7.0/10
58
1 user 1 critic

I'm a Stranger Here Myself (1975)

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Directors: Danièle Huillet, Jean-Marie Straub
Stars: Adriano Aprà, Anne Brumagne, Ennio Lauricella
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

Drama based on Russian writer Fyodor Dostoevsky's homonymous novel about the proud Karamazov family in 1870s Russia.

Director: Richard Brooks
Stars: Yul Brynner, Maria Schell, Claire Bloom
Mystery | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

A mysterious blonde woman kills one of a psychiatrist's patients, and then goes after the high-class call girl who witnessed the murder.

Director: Brian De Palma
Stars: Michael Caine, Angie Dickinson, Nancy Allen
Johnny Guitar (1954)
Drama | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

After helping a wounded gang member, a strong-willed female saloon owner is wrongly suspected of murder and bank robbery by a lynch mob.

Director: Nicholas Ray
Stars: Joan Crawford, Sterling Hayden, Mercedes McCambridge
Cairo Station (1958)
Comedy | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Kinawi, a physically challenged peddler who makes his living selling newspapers in the central Cairo train station, is obsessed by Hannouma, an attractive young woman who sells drinks. ... See full summary »

Director: Youssef Chahine
Stars: Farid Shawqi, Hind Rostom, Youssef Chahine
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.3/10 X  

In sunny St. Tropez, a young sexpot loves one brother but marries the other.

Director: Roger Vadim
Stars: Brigitte Bardot, Curd Jürgens, Jean-Louis Trintignant
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

Director Nicholas Ray is eager to complete a final film before his imminent death from cancer. Wim Wenders is working on his own film Hammett (1982) in Hollywood, but flies to New York to ... See full summary »

Directors: Nicholas Ray, Wim Wenders
Stars: Gerry Bamman, Ronee Blakley, Pierre Cottrell
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

An upper-class widow falls in love with a much younger, down-to-earth nurseryman, much to the disapproval of her children and criticism of her country club peers.

Director: Douglas Sirk
Stars: Jane Wyman, Rock Hudson, Agnes Moorehead
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6/10 X  

The most complete, newly restored version of Nicholas Ray's experimental masterpiece embodies the director's practice of film-making as a "communal way of life." Ray plays himself in the ... See full summary »

Director: Nicholas Ray
Stars: Richard Bock, Tom Farrell, Danny Fisher
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Chronicles the fortunes of two actresses in pre-revolutionary China, who are separated by money and politics.

Director: Jin Xie
Stars: Fang Xie, Yindi Cao, Nan Deng
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

Tom Ripley, who deals in forged art, suggests a picture framer he knows would make a good hit man.

Director: Wim Wenders
Stars: Dennis Hopper, Bruno Ganz, Lisa Kreuzer
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.2/10 X  

Follows a woman's fight and survival amid the vicissitudes of life and the cruelty of the society.

Director: Kenji Mizoguchi
Stars: Kinuyo Tanaka, Tsukie Matsuura, Ichirô Sugai
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
...
Herself
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
Leslie Levinson ...
Herself
...
Narrator (voice)
Edit

Storyline

Add Full Plot | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

independent film | See All (1) »

Genres:

Documentary

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 January 1975 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:


Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The scenes of Nick Ray directing scenes from "We Can't Go Home Again" were filmed at his rented farmhouse in Vestal, New York in March 1973, and at the Maxwell Anderson Theatre in New York City in January 1974. See more »

Connections

Features Johnny Guitar (1954) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Sad, often moving portrait of a fading genius.
16 May 2001 | by See all my reviews

This rarely seen documentary of legendary filmmaker Nicholas Ray, the mastermind behind seminal American films such as "Rebel Without a Cause" and "Johnny Guitar," centers around the director's work as a film professor in an upstate New York college.

Ray, rumpled, pale and sickly, but rarely seen here without a cigarette (or a fascinating anecdote) dangling from his lips, guides a group of students through what is perhaps best described as a "collective directing process."

Veteran actor Howard DaSilva narrates, reading analysis over clips of some of the most intense scenes of Ray's films, highlighting the fairly unique humanist nature of the director's oeuvre.

While at the time this documentary was made, Ray's collaborative work as a professor may have been laudable, and in keeping with the free-thinking, idealistic ethos of the early 70s (and, as we are told, something he may have been driven to by his disillusionment with the Hollywood system) but now the "process" shown here is as dated as a rusty VW Microbus, almost shockingly so, and certainly a little sad.

Ray is barely eking out (what we are told will be) a feature film with kids, who are handling all phases of the production. Shooting in the mud, darkness, and cold, with a shoestring budget, the sight of hippie "creative partners" fumbling with a line of trite dialogue, or arguing vehemently with Ray -- interspersed with clips of his work with some of the greatest stars (James Dean, Joan Crawford, Humphrey Bogart) in some of the most affecting films of the generation -- is jarring.

Director Francois Truffaut and actor John Houseman (as well as the clips) come to the rescue at intervals; they offer eloquent descriptions of Ray's powerful gifts, and, which despite the decidedly downward cast of his situation at the time of the documentary, are ultimately echoed by Ray's insight to his students and the crew that is following him.

While "I'm A Stranger Here Myself" (perhaps thankfully) almost completely avoids any close discussion of the problems that Ray faced neared the end of his life, whatever lack of concrete analysis exists is virtually obviated by the the intensity of Ray's physical and mental condition. All we really need to know comes through with almost the same pathos of Ray's earlier cinematic works. Nicholas Ray is suffering, dying perhaps, but isn't giving up.

While it can be argued that a man of his talents is deserving of a brighter cinematic eulogy, "Stranger," if you can find it, is not to be missed by fans of his work.


7 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See one user review »

Contribute to This Page

What Movies Do You Want to See This Summer?

Buzzing comedies such as Sorry to Bother You and The Spy Who Dumped Me await you in our Summer Movie Guide. Check in for the latest release dates and all the info you need.

See our Summer Movie Guide