8.0/10
141,475
374 user 124 critic

Young Frankenstein (1974)

PG | | Comedy | 15 December 1974 (USA)
Trailer
2:39 | Trailer
An American grandson of the infamous scientist, struggling to prove that his grandfather was not as insane as people believe, is invited to Transylvania, where he discovers the process that reanimates a dead body.

Director:

Mel Brooks

Writers:

Gene Wilder (screen story and screenplay), Mel Brooks (screen story and screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Popularity
597 ( 149)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 11 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Gene Wilder ... Dr. Frederick Frankenstein
Peter Boyle ... The Monster
Marty Feldman ... Igor
Madeline Kahn ... Elizabeth
Cloris Leachman ... Frau Blücher
Teri Garr ... Inga
Kenneth Mars ... Inspector Kemp
Richard Haydn ... Herr Falkstein
Liam Dunn ... Mr. Hilltop
Danny Goldman ... Medical Student
Oscar Beregi Jr. ... Sadistic Jailor (as Oscar Beregi)
Arthur Malet ... Village Elder
Richard A. Roth Richard A. Roth ... Insp. Kemp's Aide (as Richard Roth)
Monte Landis Monte Landis ... Gravedigger
Rusty Blitz Rusty Blitz ... Gravedigger
Edit

Storyline

A young neurosurgeon (Gene Wilder) inherits the castle of his grandfather, the famous Dr. Victor von Frankenstein. In the castle he finds a funny hunchback called Igor, a pretty lab assistant named Inga and the old housekeeper, frau Blucher -iiiiihhh!-. Young Frankenstein believes that the work of his grandfather is only crap, but when he discovers the book where the mad doctor described his reanimation experiment, he suddenly changes his mind... Written by Flavio Rizzardi <spillo@maya.dei.unpid.it>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Come Early... Get a Seat! See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The idea of Frederick's dart hitting a cat was ad-libbed on-set. When Gene Wilder threw his dart off camera, director Mel Brooks quickly screamed like a cat to create the illusion. See more »

Goofs

When the policeman confronts the chained-up Creature in the jail, he pulls a cigarette from behind his ear, grabs a match and lights it. He notices the Creature doesn't like fire. When he grabs a second match to scare the Creature, it looks as if his cigarette is inexplicably back behind his ear again. But for a fraction of a second at the very start of the shot, his left hand is actually on the cigarette, putting it there. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: If we look at the base of a brain, which has just been removed from the skull, there's very little of the mid-brain that we can actually see. Yet, as I demonstrated in my lecture last week, if the under aspects of the temporal lobes are gently pulled apart, the upper portion of the stem of the brain can be seen. The so-called "brain stem" consists of the mid-brain, a rounded protrusion called the pons, and a stalk tapering downwards called the medulla oblongata, which passes out of...
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

Michael Fox and Lidia Kristen, who play Helga's parents, are listed in the opening credits, but not in the end credits, while Helga is referred to on-screen by name, but is only credited as "Little Girl." See more »

Alternate Versions

In some versions of the movie, a scene which showed Dr. Frankenstein demonstrating the Monster's power of balance by placing an empty milk bottle in one of the creature's hands, and a full milk bottle in the other hand, was later cut. For years, the only existing media of this scene was a photo in the paperback book of YF. However, in fall 2008, footage of this scene finally appeared on the blu-ray edition of the film, in which two angles of the missing scene were shown. See more »

Connections

Referenced in This Is Us: A Father's Advice (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

The Battle Hymn of the Republic
(uncredited)
Music by William Steffe
Lyrics by Julia Ward Howe
Performed by Madeline Kahn
See more »

User Reviews

 
Young Frankenstein
4 June 1999 | by Coxer99See all my reviews

Zany spoof of the Frankenstein films with a superb script from Brooks and off the wall performances from Wilder, Boyle, Leachman and Kahn. Still, the funniest scene in the film belongs to Hackman, in an impressive cameo as the blind man (Bride of Frankenstein) who befriends Boyle's creature by offering him a cigar and...well, you can imagine the results. This was Brooks' best year; he had this and his other classic "Blazing Saddles," rolling together in the motion theatres. Audiences were definately rolling in the aisles and they still do.


61 of 79 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 374 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

15 December 1974 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Young Frankenstein See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$2,800,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$86,273,333

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$86,273,333
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed