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Academy Brings Architect Renzo Piano to N.Y. to Tout Movie Museum Plans

Academy Brings Architect Renzo Piano to N.Y. to Tout Movie Museum Plans
Ninety years after Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford first floated the idea of creating a museum for the movie business, the completion of Hollywood’s first major movie museum is finally nearing. Architect Renzo Piano and officials from the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences traveled to Manhattan Monday to preview the project for East Coast press.

After fits and starts, funding headaches and clashing visions, the 300,000-square-foot Academy Museum will open in mid-2019. Its backers, AMPAS, better known as the group that hands the Oscars, promise that the museum will be an immersive experience that will feature everything from screenings to talks to props and items from iconic movies.

“It’s much more than a museum,” said Academy Museum director Kerry Brougher at the Plaza Hotel. “It’s a hub for film lovers…to come and experience film in different ways.”

The museum will cost in excess of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

18 Shocks and Surprises From the 2018 Cannes Lineup, From Spike Lee to Jafar Panahi — and No Terry Gilliam

Love it or hate it, the Cannes Film Festival exists in a class of its own, and the newly announced 2018 program is no exception. The 10-day event on the cusp of the French Riviera finds thousands of people from the international film community crowding into a small strip of land known as the Croisette, where revered auteurs compete for attention in the majestic Palais des Festivals, while photographers crowd the red carpet alongside an ocean of tuxedos and sparkling gowns. The lavish display often obscures the actual quality of the movies, but Cannes always has a wide range of options. Artistic director Thierry Fremaux and his covert team of programmers are notorious for screening films up until the very last moment, even late into the night before the announcement of the Official Selection.

This year’s program, revealed this morning at an early press conference, reflects that frenzied process. While many familiar names stand out,
See full article at Indiewire »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]
Like the other acting winners of the 1980s, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor went to big stars and character actors alike. The ’80s featured big-name winners like Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Sean Connery and Michael Caine alongside hardworking veterans like John Gielgud, Louis Gossett Jr. and Don Ameche. The Academy also rewarded emerging talent, like Timothy Hutton, Haing S. Ngor and the now double-champ Denzel Washington.

So who is your favorite Best Supporting Actor winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Timothy Hutton, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Hutton came out of the gate strong with his heartbreaking performance in Best Picture winner “Ordinary People.” Hutton plays Conrad Jarrett, a teenager wracked with guilt after his brother is killed in a boating accident. Hutton is clearly the lead of the film, but at age 20, the studio may have felt it fairer
See full article at Gold Derby »

First Wacky Trailer for David Robert Mitchell's 'Under the Silver Lake'

"You're living in a carnival, hoping to win a prize. What are you going to win?" A24 has debuted the first official trailer for the new film from It Follows director David Robert Mitchell, titled Under the Silver Lake, a reference to the trendy Silver Lake neighborhood in Los Angeles. Andrew Garfield stars as a guy who falls for his neighbor one night, but wakes up to find she has suddenly disappeared. It's described as a "delirious neo-noir fever dream about one man's search for the truth behind the mysterious crimes, murders and disappearances in his East L.A. neighborhood." It's inspired by other noir classics like Kiss Me Deadly, The Long Goodbye, Chinatown, and Mulholland Dr. Also starring Riley Keough, Topher Grace, Callie Hernandez, and Jimmi Simpson. This looks totally nuts, but in a good way, so many wacky, wild things in this trailer. I don't even know what's going on?
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

China box office: 'Operation Red Sea' helps set new world record

China box office: 'Operation Red Sea' helps set new world record
February at the Chinese box office was the biggest month ever for a single territory with $1.67bn.

Thanks to the New Year blockbusters, February at the Chinese box office was the biggest month ever for a single territory with $1.67bn.

Much of that came from three top festive titles, which continued to command the Chinese box office during Feb 26-Mar 4. Operation Red Sea succeeded in moving to the top, knocking Detective Chinatown 2 to second place, while Monster Hunt 2 remained in third.

Hong Kong director Dante Lam’s latest military film, which opened in fourth and climbed to second in its second week,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Gary Oldman Teases 'Darkest Hour' Sequel and a Winston Churchill Play

  • Movies.com
Many Oscar nominees for Best Picture have spawned sequels, including The Godfather, Star Wars, Chinatown and The Silence of the Lambs, but shockingly the idea hasn't occurred to Hollywood much in years. Besides the pre-planned trio of the Lord of the Rings movies and the plans for follow-ups to Avatar and Toy Story 3, the last one to get a sequel might be Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. So it's particularly interesting that at least three of this year's Best Picture contenders are being considered for part twos.  Call Me By Your Name has inspired sequel discussions since at least its Sundance premiere in early 2017, and director Luca Guadagnino has since acknowledged a script is in the works for a...
See full article at Movies.com »

Mel Gibson teams with Chinatown screenwriter for Dancing Bear

Deadline is reporting that Mel Gibson is teaming with legendary Chinatown screenwriter Robert Towne for Dancing Bear, a TV adaptation of James Crumley’s hardboiled crime novel.

Set in Montana, Dancing Bear follows Milo Dragovitch, a part time detective who becomes entangled with a cast of unsavory characters in a web of criminal conspiracies, blackmail, land grabs, grizzly bears, guns and drugs.

“It’s basically Chinatown set in a 7-11 in Montana in the ’70s with a whole lot of cocaine,” said Gibson, who will executive produce with Towne, as well as directing the pilot.

“I’m thrilled to be working with Mel, whom I’ve known for years,” added producer Mike Medavoy. “This is a project Robert Towne and I developed together back at TriStar, and I’m glad to see it finally find its medium in the television of today.”

Gibson last helmed Hacksaw Ridge, which saw him nominated for Best Director.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Morgan Freeman, Forest Whitaker in Talks to Join John Travolta’s ‘Poison Rose’

Morgan Freeman, Forest Whitaker in Talks to Join John Travolta’s ‘Poison Rose’
Morgan Freeman and Forest Whitaker are in talks to join John Travolta in the action-thriller “The Poison Rose.”

George Gallo will direct from a script he wrote with Richard Salvatore, based on Salvatore’s novel of the same name. Salvatore will produce through his March on Productions with Jeff Elliott (“Imperium”), Oscar Generale (“Speed Kills”), and David Ornston.

Christian Mercuri of Blue Box International, a division of Capstone Group, will be commencing sales at the European Film Market at the Berlin Film Festival. BondIt Media Capital and Sherborne Media Capital are providing financing for the picture.

Ella Bleu Travolta, John Travolta’s daughter, also stars in the film. She will portray the daughter of Travolta’s character, Carson Philips. The Travotlas last appeared together in the comedy feature “Old Dogs.”

Gallo, whose credits include “Midnight Run” and “Bad Boys,” recently wrapped the biopic “Bigger” for producers Steve Lee Jones and Scott Lastaiti.

“Poison Rose” is
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Tomb Of Ligeia (1964)

“The boundaries which divide life from death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say where the one ends and where the other begins?” This is a quote of course from Edgar Allan Poe’s short story The Premature Burial, but ends up in the end credits of The Tomb of Ligeia (1964), Roger Corman’s final film in his Poe cycle for Aip, an eerie and fitting conclusion to a beloved series. (And doesn’t starting with a poetic quote make me sound fancy?)

Released by Anglo-Amalgamated Film Industries in the UK in November with a January rollout stateside from Aip, The Tomb of Ligeia was the least profitable of Corman’s Poe films, and he felt they had run their course, despite good reviews. Far be it from me to argue with the King of the B’s, but as a wave goodbye to the works of Poe,
See full article at DailyDead »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1990s include some of the most legendary actors in film history, like Anthony Hopkins, Al Pacino, Tom Hanks and Jack Nicholson. We’ve also seen actors springboard off their victories to have fruitful careers in film, like Geoffrey Rush and Nicolas Cage. Now, two decades later, which do you consider the greatest Best Actor winner of the 1990s?

Refamiliarize yourself with the winners and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actor.)

Jeremy Irons, “Reversal of Fortune” (1990) — The ’90s began with Jeremy Irons being awarded for “Reverse of Fortune,” in which the actor plays Claus von Bulow, a man charged with attempted murder after his wife goes into diabetic shock. Despite a long career in film this remains Irons’ only nomination and win, though he has won two Emmys for voiceover work and another for his performance in 2005’s “Elizabeth I.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Roman Polanski and great artists’ flawed genius | Letters

W Stephen Gilbert writes that what unites most of the men currently accused of sexually ‘inappropriate behaviour’ is their work in progressive and socio-politically challenging films; while Jan Potworowski says that historical context may help us understand, but not excuse, Polanski’s behaviour

Hadley Freeman writes powerfully about Roman Polanski and the fluctuating attitudes to his admitted abuse of an underage girl 40 years ago (G2, 30 January). She alludes also to Harvey Weinstein and Woody Allen who, along with directors such as Bryan Singer, Oliver Stone and Lars Von Trier and actors including Kevin Spacey, Jeffrey Tambor and Dustin Hoffman, have been accused of, in the current phrase, “inappropriate behaviour”.

It concerns me that what seems to unite all these men is that they have done significant work in progressive and socio-politically challenging films. Were Will Hays of Hollywood’s repressive Hays Code alive today, he would have been delighted that
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Whatever happened to The Last Dragon?

Craig Lines Feb 7, 2018

The Last Dragon was quite a different martial arts film. We dig into its story, and what happened...

When I was a kid in the local video library, I worked my way through as many martial arts films as I could, renting literally anything that had a bare-chested dude in a fighting stance on the cover. One film that fit the description, but stood out as being very different, was The Last Dragon.

As the brainchild of Berry Gordy, the mastermind behind Motown Records, it mixes martial arts, music, supernatural adventure, Bruceploitation, comedy and dance to surprisingly dazzling effect. The soundtrack is a showcase of what Motown Records was about in the mid-80s (arguably a second golden age for them), and its lead single – Rhythm Of The Night by DeBarge – should be familiar to anyone who knows their pop classics. But, far from being a flimsy
See full article at Den of Geek »

Roman Polanski Doc Director Weighs in on Whether Academy Should Expel Oscar Winner (Video)

  • The Wrap
Roman Polanski Doc Director Weighs in on Whether Academy Should Expel Oscar Winner (Video)
Marina Zenovich, the director of the 2008 documentary “Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired,” says the court of public opinion should not decide if the “Chinatown” director is expelled from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences over the sexual abuse case that led him to flee the United States 40 years ago. “I think that the Academy should decide; I don’t think that Twitter should decide,” Zenovich told TheWrap’s CEO and Editor-in-Chief Sharon Waxman at the Sundance Film Festival. Zenovich is at Sundance for the premiere of her latest documentary, “Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind,” a look at the...
See full article at The Wrap »

NCIS: Los Angeles Season 1 Episode 17 Review: "Full Throttle"

If you're a car guy, or girl, last night's NCIS: Los Angeles was right up your alley. If you're not, fortunately, there was still plenty of lighter fare to keep you entertained.

As we talked about in our NCIS review earlier, sometimes it's best when the mystery only comprises a portion of the episode, allowing the characters to carry the rest.

This was certainly true Tuesday on NCIS: La, and hopefully is a sign of things to come. Check out our recap for the basic plot, then read our review of "Full Throttle" ...

The team investigates the death of James Rush, a young Naval officer killed when his car suddenly explodes in an apparent sabotage attempt during an illegal street race.

Racing To The Scene: Kensi and Callen are on the case.

However, we learn that the suspected rival was Rush’s girlfriend, who raced under a male persona. Suspicious,
See full article at TVfanatic »

Brothers Ron and Clint Howard Reflect on Their Late Father's Legacy in Heartfelt Obituary

Brothers Ron and Clint Howard Reflect on Their Late Father's Legacy in Heartfelt Obituary
Rance Howard died Nov. 25 at the age of 89. In a statement posted on Twitter, his son, director Ron Howard, announced his father’s death: “Clint & I have been blessed to be Rance Howard’s sons. Today he passed at 89,” Ron, 63, tweeted, referring to his brother Clint Howard, who is also an actor. “He stood especially tall 4 his ability to balance ambition w/great personal integrity. A depression-era farm boy, his passion for acting changed the course of our family history. We love & miss U Dad.” In the days following his passing, brothers Ron and Clint reflected on their father’s life in an obituary,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Ron and Clint Howard Remember Dad Rance’s ‘Enthusiasm, Dignity and Fearlessness’ (Guest Column)

Ron and Clint Howard Remember Dad Rance’s ‘Enthusiasm, Dignity and Fearlessness’ (Guest Column)
“Having Opie sass back to Andy might get a few laughs, but it’s like every other sitcom and it hurts the father/son relationship.”

Aaron Ruben, Sheldon Leonard, and Andy Griffith were surprised. Where did this 32-year-old father of child actor Ronny Howard find the nerve to chime in and pitch changes to their new CBS sitcom? Where did this guy come from?

Our Dad, Rance Howard, born Harold Beckenholdt (11-17-28), was an Oklahoma farm boy who caught the acting bug at age 12, performing in a Christmas pageant in the town’s one-room schoolhouse.

A brief stint at the University of Oklahoma was highlighted when he met his first wife, Jean, at a scene study class. They married in Kentucky while touring as actors in a children’s theater company and ultimately landed in New York. Dad’s big break came when he was cast as Lindstrom in the original Broadway hit “Mister Roberts.”

Dad
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rance Howard, Actor and Father of Ron Howard Dies at 89

Rance Howard, Actor and Father of Ron Howard Dies at 89
Actor Rance Howard, father of Ron and Clint Howard and a prolific actor in his own right, has died at the age of 89. Ron Howard broke the sad news to fans on social media late on Saturday. Howard started his career when he was 20-years old, as part of a touring theater company. He acted alongside Henry Fonda in the play Mister Roberts, playing the role of Lindstrom across the country for a year and a half. Earlier this month, his granddaughter, actress Bryce Dallas Howard, praised Howard at the Broken Memories premiere and said that she admired how he stuck to acting despite never really hitting it big.

Ron Howard took to Twitter to share the news of Rance Howard's death while also paying tribute to the late actor. Ron Howard shared that his father changed the course of the Howard family history when he started acting. Ron had this to say.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Rance Howard, Actor and Father of Ron Howard, Dies at 89

Rance Howard, Actor and Father of Ron Howard, Dies at 89
Rest in peace, Rance Howard.

The actor died on Saturday, his son, director Ron Howard, announced on Twitter. Rance, who is also dad to actor Clint Howard, was 89.

"Clint & I have been blessed to be Rance Howard’s sons. Today he passed at 89," Ron wrote. "He stood especially tall 4 his ability to balance ambition w/great personal integrity. A depression-era farm boy, his passion for acting changed the course of our family history. We love & miss U Dad."

Rance's acting career spanned more than six decades. After his first movie role in 1956's Frontier Woman, Rance appeared in films like An Eye for an Eye (1966), Chinatown (1974), How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000), A Beautiful Mind (2001) and Nebraska (2013).

He also acted in several of Ron's films, like Splash, Cocoon, Parenthood and Apollo 13, as well as Ron's feature film directorial debut, Grand Theft Auto. He also worked with his son in TV, on the sitcom
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Rance Howard, Ron Howard’s Father, Dies at 89

Rance Howard, Ron Howard’s Father, Dies at 89
Actor Rance Howard, father of director Ron Howard and Clint Howard, died on Saturday. He was 89.

Ron Howard announced his father’s passing on Twitter.

“Clint & I have been blessed to be Rance Howard’s sons,” he wrote. “Today he passed at 89. He stood especially tall [for] his ability to balance ambition [with] great personal integrity. A depression-era farm boy, his passion for acting changed the course of our family history. We love & miss U Dad.”

Clint & I have been blessed to be Rance Howard’s sons. Today he passed at 89. He stood especially tall 4 his ability to balance ambition w/great personal integrity. A depression-era farm boy, his passion for acting changed the course of our family history. We love & miss U Dad.

Ron Howard (@RealRonHoward) November 25, 2017

Howard appeared in several of Ron Howard’s movies, including “Apollo 13,” “A Beautiful Mind,” “Splash,” “Cocoon,” “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” “Parenthood” and Howard’s directorial debut, “Grand Theft Auto
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Diasporhahaha! How Fresh Off the Boat reshaped sitcom convention

With the critically acclaimed Us show now on in the UK, its creators explain how it is more a thank-you letter to immigrant parents than a traditional comedy

Set in 1995, and based loosely on the memoir of Viceland TV chef Eddie Huang, Fresh Off the Boat is about the fictionalised Huangs, a family of Taiwanese-Americans who move from Washington DC’s Chinatown to a mostly white neighbourhood in Orlando, Florida, so dad Louis can open a cowboy-themed steakhouse.

Related: Fresh Off The Boat shows Hollywood there's life beyond yellowface

Related: 'Daca dramas': how immigration became Us TV's new obsession

Related: Fresh Off the Boat: a new perspective on race – with laughs

Related: Margaret Cho: ‘If Trump becomes president, the whole world’s in big trouble’

Related: Eddie Huang won't back down: 'I'm on TV because I tell the truth'

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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