Young Frankenstein (1974) - News Poster

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Review: Robin Hood: Men In Tights (1993), one of Mel Brooks' more underrated endeavours

I can’t say I grew up enjoying Mel Brooks’ movies; I actually watched his classics, such as “Young Frankenstein” and “Blazing Saddles”, when I was at university. But there’s one picture that I actually remember from my childhood, one comedy that has always managed to make me laugh, despite (or maybe because of) its childish antics: “Robin Hood: Men in Tights”. The first time I watched it I was about eight or nine; I was at a friend’s house, and I remember we both laughed our little butts off at pretty much ever gag, every satirical jab and every juvenile joke. And now, twenty years and many lousy Hollywood parodies later, it is still pretty funny. Maybe not as hilarious as when I was a...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘Solo: A Star Wars Story,’ ‘Coco’ Composers Honored at Ascap Screen Music Awards

‘Solo: A Star Wars Story,’ ‘Coco’ Composers Honored at Ascap Screen Music Awards
Composers John Powell and Germaine Franco took top honors at Wednesday night’s Screen Music Awards of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (Ascap) at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.

Powell, composer of the Oscar-nominated score for “How to Train Your Dragon” and the new “Solo: A Star Wars Story,” received the Henry Mancini Award for his “outstanding achievements and contributions to the world of film and television music.”

Franco, songwriter and arranger of last year’s “Coco” who was also recently named “one of 15 Latinas who are changing the world” by Univision, received the Shirley Walker Award, given to a composer “whose achievements have contributed to the diversity of film and television music.”

Both composers spent more time talking about the composers in whose honor the awards were named, rather than about themselves or their own music. Before the ceremony, Powell told Variety that he met Mancini when
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Solo: A Star Wars Story,’ ‘Coco’ Composers Honored at Ascap Screen Music Awards

‘Solo: A Star Wars Story,’ ‘Coco’ Composers Honored at Ascap Screen Music Awards
Composers John Powell and Germaine Franco took top honors at Wednesday night’s Screen Music Awards of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (Ascap) at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.

Powell, composer of the Oscar-nominated score for “How to Train Your Dragon” and the new “Solo: A Star Wars Story,” received the Henry Mancini Award for his “outstanding achievements and contributions to the world of film and television music.”

Franco, songwriter and arranger of last year’s “Coco” who was also recently named “one of 15 Latinas who are changing the world” by Univision, received the Shirley Walker Award, given
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Sorry About That, Chief: Revisiting the Secret World of 'Get Smart'

The Classic TV series Get Smart introduced the world to Don Adams as Maxwell Smart, secret agent 86, and Barbara Feldon as Agent 99, both working for the secret government agency Control and taking on the world-threatening Kaos. The show itself is a full-blown parody of the spymania boom created by the James Bond films throughout the 1960s, though what's interesting is that a spoof usually comes at the end of a creative cycle, many of them signaling a last gasp of sorts from whatever subject is being parodied. Get Smart, on the other hand, came three years into the boom. When the show premiered in the fall of 1965, there had only been three 007 movies, with things really exploding at the end of that year with the release of the fourth, Thunderball. Donna McChrohan Rosenthal, author of the non-fiction exploration of the show The Life and Times of Maxwell Smart, explains in an exclusive interview,
See full article at Closer Weekly »

‘The Producers’ Turns 50: Mel Brooks Explains Why His Subversive Comedy Is Still Relevant — TCM Fest

‘The Producers’ Turns 50: Mel Brooks Explains Why His Subversive Comedy Is Still Relevant — TCM Fest
Without “The Producers,” there might never have been “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein,” and “Spaceballs.” And yet Mel Brooks’ movie debut (which earned him the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay) was the most original work of his career, combining subversive humor with a tender bromance between Zero Mostel’s Max Bialystock and Gene Wilder’s Leo Bloom. This was no genre bender, but it was a cultural assault on fascism and complacency, and it was ahead of its time in elevating the Lgbt artistic community.

In honor of its 50th anniversary, “The Producers” opens the TCM Classic Film Festival Thursday night at the Chinese Theater IMAX in Hollywood with a digital 4k restoration courtesy by Studiocanal. For the 91-year-old Brooks, the cult favorite-turned comedy classic was a miracle that launched his celebrated film career as writer-director.

“It was very simple: You can make more money with a flop than with a hit,
See full article at Indiewire »

2018 Olivier Awards: ‘Hamilton’ wins record 7, ‘The Ferryman’ takes 3

2018 Olivier Awards: ‘Hamilton’ wins record 7, ‘The Ferryman’ takes 3
Two years after sweeping the Tony Awards, Lin-Manuel Miranda‘s musical “Hamilton” did the same at the British equivalent, the Olivier Awards, on April 8. It won seven of its record 13 bids, including Best Musical. While that haul matched that of another tuner, “Matilda,” it fell two short of the benchmark set last year by the play “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”

On the play side, the big winner was Jez Butterworth‘s “The Ferryman,” a dark drama about the Irish troubles, which is set to come to Broadway in the fall. It only won three of its eight races but they were biggies: Best Play, Best Director (Sam Mendes) and Best Actress (Laura Donnelly). Bryan Cranston claimed the Best Actor prize for the stage version of the 1976 Oscar-winning film “Network.” Peter Finch had won the Oscar for playing Howard Beale, a TV anchor gone mad.

See 2018 Olivier Awards: Complete
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Hamilton’ Breaks Record for Most Olivier Award Nominations Ever

Announced in London by Elaine Paige and Alexandra Burke, the 2018 Laurence Olivier Award nominations represented the U.K.’s most thrilling and boundary-pushing theater of the last year. As it did during its U.S. conception, “Hamilton” dominated the list in 13 places, setting a new record for most Olivier nods for a single production ever. Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hit musical about the Founding Fathers smashed box office records even before its Broadway opening in 2015, and eventually scored 11 Tony Award wins. The West End production of “Hamilton,” now playing at the Victoria Palace Theatre, will now compete at the Tonys of the U.K. alongside fellow 2018 Best New Musical nominees “An American In Paris” at the Dominion Theatre, “Everybody's Talking About Jamie” at the Apollo Theatre, “Girl From The North Country” at The Old Vic, and “Young Frankenstein” at the Garrick Theatre. This year’s most-recognized new play is Jez Butterworth
See full article at Backstage »

2018 Olivier Awards nominations: ‘Hamilton’ lands record 13, ‘The Ferryman’ leads among plays with 8

2018 Olivier Awards nominations: ‘Hamilton’ lands record 13, ‘The Ferryman’ leads among plays with 8
Two years after sweeping the Tony Awards, Lin-Manuel Miranda‘s musical “Hamilton” is poised to do the same at the British equivalent, the Olivier Awards. On March 6, it reaped a record 13 bids for these top theater prizes, shattering the record set by the musical “Hairspray” in 2008 and equalled by the play “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” last year. On the play side, the leading contender is Jez Butterworth‘s “The Ferryman,” a dark drama about the Irish troubles which is set to come to Broadway in the fall.

Winners will be announced in a ceremony at London’s Royal Albert Hall on April 8 hosted by Catherine Tate. Unlike the Tony Awards, which are showcased live on CBS, the Olivier Awards get only a clips package on ITV later that evening and a live feed on BBC Radio 2.

Hamilton” is clearly the frontrunner for Best Musical. Conor McPherson’s “Girl From The North Country,
See full article at Gold Derby »

John Morris, ‘Blazing Saddles’ and ‘Young Frankenstein’ Composer, Dies at 91

  • The Wrap
John Morris, ‘Blazing Saddles’ and ‘Young Frankenstein’ Composer, Dies at 91
John Morris, who provided the score for many of Mel Brooks’ films including “Blazing Saddles” and “Young Frankenstein,” died Thursday at age 91, according to his daughter, Bronwen Morris. Morris’ partnership with Brooks dates back to 1967, when he wrote the score for Brooks’ film, “The Producers,” as well as the original arrangement for the musical’s showstopping number “Springtime for Hitler.” Morris received Oscar nominations for the title song from “Blazing Saddles” and another for the score for the 1980 drama “The Elephant Man,” which Brooks produced. He also received a Grammy nomination for his “Elephant Man” score. Morris’ other credits...
See full article at The Wrap »

John Morris, ‘Blazing Saddles’ and ‘Young Frankenstein’ Composer, Dies at 91

John Morris, Oscar-nominated, Emmy-winning composer for many of the classic Mel Brooks comedies including “Blazing Saddles” and “Young Frankenstein,” died Thursday at his home in Red Hook, N.Y. He was 91.

Morris was Oscar-nominated for co-writing, with Brooks, the title song for “Blazing Saddles” – a sendup of classic movie cowboy tunes sung by Frankie Laine for the opening of Brooks’ 1974 film. Morris was nominated again in 1980 for his dramatic score for the Brooks-produced “The Elephant Man.”

Morris served as Brooks’ composer beginning with “The Producers” in 1967; he wrote the original arrangement for Brooks’ famous “Springtime for Hitler” song, and composed the rest of the underscore.

Morris’ most famous score is undoubtedly “Young Frankenstein,” for which he composed a memorable violin theme that plays a key role in the story. Under the title “Transylvanian Lullaby,” it has even been performed by top classical artists from violinist Gil Shaham to the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

The composer
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gene Wilder's Widow Pens a Touching, Candid, Heartfelt Letter about His Alzheimer’s Disease

My grandma had Alzheimer’s Disease. In the years before she passed away, every time I visited her, she became less and less like the person I had come to know and love throughout my life. It was especially hard when she forgot who I was and who her kids were. She was still very sweet, though, and at times her true self would shine through.

Just in case you need a little recap of what Alzheimer's disease is, it's a progressive disease that destroys memory and other important mental functions. One of my favorite actors of all time, Gene Wilder, suffered from this illness, and his widow, Karen Wilder, recently opened up about what it was like for her and Gene after he was diagnosed with it.

I know this is a geek site, but this was such a touching, candid, and heartfelt letter that I wanted to share.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Watch The Trailer for Laddie, A Documentary About The Man Who Made Star Wars Happen

George Lucas may be known as the father of Star Wars, but Lucas may have never had the chance to make the movie the way he did if it weren't for Alan Ladd, Jr.(known as “Laddie” to his friends). Now a new documentary dives into Ladd’s career as an agent, producer, executive, and studio head, where he worked on movies ranging from Blade Runner to Young Frankenstein.

Check out the Laddie trailer:

The documentary is made by Ladd’s daughter, filmmaker Amanda Ladd-Jones. She was able to speak with some of Hollywood's elite including Ridley Scott, Morgan Freeman, and Sigourney Weaver to talk about their interactions with her father.

When Ladd was at Fox, he saw potential in Lucas where others did not. Lucas credited Ladd by saying that he “invested in me, he did not invest in the movie,” and Ladd’s foresight is ultimately the
See full article at GeekTyrant »

"Silent Running" 45Th Anniversary Screening, L.A., December 13

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Douglas Trumbull’s 1972 film Silent Running celebrates its 45th anniversary with a special screening at Laemmle's Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre in Los Angeles. Starring Bruce Dern, Cliff Potts, and Ron Rifkin, the G-rated film runs 89 minutes and is being showcased on the big screen in a rare opportunity.

Please Note: Director Douglas Trumbull and Producer Michael Gruskoff are scheduled to appear in person for a Q & A following the screening.

From the press release:

Silent Running (1972)

45th Anniversary Screening

Wednesday, December 13, at 7:30pm at the Ahrya Fine Arts

Q&A with Special Guests Director Douglas Trumbull and Producer Michael Gruskoff

Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series present a 45th anniversary screening of the groundbreaking sci-fi movie Silent Running which marked the directorial debut of special effects wizard Douglas Trumbull. Set 100 years in the future, the prophetic script by Deric Washburn, Michael Cimino, and Steven Bochco
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Jacob Tremblay, Christopher Lloyd, Kenan Thompson Join Voice Cast of Lani Pixels Movie

Jacob Tremblay, Christopher Lloyd, Kenan Thompson Join Voice Cast of Lani Pixels Movie
Lani Pixels has signed Jacob Tremblay, Christopher Lloyd, Kenan Thompson, and Mel Brooks as the voice cast in an untitled 3D animated feature directed by Kim Pagel.

Thomas Pagel, who co-founded Lani Pixels with Kim Pagel, is producing with Jason Mirch co-producing. Verité Entertainment’s René Veilleux and Donald Roman Lopez are associate producing.

The movie follows a brother and sister as they attempt to rescue their grandfather from supernatural forces that have invaded his isolated island. Guided by a charming Irish rogue, the siblings end up on a dangerous journey filled with magic and mystery. Production and additional casting are currently underway.

“It is an honor to be working with such a talented and dynamic cast on this project,” said Kim Pagel. “While this has been a passion project for many years, the themes of family unity and courage in the face of adversity are particularly important these days.”

Tremblay is starring
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Here’s What’s Leaving Netflix in December 2017

Although Netflix is adding a solid selection of titles in December, the changing of the months means we also have to say good-bye to some shows, whether their licenses have run out, if they’re moving to a new streaming service, or if they’re just being temporarily removed. In December, Netflix will lose Black Snake Moan, Terriers, Young Frankenstein, Nightcrawler, The Queen of Versailles, Amores Perros, Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, and 11 seasons of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia among others. If you were planning to watch or rewatch any of …
See full article at Collider.com »

1 of Your Favorite Disney Movies Is Disappearing From Netflix Next Month

  • BuzzSugar
December is the month of giving, but that hasn't stopped Netflix from taking away some of our favorite shows and movies. While there are some great titles heading our way next month, we'll also have to part ways with a number of classics, namely those scary movies you binge-watched in October. See what's leaving below. Related46 New Titles Are Coming to Netflix in November to Help You Survive Thanksgiving Dec. 1 All I Want For Christmas Bedazzled Black Snake Moan Compulsion Cousin Bette Hoffa La Viuda Negra, season one Picture Perfect Practical Magic Rebelde Scary Movie 2 Scary Movie 3 Super Size Me Terriers, season one The Crucible The Gospel Road: A Story of Jesus The Man from Snowy River Touch, season two Toys Two Girls and a Guy Waking Life Young Frankenstein Yu-Gi-Oh! Bonds Beyond Time Yu-Gi-Oh! Zexal, seasons one-two Dec. 5 Holes Dec. 9 It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, seasons 1-11 Dec.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

William Friedkin on the Power of Film, Capital Punishment and his Recklessness on ‘The French Connection’

William Friedkin on the Power of Film, Capital Punishment and his Recklessness on ‘The French Connection’
Lyon — Director William Friedkin, maker of “The French Connection” and “The Exorcist,” in Lyon for a showcase of his work, proved his storytelling prowess at a master class on Thursday as he captivated the audience with anecdotes of his illustrious career.

Particularly moving was the account of his first work, the 1962 documentary “The People vs. Paul Crump.”

After meeting the chaplain of the Cook County jail and learning about a young black man on death row named Paul Crump that both the pastor and the warden believed to be innocent, Friedkin visited the inmate and likewise became convinced of his innocence. He set out to make a documentary about the case in the hope of saving his life.

“A confession was beaten out of him by the Chicago police, which was done routinely in those days. If there was an African American accused of a crime they would go into the African American community and round up the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Frankenstein Double Feature: Bride Of Frankenstein and Young Frankenstein Oct. 20th at Washington University

“We belong…Dead!”

Please join Washington University’s Film and Media Studies and the Center for the Humanities as they celebrate the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein with a free screening of Bride of Frankenstein (1935) and Young Frankenstein (1974). The event takes place at Brown Hall, Room 100, Washington University in St. Louis Friday October 20th, 2017 at 7.00 pm. This is a Free event and there will be free popcorn and soda there as well.

Two hundred years have passed since Mary Shelley, the British novelist and dramatist, published her novel Frankenstein. Since that moment, her creation has not only caused a big impact in the literary world, but also in cinema, an art that was not even alive when the monster was born. In celebration of Frankenstein’s upcoming birthday, Film and Media Studies and the Center for the Humanities at Washington University in St. Louis is organizing a free
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Mel Brooks: ‘Blazing Saddles’ Would Never Be Made in Today’s ‘Stupidly Politically Correct’ Culture

Mel Brooks: ‘Blazing Saddles’ Would Never Be Made in Today’s ‘Stupidly Politically Correct’ Culture
Blazing Saddles” may be a groundbreaking comedy, but director Mel Brooks doesn’t think Hollywood would make the iconic Western parody in this current “stupidly politically correct” climate.

The Oscar winner discussed PC culture in a recent interview with BBC Radio 4, calling it “the death of comedy.”

“No, no, I mean maybe ‘Young Frankenstein.’ Maybe a few. But never ‘Blazing Saddles,’ because we have become stupidly politically correct, which is the death of comedy,” he said when asked if he thinks he could get films like “Blazing Saddles,” “The Producers,” or “Young Frankenstein” made today. “It’s okay not to hurt feelings of various tribes and groups. However, it’s not good for comedy. Comedy has to walk a thin line, take risks. Comedy is the lecherous little elf whispering into the king’s ear, always telling the truth about human behavior.”

Blazing Saddles,” a Western spoof about a black sheriff in a racist town, starring
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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