An ambitious reporter gets in way-over-his-head trouble while investigating a senator's assassination which leads to a vast conspiracy involving a multinational corporation behind every event in the world's headlines.

Director:

Alan J. Pakula

Writers:

David Giler (screenplay), Lorenzo Semple Jr. (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Warren Beatty ... Joseph Frady
Paula Prentiss ... Lee Carter
William Daniels ... Austin Tucker
Walter McGinn ... Jack Younger
Hume Cronyn ... Bill Rintels
Kelly Thordsen ... Sheriff L.D. Wicker
Chuck Waters ... Thomas Richard Linder
Earl Hindman ... Deputy Red
William Joyce ... Senator Charles Carroll (as Bill Joyce)
Betty Murray Betty Murray ... Mrs. Charles Carroll (as Bettie Johnson)
Bill McKinney ... Parallax Assassin
Jo Ann Harris ... Chrissy - Frady's Girl (as JoAnne Harris)
Ted Gehring ... Schecter - Hotel Clerk
Lee Pulford Lee Pulford ... Shirley - Salmontail Bar Girl
Doria Cook-Nelson ... Gale from Salmontail (as Doria Cook)
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Storyline

Joe Frady is a determined reporter who often needs to defend his work from colleagues. After the assassination of a prominent U.S. senator, Frady begins to notice that reporters present during the assassination are dying mysteriously. After getting more involved in the case, Frady begins to realize that the assassination was part of a conspiracy somehow involving the Parallax Corporation, an enigmatic training institute. He then decides to enroll for the Parallax training himself to discover the truth. Written by Philip Brubaker <coda@nando.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

There is no conspiracy. Just twelve people dead. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Thriller

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

This film is part of the Criterion Collection, spine #1,064. See more »

Goofs

Bill Rintels takes the lid off the coffee cup he just has been delivered and throws it in what is supposed to be an office garbage bin. You can clearly hear the lid hitting the floor and taking a second to stabilize. See more »

Quotes

Sheriff L.D. Wicker: [Frady just beat up Deputy Red.] You just come over here and sit down. You're alright, son.
Joseph Frady: Listen, you wouldn't be offended if I called the police, would you?
Sheriff L.D. Wicker: No, but you don't have to call very far because Red's a deputy. And if that isn't good enough, I'm the sheriff.
Joseph Frady: You got some interesting ideas about law enforcement.
Sheriff L.D. Wicker: I could have stopped the fight. I would have if you'd have been gettin' whipped, but I dearly love seeing ol' Red get stomped.
Joseph Frady: He's your deputy?
Sheriff L.D. Wicker: Well, you see he's my sister's boy....
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Connections

Referenced in Mr. Robot: eps2.0_unm4sk-pt2.tc (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Wild and Woolly West
Written by Paul Francis Webster and Sammy Fain
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User Reviews

 
A Triumph in Cinematography as Seeing
15 January 2003 | by rrebenstorfSee all my reviews

The term, parallax, has everything to do with seeing, and as such it is particularly fitting for a film that is about seeing on many levels. Gordon Willis' distinctive cinematography is a perfect match for just such an enterprise. His commanding use of light, shapes, and (most of all) darkness creates a sense of uncertainty that flavors this so-called paranoid thriller. Along with under-sung director Alan J. Pakula, Willis is working here with pretty much the same production team that would next give us _All the President's Men_, but they do as well in this earlier film with apparently a lot less. Contrast the newsroom as shown here with the detailed recreation of The Washington Post in ATPM. It seems like Hume Cronyn and Warren Beatty are the whole newspaper in _The Parallax View_. That's fine. It's supposed to be two-bit paper.

We are shown eyewitnesses who don't know what they thought they saw during an assassination attempt. We don't know what we thought we saw either. We are shown conspirators who are constantly seeing around the next corner. We are kept guessing as well. We follow Warren Beatty nervously as he tries to keep ahead of this game. Kenneth Mars even gives Beatty a second false identity just in case the first one is checked. Finally, we take a slide-show psychological exam right along with Beatty, and perhaps we wonder what our own responses to it show us to be. It's a very special film that allows us to trust the filmmakers even though we know they may be giving us unreliable information. That blind trust seems to be the soul of this truly great movie.

Finally, I'd like to cast a vote for Mr. Beatty as one of our true American acting treasures. Where would the great films of the 70s be without his hip, wise-cracking presence? Did we expect Elliott Gould to do all the work?


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 June 1974 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Parallax View See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,942
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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