Italianamerican (1974) - News Poster

News

Mardik Martin, Screenwriter of ‘Raging Bull,’ ‘Mean Streets,’ Dies at 82

  • Variety
Mardik Martin, Screenwriter of ‘Raging Bull,’ ‘Mean Streets,’ Dies at 82
Screenwriter Mardik Martin, a frequent collaborator with Martin Scorsese on films including “Raging Bull,” “Mean Streets” and “New York, New York,” died Wednesday in Los Angeles at 82.

Born in Iran to an Armenian family and raised in Iraq, where he worked for a film distributor as a teenager, Martin moved to the U.S. to study economics at NYU, then gravitated to the film department, where he met Scorsese in 1961. Soon after, he began working with the director on some of his early films such as the 1964 short “It’s Not Just You, Murray,” then on Scorsese’s feature debut, “Who’s That Knocking at My Door?” and documentary “Italianamerican.”

Screenwriter Howard Rodman was among those who recalled his career.

My friend and colleague Mardik Martin died this morning. You may know him for his writing in Mean Streets, Raging Bull, New York New York.

To say that Mardik was
See full article at Variety »

Why 1974 was the best year in film history

  • Hitfix
Why 1974 was the best year in film history
All week long our writers will debate: Which was the greatest film year of the past half century.  Click here for a complete list of our essays. I was one of the first to select years for this particular exercise, which probably allowed me to select the correct year. The answer is, of course, 1974 and all other answers are wrong. No matter what your criteria happens to be, 1974 is going to come out on top. Again, this is not ambiguous or open to debate. We have to start, of course, with the best of the best. "Chinatown" is one of the greatest movies ever made. You can't structure a thriller better than Robert Towne and Roman Polanski do, nor shoot a Los Angeles movie better than John Alonzo has done. Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway give the best performances of their careers, which is no small achievement. If you ask
See full article at Hitfix »

Daily | kogonada, Rohmer, Glazer

Filmmaker editor Scott Macaulay interviews kogonada, "the somewhat mysterious, Nashville-based film essayist whose works have scored hundreds of thousands of views on Vimeo and other platforms." Among his subjects: Robert Bresson and Stanley Kubrick. Tonight, he'll be presenting work on Steven Soderbergh and Yasujiro Ozu. Also in today's news roundup: James Lattimer on Eric Rohmer's Love in the Afternoon and Jonathan Glazer's Under the Skin, Jeff Reichert on Martin Scorsese's Italianamerican, Ron Rosenbaum on Al Pacino and more. Plus remembering George Sluizer (The Vanishing) and German screenwriter Wolfgang Held. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Daily | kogonada, Rohmer, Glazer

Filmmaker editor Scott Macaulay interviews kogonada, "the somewhat mysterious, Nashville-based film essayist whose works have scored hundreds of thousands of views on Vimeo and other platforms." Among his subjects: Robert Bresson and Stanley Kubrick. Tonight, he'll be presenting work on Steven Soderbergh and Yasujiro Ozu. Also in today's news roundup: James Lattimer on Eric Rohmer's Love in the Afternoon and Jonathan Glazer's Under the Skin, Jeff Reichert on Martin Scorsese's Italianamerican, Ron Rosenbaum on Al Pacino and more. Plus remembering George Sluizer (The Vanishing) and German screenwriter Wolfgang Held. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

BBC arts doc fest confirms lineup

  • ScreenDaily
BBC arts doc fest confirms lineup
The BBC has confirmed the lineup for its new documentary festival Art Screen, which runs in Glasgow April 10-13.

The festival kicks off with Julien Temple’s Rio, with the director also participating in a Q&A with Kirsty Wark.

Martin Scorsese has specially selected Italianamerican for Art Screen audiences, exclusively from his own personal archive.

Jarvis Cocker will also attend a Q&A following the screening of steelworks project The Big Melt, which he co-directed with Martin Wallace.

Other screenings include Jeremy Deller’s The Bruce Lacey Experience, Kim Longinotto’s Salma, and a world premiere of Louise Lockwood’s Facing Up To Mackintosh.

Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard will give a masterclass about making their Nick Cave film, 20,000 Days on Earth.

Art Screen is led by the BBC with collaborators including Glasgow International, British Council, frieze, Lux, Glasgow Film, Cca and BFI. It is supported by Creative Scotland.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

BBC's new Glasgow doc fest confirms lineup

  • ScreenDaily
BBC's new Glasgow doc fest confirms lineup
The BBC has confirmed the lineup for its new documentary festival Art Screen, which runs in Glasgow April 10-13.

The festival kicks off with Julien Temple’s Rio, with the director also participating in a Q&A with Kirsty Wark.

Martin Scorsese has specially selected Italianamerican for Art Screen audiences, exclusively from his own personal archive.

Jarvis Cocker will also attend a Q&A following the screening of steelworks project The Big Melt, which he co-directed with Martin Wallace.

Other screenings include Jeremy Deller’s The Bruce Lacey Experience, Kim Longinotto’s Salma, and a world premiere of Louise Lockwood’s Facing Up To Mackintosh. Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard will give a masterclass about making their Nick Cave film 20,000 Days on Earth.

Art Screen is led by the BBC with collaborators including Glasgow International, British Council, frieze, Lux, Glasgow Film, Cca and BFI. It is supported by Creative Scotland.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Martin Scorsese Working on British Cinema Documentary

  • The Film Stage
I’ll go out on a limb here and say that anybody reading these words is at least tangentially familiar with Martin Scorsese‘s narrative output. I will, however, also assume that quite a few people have limited themselves to his features — and if I’m correct, they’ve missed out on entertaining, enlightening windows into everyday life (American Boy, Italianamerican), the world of music (The Last Waltz, No Direction Home, Living in the Material World), and film history (A Personal Journey Through American Movies, My Voyage to Italy).

That lattermost category is especially pertinent at this very moment, since The Independent — who profiled a new book about the man, Scorsese on Scorsese — briefly mentioned that he and the book’s author, Personal Journey co-writer and co-director Michael Henry Wilson, are working on a “new doc about British cinema.” To say that Scorsese‘s no stranger to the topic is rather obvious.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Understanding Scorsese: A Martin Scorsese Profile (Part 1)

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of legendary American filmmaker Martin Scorsese in the first of a five part feature...

“Marty never gave me much trouble,” stated Charlie Scorsese of his famous filmmaking son. “Marty and his friends used to drink my liquor and fill empty bottles with water and Kayro syrup, but they were good boys. Marty was sickly, though, and couldn’t keep up with the other boys. That’s how the thing with the movies got started.” The elder Scorsese, who earned a living as a clothes presser in the New York City garment district, served as an early cinematic influence for the Academy Award-winning director. “Having asthma,” recalled Martin Scorsese, “I was often taken to movies because they didn’t know what else to do with me.” As for his lack of athletic prowess, Scorsese remarked, “On my block, people took games seriously. If a kid dropped
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film Love: Martin Scorsese: Portrait Films

Feb. 26

8:00 p.m.

Eyedrum

290 Mlk Jr. Drive Se, Suite 8

Atlanta, Ga 30312

Hosted by: Film Love

If you think you’ve seen everything ever directed by Martin Scorsese, then you might want to head out to this special screening of two obscure documentaries the director made in the 1970s: Italianamerican and American Boy: A Profile of Steven Prince. These films are currently unavailable on video and extremely hard to see.

Italianamerican (1974) has been described by Scorsese as “the best film I ever made.” It’s a documentary portrait of his parents, Charles and Catherine, both of whom have had numerous cameos in their son’s more famous films. The documentary is both an intimate look at the Scorsese family and a commentary on the immigrant experience in America.

(On a personal note, I remember seeing Italianamerican way back in film school about 20 years ago, and while much of the film
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Martin Scorsese To Be Honored at 2010 Golden Globes with Cecil B. DeMille Award

Martin Scorsese To Be Honored at 2010 Golden Globes with Cecil B. DeMille Award
In January, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) will bestow the Honorary Cecile B. DeMille Award to Martin Scorsese for “his outstanding contribution to the entertainment field,” to which we say “Congratulations, Mr. Scorsese.” Of course, any award honoring Scorsese’s career is well-earned by the prolific and influential director. His lengthy and diverse filmography naturally contains movies which flopped and received no support from film critics, but when you look at his hits, he has left an unforgettable stamp on not only American cinema, but on audiences the world over. That his work continues to improve and defy simple definition is an inspiration to aspiring filmmakers and a challenge to his peers. There’s only one complaint people have about the awards Scorsese receives: they’re overdue.

Hit the jump to read the full press release. The 67th Annual Golden Globes will air on January 17, 2010. Martin Scorsese’s next film,
See full article at Collider.com »

Martin Scorcese Honored with the Cecil B. DeMille Award

Martin Scorsese will be honored at The 67th Annual Golden Globe Awards on January 17 with the Cecil B. DeMille Award for his "outstanding contribution to the entertainment field." The award, voted by the Board of Directors of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, was announced by Vera Farmiga at a morning press conference. The show, hosted by Ricky Gervais, will be broadcast live coast to coast Sunday, January 17 on NBC (5 to 8 pm Pt, 8 to 11 pm Et) from The Beverly Hilton.

Scorsese received two Golden Globe Awards for "Best Director of a Motion Picture"; for The Departed and Gangs of New York. He received five additional Golden Globe nominations, including four as Best Director (Casino, Age of Innocence, Goodfellas and Raging Bull) and one for Best Screenplay for Raging Bull (with Nicolas Pileggi).

Recent Cecil B. DeMille winners include Steven Spielberg (2009), Warren Beatty (2007), Anthony Hopkins (2006), Robin Williams (2005) and Michael Douglas (2004).

Martin Scorsese
See full article at MovieWeb »

Raging Bulls and Rolling Stones

Shine A Light: The Long Haul Of Marty, Mick & "Keef"

An essay by Jon Zelazny

This article first appeared at EightMillionStories.com on April 18, 2008.

Martin Scorsese appears on-camera in the pre-concert scenes of Shine a Light, his only obvious personal touch to a concert film that’s generally indistinguishable from your average HBO special. Scorsese has made some wonderful documentaries over the years, and at this stage in his career, I look forward to his pet projects more than his Hollywood features, but when measured against gems like ItalianAmerican and The Last Waltz, or even the tutorial My Voyage to Italy, Shine a Light is easily the least impressive work of Scorsese’s non-fiction career… which isn’t to say it’s a boring movie, or somehow not worth the price of even an IMAX ticket, because The Rolling Stones are indisputably world-class entertainers, and don’t require any
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed