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The Tamarind Seed (1974) Poster

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Final cinema movie of actor Oskar Homolka.
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Star Julie Andrews once said of this movie in mid-1973: "This is a nice film. It's just right for my comeback".
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Oskar Homolka replaced Jack Hawkins in playing the character of General Golitsyn. The role had originally been intended for Hawkins, but his death in 1973 led to the part being re-cast with Homolka.
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Actress Julie Andrews and director Blake Edwards were married.
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One of numerous collaborations of star-actress Julie Andrews and writer-director Blake Edwards.
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One of two consecutive espionage cinema movies that actress Julie Andrews made with her husband writer-director Blake Edwards. The pictures are Darling Lili (1970) and The Tamarind Seed (1974). Earlier, Andrews had recently starred in Alfred Hitchcock's spy film Torn Curtain (1966).
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The three things that Jack Loder (Anthony Quayle) had learned from working in British Intelligence were (1) No one's to be trusted (2) Nothing is to be believed and (3) Anyone is capable of doing anything.
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First big major cinema movie produced by production company Lorimar Films. The production house, now known as Lorimar Productions, predominantly produced for television, but had previously made the theatrical feature film The Sporting Club (1971).
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The Wikipedia website states that, according to the book "Lew Grade, Still Dancing: My Story" (1987), "the film was partly financed by Sir Lew Grade as part of a two-movie deal to get [Julie] Andrews to commit to a TV show" and "Lew Grade said the film 'did fairly well' at the box office, but that he struggled to make much money out of the movie because Blake Edwards and Julie Andrews took such a large percentage of the profits (Andrews 10% of the gross, Edwards 5%)".
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The name of the yacht seen at the end of the movie was the "Calita VII" of the Port of La Guaira.
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The film was nominated for a BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actress for Sylvia Syms but lost out to Ingrid Bergman for Murder on the Orient Express (1974).
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The names of the intelligence agencies featured in the film included MI6, the KGB, and the Home Office.
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One of two 1974 features directed by Blake Edwards which were first released or broadcast in that year. The movies are the theatrical feature film The Tamarind Seed (1974) and the tele-movie Julie and Dick at Covent Garden (1974). Both titles starred Edwards' wife Julie Andrews.
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Both of the film's lead stars, Omar Sharif and Julie Andrews, had both starred in famous classic movies which had been both released in the year of 1965, they being Doctor Zhivago (1965) and The Sound of Music (1965) respectively.
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Actress Julie Andrews does not sing in this major motion picture.
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Many movie posters for the film featured a long text preamble that read: "Julie Andrews) and Omar Sharif . . . together as only lovers world apart can be. The Tamarind Seed . . . where love grows and passion flowers".
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The old black-and-white espionage movie seen playing on the television was Alfred Hitchcock's Foreign Correspondent (1940). Star Julie Andrews had previously worked with Hitch on Torn Curtain (1966). Both that movie and The Tamarind Seed (1974) are cold war thrillers.
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The movie wrapped three days ahead of it shooting schedule.
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The picture was completed under its forecasted budgeted cost.
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First film in four years for actress Julie Andrews whose last picture at the time had been Darling Lili (1970).
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The name of the exhibits archive in Barbados where a tamarind seed was displayed was "The Bridgetown Museum".
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This espionage picture utilized two key major creative personnel who had been synonymous with the official James Bond film franchise: John Barry, who composed the film's score, was a composer of many of the Bond movie's music scores up until The Living Daylights (1987), whilst Maurice Binder, who designed the opening titles sequence, had done the same for most of the Bond films up until Licence to Kill (1989). Moreover, actor Terence Plummer, who played a KGB Agent in The Tamarind Seed (1974), portrayed a Beirut thug in the same year's Bond picture The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), and later, one of Elliot Carver's thugs in Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) - both parts uncredited. About 007 other crew members worked on both The Tamarind Seed (1974) and The Man with the Golden Gun (1974).
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This romantic spy movie, which is partially set in Barbados, was first released in the same year as the James Bond film The Man with the Golden Gun (1974). Ian Fleming's "The Man with the Golden Gun" (1965) novel was partially set in Jamaica. Both Jamaica and Barbados are island countries situated in the Caribbean Sea region.
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The code-name for the unknown double agent in British Intelligence was "BLUE".
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The name of the movie's 1975 MAD Magazine parody was a comic-strip entitled "The Tommy-Red Seed".
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The movie's closing credits declare that the picture was "filmed through the facilities of Samuelson Film Service Pty Ltd, London, England and on location in London, Paris and Barbados".
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"The Legend of the Tamarind Seed" as typed in the museum display case card and also read out by Judith Farrow (Julie Andrews) in the film states: "A slave on Hayward's Plantation, St. Peter, accused of stealing a sheep, was hanged from a tamarind tree; he protested his innocence, saying that the tree would vindicate him. Since then the tamarind tree has born a seed in the shape of a man's head".
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This romantic spy movie was first released in the same year as the James Bond film The Man with the Golden Gun (1974). The Tamarind Seed (1974) was the second of 007 collaborations of husband writer-director Blake Edwards and wife star-actress Julie Andrews.
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The only ever filmed adaptation for screen or television from a story or novel by source authoress Evelyn Anthony.
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Egyptian movie star Omar Sharif played a Russian character as he had famously previously done in Doctor Zhivago (1965) around nine years earlier. Both films also utilized the same cinematographer with the use of director of photography Freddie Young. Moreover, both pictures also utilized the same sound editor, Winston Ryder.
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One of two 1974 theatrical feature films starring actor Omar Sharif which were first released in that year. The movies are Juggernaut (1974) and The Tamarind Seed (1974).
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Of the three motion pictures scored by composer John Barry that debuted in 1974, two were spy films, The Tamarind Seed (1974) and The Man with the Golden Gun (1974). The other picture was The Dove (1974).
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Blake Edwards performed dual roles on this film, as director and screenwriter, but did not act as a producer, as Edwards has done on a number of other pictures.
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One of numerous collaborations of actor-producer Ken Wales and writer-director Blake Edwards.
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The film's opening credits declare: "All characters and events in this film are fictitious. Any similarity to actual events or persons, living or dead, is quite unintentional."
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Post-production was conducted in London in England at two British film studios: Pinewood Studios and Shepperton Studios.
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Screenwriter Earl Hamner Jr. was originally attached to pen the screenplay according to the 24th December 1971 edition of show-business trade paper 'The Hollywood Reporter'. The script was written but was not used when writer-director 'Blake Edwards' became attached to the production in these two capacities. The hiring of Edwards was announced in the 21st March 1973 edition of show-business trade paper 'Variety'. Hamner's screenplay was apparently "discarded", and if any of it was used, Hamner was not billed for any of the movie's script-writing.
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The film was made and released about three years after its source novel of the same name by Evelyn Anthony had been first published in 1971.
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The name of the medical facility in Bridgetown, Barbados where Judith Farrow (Julie Andrews) recovered was the "St. Patricia Nursing Home".
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The name of the actor who played one of the foreign agents, the character billed as the 2nd KGB Agent, was Terence Plummer. Star Julie Andrews had famously previously star-teamed with Christopher Plummer in The Sound of Music (1965) around nine years earlier.
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The name of the night-spot that Judith Farrow (Julie Andrews) and Feodor Sverdlov Omar Sharif) went to in Bridgetown, Barbados was "The Colony Club".
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The name of the movie's source novelist, Evelyn Anthony, is a pen-name for her real name of "Evelyn Ward-Thomas", aka in full, "Evelyn Bridgett Patricia Ward-Thomas".
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A tamarind seed grows into a tamarind tree. The Wikipedia website states: A "Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) is a leguminous tree in the family Fabaceae indigenous to tropical Africa. The genus Tamarindus is a monotypic taxon, having only a single species".
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American movie posters boldly headlined in the above-the-title star-billing of Julie Andrews and Omar Sharif that the picture was "a Blake Edwards film", which in a sense gave the director top first billing over the two star leads.
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One of two 1974 features starring actress Julie Andrews which were first released or broadcast in that year. The titles are the theatrical feature film The Tamarind Seed (1974) and the tele-movie Julie and Dick at Covent Garden (1974). Both features were directed by Andrews' husband Blake Edwards.
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