7.6/10
14,578
68 user 64 critic

Lenny (1974)

The story of acerbic 1960s comic Lenny Bruce, whose groundbreaking, no-holds-barred style and social commentary was often deemed by the Establishment as too obscene for the public.

Director:

Bob Fosse

Writers:

Julian Barry (play), Julian Barry (screenplay)
Nominated for 6 Oscars. Another 7 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Dustin Hoffman ... Lenny Bruce
Valerie Perrine ... Honey Bruce
Jan Miner ... Sally Marr
Stanley Beck Stanley Beck ... Artie Silver
Frankie Man Frankie Man ... Baltimore Comic
Rashel Novikoff Rashel Novikoff ... Aunt Mema
Gary Morton ... Sherman Hart
Guy Rennie Guy Rennie ... Jack Goldstein
Michele Yonge Michele Yonge ... Nurse
Kathryn Witt Kathryn Witt ... Girl (as Kathie Witt)
Monroe Myers Monroe Myers ... Hawaiin Judge
John DiSanti ... John Santi
Mickey Gatlin Mickey Gatlin ... San Francisco Policeman
Martin Begley Martin Begley ... San Francisco Judge
Mark Harris Mark Harris ... Defense Attorney
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Storyline

Interview-style biography of controversial and pioneering stand-up comedian Lenny Bruce. The film traces Bruce from his beginnings as a Catskills comic to his later underground popularity based on his anti-establishment politics and his scatological humor. Written by Scott Renshaw <as.idc@forsythe.stanford.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Lenny Said It. "Hot Honey" Did It. Together They Shocked America. See more »

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Lenny picks up food at the Chinese restaurant, the proprietor inquires about his "wonderful wife." Lenny replies, "We're divorced." He responds, "You're better off." Lenny used this as a joke in his standup routine. See more »

Goofs

During the movie's opening monologue, Lenny says that it's 1964 and then references the MDA Telethon, which debuted in 1966. See more »

Quotes

Lenny Bruce: Deny it. Flat out - deny it! If you really love your wife, deny it. If they got pictures, deny it.
Honey Bruce: lt bugged me at first. You know, it, it hurt.
Lenny Bruce: If they walk in on you, deny it. Just say this strange chick came into the apartment shivering with a sign around her neck that said, ''l have malaria. Lie on top of me and keep me physically active or l'll die.''
Honey Bruce: Later, l found out a lot about why he did things like that.
Lenny Bruce: And chances are, man... they'll believe it. Do you know why?
The Interviewer: To prove himself.
Honey Bruce: Needed ...
[...]
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Going the Distance: Remembering 'Marathon Man' (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

Tempus Fugit
Music by Bud Powell
Performed by Miles Davis
See more »

User Reviews

 
Hoffman is stunning
7 July 2005 | by LupercaliSee all my reviews

To be honest I don't think the rest of the film quite deserves 8 stars, but Dustin Hoffman's performance as Lenny Bruce is so extraordinary that it lifts the movie up to that rating.

Made in a fairly familiar quasi-documentary style, 'Lenny' begins with 'present day' (i.e. 1974) interviews with the surviving characters from Lenny's life, cut with flashbacks to his 1950's beginnings as a 'traditional' comic, and 'late' live performances in his post-drug-bust days. As the film progresses and the narrative catches up with the interviews, the gaps between these segments 'close'. Clever use is made of some of Lenny's material, cutting from keywords or phrases in his bits, to events in his life with inspired or correlated to them.

All the same there is something a little dry and disappointing in the film's structure: almost as if it could have used a more conventional, linear narrative, like Milos Forman's tribute to Andy Kauffman, 'Man on the Moon' would use to such great effect 25 years later.

Ironically though, such a structure might have deprived of us of seeing more of Hoffman doing Lenny's bits 'live' on stage - and for me these were the highlights, which I wish had lasted longer, rather than flashing back to some past event after 30 seconds. As a big Lenny Bruce fan, I can only say that Hoffman's portrayal is almost supernatural. It's like he's channeling the guy. He has his mannerisms and improvisational style down perfectly. You would swear you were seeing these improvisations for the first time if you hadn't heard them already. In fact, Hoffman possibly even improves on Lenny's delivery in one small respect. Lenny had a penchant for the 'conversation' that would erupt in the middle of one of his bits, between two or more characters. Hoffman probably puts a bit more distinction between the characters than Lenny often did (quite often they would all just sound like Lenny, which was part of the magic, but never mind.) Over 30 years on, it's quite amazing to me that this film has become a relative obscurity in Dustin Hoffman's filmography. Frankly, though Hoffman has blown me away on various occasions, I don't ever remember being more blown away than this. And if you were to pick easy people to imitate, I doubt Lenny Bruce on stage would be high on many people's lists.

The film as a whole is good, but to witness Hoffman channeling Bruce, it's a must-see.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 February 1975 (Canada) See more »

Also Known As:

Lenny See more »

Filming Locations:

Miami Beach, Florida, USA

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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