The Rockford Files (1974–1980)
8.1/10
613
11 user 4 critic

Backlash of the Hunter 

Jim helps a young girl (Lindsay Wagner) whose father was murdered and LAPD has closed the case on without finding the killer.

Director:

Richard T. Heffron

Writers:

Stephen J. Cannell (teleplay by), Roy Huggins (story by) (as John Thomas James)
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

Photos

Edit

Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
James Garner ... Jim Rockford
Lindsay Wagner ... Sara Butler
William Smith ... Jerry Grimes
Nita Talbot ... Mildred Elias
Joe Santos ... Dennis Becker
Robert Donley Robert Donley ... Joseph 'Rocky' Rockford
Stuart Margolin ... Angel Martin
Bill Mumy ... Nick Butler
Pat Renella Pat Renella ... Morrie Talbot
Michael Lerner ... Dr. Ruben Seelman
Ted Gehring ... Norm Mitchell
Joshua Bryant ... Capt. Harry Dell
Bill Quinn ... Harry Butler
Robert B. Williams ... Arnold Demura
Claude Johnson Claude Johnson ... Officer
Edit

Storyline

Private investigator Jim Rockford is hired by a beautiful young woman to solve the murder of her father, a homeless man found beneath a pier two months earlier. The killing was never solved by the police. Written by Marty McKee <mmckee@wkio.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

27 March 1974 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Die schwarze Witwe See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Originally shown as a 2-hour movie pilot, it was not part of the original numbering of the series. Later it was added on as episode '0', and it was also later shown in 2 parts; both as a repeat, and in syndication. See more »

Goofs

During the car chase near the end of the show (just before the airplane shows up), the rear window of Rockford's car is missing and then reappears. The window continues to disappear and reappear several times. See more »

Quotes

Nick Butler: You're a cop, huh?
Jim Rockford: No, what I am sonny, is about fifty pounds heavier and one hell of a lot meaner so you better straighten up your act, I don't think I like you.
See more »

Alternate Versions

Syndicated repeats are split into two parts, with an alternate opening sequence that features the series' title card over a shot of Rockford's mobile home with the answering machine message, regarding Lt. Chapman's birthday, playing in the background. This opening removes any shots of Noah Beery as he does not appear in the episode. See more »

Connections

Followed by The Rockford Files: Deadlock in Parma (1980) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

And no answering machine in sight.
8 February 2004 | by Victor FieldSee all my reviews

"The Rockford Files" was never a big ratings success, but it found its audience during its six-year run, and to this day is liked by many who watched it in first-run episodes and repeats. The pilot TV movie has all of the elements that made the series so well-remembered; James Garner's performance as wrongfully imprisoned ex-con and now private investigator Jim Rockford; the laid-back Southern California settings; his supportive-if-old-cootish dad Rocky (played here by Robert Donley instead of Noah Beery), police contact Becker and parolee friend Angel; and Stephen J. Cannell's writing (David Chase may get a lot of the credit these days because of "The Sopranos," but the fact that Cannell's best known creation is "The A-Team" overlooks his having more in his arsenal than just the four members of a crack commando unit). The mystery - a pre-Jaime Sommers Lindsay Wagner hires our hero to find out who killed her father - and the characterisation exist side by side, and if it isn't exactly hardboiled it does make you want to watch more episodes of the series. Pilots have to introduce the characters, make you want to see more of them, and tell good stories. The cast, director Richard T. Heffron, Cannell and the late Roy Huggins (aka John Thomas James) succeeded on all three counts.


18 of 18 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 11 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed