5.8/10
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31 user 22 critic
A South African gold mine manager discovers a plot hatched by the mine owners and London bankers to flood the mine in order to curb gold production and consequently manipulate its price on the stock markets.

Director:

Peter R. Hunt (as Peter Hunt)

Writers:

Wilbur Smith (screenplay), Stanley Price (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Roger Moore ... Rod Slater
Susannah York ... Terry Steyner
Ray Milland ... Hurry H. 'Pops' Hirschfeld
Bradford Dillman ... Manfred Steyner
John Gielgud ... Farrell
Tony Beckley ... Stephen Marais
Simon Sabela Simon Sabela ... Big King (John Nkulu)
Marc Smith ... Tex Kiernan
John Hussey ... Plummer
Bernard Horsfall ... Dave Kowalski
Bill Brewer Bill Brewer ... Aristide
Norman Coombes ... Frank Lemmer
George Jackson George Jackson ... Gus, Mine Doctor
Ken Hare Ken Hare ... Jackson
Ralph Loubser Ralph Loubser ... Mine Captain
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Storyline

Rod Slater is the newly appointed General Manager of the Sonderditch gold mine, but he stumbles across an ingenious plot to flood the mine, by drilling into an underground lake, so the unscrupulous owners to make a killing in the international gold market. Written by mike.wilson6@btinternet.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Everything they touch turns to pure excitement! See more »


Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of four Africa set and shot movies in which Sir Roger Moore starred during the 1970s. The others being The Wild Geese (1978), Shout at the Devil (1976), and The Spy Who Loved Me (1977). See more »

Goofs

Once the news comes through that the mine is safe, the two villains watching get into a cat and mouse situation, with one attempting to run the other down using their Rolls-Royce. This culminates with the man on foot throwing a rock at and hitting the windscreen, causing the driver to lose control. But the shot from the throwers' point-of-view of the approaching car (his last sight) shows the windscreen undamaged. See more »

Quotes

[having knocked Kowalski cold]
Rod Slater: Kowalski! Kowalski!
[slaps him]
Rod Slater: KOWALSKI! The next time you touch a face darker than mine, you're out!
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Alternate Versions

Two versions of the opening credits exists. The first half of the credits feature the word GOLD in huge chunky letters on a black background. Within the letters, film has been optically added, showing gold being mined, processed, made into bars and finally, as a selection of jewellery. In the rough cut version, the final shot shows a woman's hand gliding into frame and selecting one of the pieces of jewellery. In the correct version, this is replaced by a slow zoom away from jewellery on a black velvet display. The rough cut also has Giulgud, Milland and Dillman billed at the same time, whereas the correct version has each actor billed separately. ITV in the UK always show the 'hand' version of the credits, although the DVD features the other version. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Bond. Classic Bond. (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

GOD REST YE MERRY, GENTLEMEN
(uncredited)
Traditional
Arranged by Elmer Bernstein
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User Reviews

A gripping and very entertaining mining thriller.
4 December 1998 | by austin-18See all my reviews

Gold is a superb adaptation of Wilbur Smith's novel. The plot concerns a group of greed-driven businessmen conspiring to flood a South African gold mine.

Roger Moore is terrific as our mine manager hero (and unknowing pawn) and he shares an entertaining chemistry with co-star, Susannah York. Bradford Dillman also impresses in his role as one of the more conflicted of the conspirators. With Ray Milland, Sir John Gielgud and Simon Sabela supporting, it's a great cast all round.

Director Peter Hunt (On Her Majesty's Secret Service) ensures that the audience feels the ominous, claustrophobic atmosphere of the mine, and he doesn't shy away from showing the impact of a flood in such surroundings. Along with Hunt, many James Bond veterans worked on Gold, and this shows particularly in how smoothly the location work in South Africa has been integrated with the soundstage work at Pinewood.

Composer Elmer Bernstein uses Jimmy Helms' title song as an orchestral theme to stirring effect, while Maurice Binder (another Bond veteran) gets the ball rolling with his uniquely designed opening credits.

Gold comes highly recommended!


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 October 1974 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Great Gold Conspiracy See more »

Filming Locations:

USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

GBP1,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (DVD)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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