barry Lyndon (1975) - News Poster

(1975)

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‘Call Me by Your Name’ Could Land (at Least) Seven Oscar Nominations: Here’s Why

‘Call Me by Your Name’ Could Land (at Least) Seven Oscar Nominations: Here’s Why
Call Me by Your Name” opened Thanksgiving weekend with stellar reviews and the best limited release numbers of 2017. Sony Pictures Classics acquired the elegiac romantic drama in 2016, and with a finished movie by summer’s end, screened it for Sundance programmers who immediately wanted the film in its lineup.

Now, “Call Me by Your Name” has become a consensus favorite among critics and audiences. It’s simple yet sophisticated, an escapist summer fantasy that feels authentic, and a lovely romance between 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and his professor father’s 24-year-old grad student Oliver (Armie Hammer). And it’s that rare four-quadrant specialty hit: embraced by straights and gays, women and men, young and old.

As classics scholars, Professor Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) and Oliver explore the eroticism of Greek statues and fine art; Perlman admires the Grecian ideal of love between two men; he wishes he had experienced what Elio and Oliver share that summer.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Call Me by Your Name’ Could Land (at Least) Seven Oscar Nominations: Here’s Why

  • Indiewire
‘Call Me by Your Name’ Could Land (at Least) Seven Oscar Nominations: Here’s Why
Call Me by Your Name” opened Thanksgiving weekend with stellar reviews and the best limited release numbers of 2017. Sony Pictures Classics acquired the elegiac romantic drama in 2016, and with a finished movie by summer’s end, screened it for Sundance programmers who immediately wanted the film in its lineup.

Now, “Call Me by Your Name” has become a consensus favorite among critics and audiences. It’s simple yet sophisticated, an escapist summer fantasy that feels authentic, and a lovely romance between 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and his professor father’s 24-year-old grad student Oliver (Armie Hammer). And it’s that rare four-quadrant specialty hit: embraced by straights and gays, women and men, young and old.

As classics scholars, Professor Perlman (Michael Stuhlbarg) and Oliver explore the eroticism of Greek statues and fine art; Perlman admires the Grecian ideal of love between two men; he wishes he had experienced what Elio and Oliver share that summer.
See full article at Indiewire »

Christopher Nolan Reveals the One Question He’d Want to Ask Stanley Kubrick — Listen

Christopher Nolan Reveals the One Question He’d Want to Ask Stanley Kubrick — Listen
If you had one chance to ask Stanley Kubrick one question, what would you ask? It’s a question with hundreds upon hundreds of potential answers given Kubrick’s involvement with such masterpieces as “The Shining,” “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “Barry Lyndon,” and “A Clockwork Orange.” But if you were Christopher Nolan, none of those Kubrick touchstones would be of interest. No, if Nolan could meet Kubrick and ask him one thing, it would be about “Eyes Wide Shut.”

Read More:Christopher Nolan Apologizes For Anti-Netflix Comments, Admits the Streaming Giant is ‘Revolutionary’

The “Dunkirk” director appeared on MTV’s Happy Sad Confused podcast with MTV’s Josh Horowitz this year to promote his WWII survival thriller, and a brief soundbite from the interview in which Nolan is asked what he would want to ask Kubrick if given the opportunity is going viral. Here’s what Nolan wants to know:
See full article at Indiewire »

Cinelinx Movie-Lovers Christmas Gift Guide (2017)

  • Cinelinx
It’s that time of year again when the weather gets cold, and the Christmas decorating/shopping has begun. If you have movie lovers, gamers, or nerds in general, on your shopping list the Cinelinx team is here to help you find the perfect gift with our annual gift guides. Come inside for links to the best movie related gifts you can find!

It’s crazy to think, but the holiday season is already upon us, and those Christmas lists aren’t going to complete themselves. As we’ve done in years past, our team has gathered together to compile a fun, and comprehensive, gift guide for our readers to make sure you can find everything you need.

We’re doing things a bit different this time around, with Three separate lists (one for movies, games, and all things geek) along with individual picks of the week to spotlight some
See full article at Cinelinx »

John Mollo obituary: Star Wars costume designer who dressed Darth Vader

Historical adviser on films such as Barry Lyndon and The Charge of the Light Brigade, who turned designer for the sci-fi epic

John Mollo, who has died aged 86, received his first credit as costume designer on Star Wars (1977). Until then, he had served as historical adviser, with a special interest in costumes, on films including The Charge of the Light Brigade (1968), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971) and Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon (1975). On the last of these, he was responsible for the authenticity of costumes worn by around 250 soldiers from the Irish army who had been hired as extras to portray the forces of England, Prussia and France in the seven years’ war.

But it was Star Wars that transformed Mollo’s career, as was the case for most of the people who worked on it. The artist Ralph McQuarrie had come up with the original paintings for the characters; it was
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Review: Stanley Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon" (1975); Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“The Beauty Of Irony”

By Raymond Benson

Leave it to The Criterion Collection to present a jaw-dropping, eye-popping Blu-ray release of Stanley Kubrick’s 1975 masterpiece that many critics have called one of the most beautiful films ever made. While the picture received many accolades upon its initial release, including Oscar nominations for Picture, Director, Adapted Screenplay—and wins for Cinematography, Production Design, Costumes, and Adapted Score—it was again one those Kubrick films that was controversial and misunderstood at first. It was not a financial success in the U.S., and yet today it’s considered one of the auteur’s greatest works.

After such titles as Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and A Clockwork Orange, it may have seemed to be an odd choice for Kubrick to make a picture such as Barry Lyndon. One must look back to the period between 2001 and Clockwork to understand it. Kubrick
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Criterion Collection: Barry Lyndon (1975) | Blu-ray Review

Within the omnipresent and overpowering narration guiding Barry Lyndon, a passage on the title character’s wife describes her as “not very much more important than the elegant carpets and pictures which form the pleasant background of his existence.” It is an attitude which similarly communicates Stanley Kubrick’s approach to his infamous period piece, a 1975 box office failure which netted a handful of Academy Awards for its stunning visual articulations of the minor 1844 William Makepeace Thackeray novel he adapted it from, and has since been used as evidence to suggest the auteur had reached a point of boredom in his career.

Continue reading...
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Watch: Shooting Barry Lyndon with Candles

Barry Lyndon joined the Criterion Collection last week, and they’ve shared an excerpt from one of the disc’s supplements in which focus puller Douglas Milsorne and gaffer Lou Bogue discuss the difficulty of shooting with all those candles — oxygen got scarce on the ground — and surreptitiously bouncing light to provide the necessary amount of illumination. For more, see this video on various DPs discussing the film’s groundbreaking cinematography and Jim Hemphill’s interview with three of the cast members.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Rushes. byNWR, "She's Gotta Have It" Remake, Manny Farber, Amy Adams

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSNicolas Winding Refn, the provocateur known for sleekly mixing art-house and genre cinema in such films as Drive and The Neon Demon, has announced a new initiative: A new online cinema showcasing "restored films and other content with the aim of inspiring a new generation of cinephiles." Mubi is partnering with the Danish director to premiere these newly restored movies on our platform before they are available on byNWR.com, which officially launches in February, 2018.Recommended VIEWINGThe first trailer for a project we're very excited for, Spike Lee's expansive remake of his sophomore feature She's Gotta Have It (1986).Critics Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin also have a new video essay on the nuances in gesture and expression in the cinema of Rainer Werner Fassbinder for Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. For Filmkrant,
See full article at MUBI »

Pain Pays the Income of Each Precious Thing: Stanley Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon"

  • MUBI
“For an intellectual product of any value to exert an immediate influence which shall also be deep and lasting, it must rest on an inner harmony, yes, an affinity, between the personal destiny of its author and that of his contemporaries in general.”—Thomas Mann, Death in Venice Barry Lyndon. I can’t believe there was a time when I didn’t know that name. Barry Lyndon means an artwork both grand and glum. Sadness inconsolable. A cello bends out a lurid sound, staining the air before a piano droopingly follows in the third movement of Vivaldi's “Cello Concerto in E Minor.” This piece, which dominates the second half of the film, steers the hallowed half of my head to bask in the film’s high melancholic temperature. Why should I so often remember it? What did I have to do with this film? I only received it with
See full article at MUBI »

Nyff Review: ‘Filmworker’ Fails to Probe the Man Behind Stanley Kubrick

Even well before his death in 1999, the life and work of Stanley Kubrick has been meticulously documented and expounded upon to such an extent that a cult of personality has inevitably developed around his universally acclaimed films and his notoriously fastidious, perfectionist tendencies as a filmmaker. But a bonafide auteur is not without his key collaborators. Although he did periodically work with the same crew members — e.g. cinematographer John Alcott and editor Ray Lovejoy — there is only one associate who remained a constant fixture of his late-career output.

Englishman Leon Vitali initially started as a minor, albeit prolific player in theater and television, particularly prestige costume dramas for the BBC during the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. Though Vitali occasionally starred in ultimately negligible films, it wasn’t until 1975 that he got his big break, securing an audition for Kubrick’s newest production, Barry Lyndon. He was handed a script with a single,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Barry Lyndon

Stanley Kubrick’s contribution to great cinema of the 1970s offers his vision of what an epic should be. Transported by images that recall great paintings of the period, and Kubrick’s new approaches to low-light cinematography, we witness a rogue’s progress through troubled times. And even Ryan O’Neal is good!

Barry Lyndon

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 897

1975 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 185 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date October 17, 2017 / 39.95

Starring: Ryan O’Neal, Marisa Berenson, Patrick Magee, Hardy Krüger, Steven Berkoff, Gay Hamilton, Marie Kean, Diana Körner, Murray Melvin, Frank Middlemass, André Morell, Arthur O’Sullivan, Godfrey Quigley, Leonard Rossiter, Philip Stone, Leon Vitali Leon Vitali, Wolf Kahler, Ferdy Mayne, George Sewell, Michael Hordern (narrator).

Cinematography: John Alcott

Editor: Tony Lawson

Production design: Ken Adam

Conductor & Musical Adaptor: Leonard Rosenman

Written by Stanley Kubrick from the novel by William Makepeace Thackeray

Produced and Directed by Stanley Kubrick

The
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

15 Under-the-Radar Highlights at the 55th New York Film Festival

Considering the esteemed level of curation at the New York Film Festival, which begins this Thursday at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, a comprehensive preview could mostly consist of the schedule.

There’s the gala slots (Last Flag Flying, Wonderstruck, and Wonder Wheel), Main Slate selections (featuring Call Me By Your Name, Lady Bird, The Square, Mudbound), two films from Film Twitter phenom Hong Sang-soo, and much more, as well as a 24-film Robert Mitchum retrospective and a delectable line-up of restorations.

So rather than single all of these out for our yearly preview, we’re looking at a handful of under-the-radar highlights from across the festival. Check them out below and return for our coverage.

Before We Vanish (Kiyoshi Kurosawa)

There are few directors who would choose to take a semi-sincere approach to a lengthy pseudo-philosophical science-fiction film — especially not one that lightly pries into our fundamental psychological
See full article at The Film Stage »

1941: A Great Comedy For Slim Pickens Day

On Monday, August 28, 2017, Turner Classic Movies will devote an entire day of their “Summer Under the Stars” series to the late, great Louis Burton Lindley Jr. If that name doesn’t sound familiar, well, then just picture the fella riding the bomb like a buckin’ bronco at the end of Dr. Strangelove…, or the racist taskmaster heading up the railroad gang in Blazing Saddles, or the doomed Sheriff Baker, who gets one of the loveliest, most heartbreaking sendoffs in movie history in Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.

Lindley joined the rodeo circuit when he was 13 and soon picked up the name that would follow him throughout the length of his professional career, in rodeo and in movies & TV. One of the rodeo vets got a look at the lank newcomer and told him, “Slim pickin’s. That’s all you’re gonna get in this rodeo.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup
The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist Gay Talese
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup
The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist
See full article at Indiewire »

On This Day: Basquiat, Last Temptation, Cleopatra

on this day in history as it relates to showbiz

30 BC Cleopatra commits suicide, allegedly by purposeful snake bite. I don't remember that scene in Liz Taylor's Cleopatra but it might have been at the four hour mark and t'was possibly asleep

How to honor this day: play with someone's snake. In the absence of a suitable one, wink at someone as saucily as Liz

← 1915 "Of Human Bondage" by W Somerset Maugham published. 19 years later it becomes a movie and marks Bette Davis's ascent to superstar actress

How to honor this day: Let it all out like Bette in that performance that's pure
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘The Handmaiden’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Tae-ri Kim, Min-hee Kim, Ha Jung-woo, Cho Jin-woong | Written by Chung Seo-kyung, Park Chan-wook | Directed by Park Chan-wook

Based on Sarah Waters’ 2002 novel, Fingersmith, Park Chan-wook’s first feature since 2013’s Stoker is a ravishing feminist fable, full of fantastically cruel twists. It’s sensual, funny, nasty, brilliantly acted, beautifully shot and exquisitely edited.

The setting is 1930s colonial Korea, slap bang in the middle of Japanese rule. Nam Sook-hee (Tae-ri Kim), a young pickpocket, is approached by smooth conman “Count Fujiwara” (Ha Jung-woo), who intends to swindle money from a wealthy Korean aristocrat known as Uncle Kouzuki (Cho Jin-woong). The plan is for Fujiwara to seduce Kouzuki’s niece, Izumi Hideko (Min-hee Kim), and steal away with her uncle’s cash. Sook-hee will act as Hideko’s handmaiden, and help manipulate Hideko into Fujiwara’s arms.

But then an intimate relationship blooms between Hideko and Sook-hee. It seems
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Bad Books That Made Great Films

  • Cinelinx
In reference to movie adaptations of books, it is often said that “the book was better”. This is a look at some of the films where the opposite is true.

When I think about books that have made the transition to the big screen, I consider the reason that those books were chosen for adaptation. A lot of the time, I assume that the books are chosen because of their popularity. Movie studios want to make money, and by making a movie version of a popular book, they can cash in on that popularity. At other times, a book may be chosen because it has a unique concept that would make for an interesting film. In a time when it seems like script writers can’t come up with any new ideas, it makes sense to try and find inspiration in print. Likewise, a book may be chosen because of the person who wrote it.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Joshua Reviews Donna Deitch’s Desert Hearts [Theatrical Review]

For every cult classic like Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me or stone cold classic like Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon, the folks at Janus and The Criterion Collection decide to use their platform to shine a light on some of film’s most interesting unsung gems. Be it from the early days of African cinema, the Romanian New Wave or even American indie cinema of the ‘80s and ‘90s, some of Janus and Criterion’s most interesting theatrical and home video releases are the ones that seemingly come out of nowhere.

Take, for example, Desert Hearts. From director Donna Deitch, Hearts tells the story of Vivian, a conservative, buttoned up English professor caught in the middle of late ‘50s Reno and a going-nowhere marriage. In the midst of a divorce Vivian meets Cay, a gorgeous and vibrant woman who helps not only open Vivian’s eyes to herself but to the world around her.
See full article at CriterionCast »
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