7.7/10
124,881
434 user 101 critic

Blazing Saddles (1974)

Trailer
2:15 | Trailer
In order to ruin a western town, a corrupt politician appoints a black Sheriff, who promptly becomes his most formidable adversary.

Director:

Mel Brooks

Writers:

Mel Brooks (screenplay), Norman Steinberg (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
828 ( 186)
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 3 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Cleavon Little ... Bart
Gene Wilder ... Jim
Slim Pickens ... Taggart
Harvey Korman ... Hedley Lamarr
Madeline Kahn ... Lili Von Shtupp
Mel Brooks ... Governor Lepetomane / Indian Chief
Burton Gilliam ... Lyle
Alex Karras ... Mongo
David Huddleston ... Olson Johnson
Liam Dunn ... Rev. Johnson
John Hillerman ... Howard Johnson
George Furth ... Van Johnson
Jack Starrett ... Gabby Johnson (as Claude Ennis Starrett Jr.)
Carol Arthur ... Harriett Johnson
Richard Collier ... Dr. Sam Johnson
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Storyline

The Ultimate Western Spoof. A town where everyone seems to be named Johnson is in the way of the railroad. In order to grab their land, Hedley Lemar (Harvey Korman), a politically connected nasty person, sends in his henchmen to make the town unlivable. After the sheriff is killed, the town demands a new sheriff from the Governor (Mel Brooks). Hedley convinces him to send the town the first Black sheriff (Cleavon Little) in the west. Bart is a sophisticated urbanite who will have some difficulty winning over the townspeople. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Never give a saga an even break! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Western

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When auditioning for the role of Lili, Madeline Kahn was asked by Mel Brooks to pull up her skirt so he could see her legs. She was quite hesitant, being unclear of Brooks' intentions. Brooks actually just wanted to see if she had legs good enough to approximate Marlene Dietrich's famous "gams." So she lifted her skirt and said, "No touching." The Lili Von Shtupp character was a parody of Marlene Dietrich. See more »

Goofs

(at around 53 mins) No surprise that Lily is lip syncing, but it is really obvious as she emerges from behind the curtain. She is singing the word "hound", but her lips don't match that word. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Lyle: Come on, boys! The way you're lollygaggin' around here with them picks and them shovels, you'd think it was a hundert an' twenty degree. Can't be more than a hundert an' fourteen.
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Crazy Credits

Karl Lukas is credited (as Karl Lucas) in opening credits only. See more »

Alternate Versions

The standard cable and commercial broadcast versions omit racial slurs and some bad language. Extent of the editing is contingent on whether the TV-PG, or TV-14 version is being shown. See more »

Connections

Referenced in There's Something About Mary (1998) See more »

Soundtracks

Camptown Races
(uncredited)
Written by Stephen Foster
See more »

User Reviews

 
The Film That Made Brooks A Star
3 April 2006 | by ccthemovieman-1See all my reviews

Mel Brooks made several very popular and memorable films in the '70s but I doubt any was more popular than this one. Made just several years after the morals' code had been lifted in Hollywood, it was able to provide humor in a new and shocking way. People could fart, swear, have old ladies use the n- word, men could punch horses in the face, make fun of any religion, creed, race or whatever was there to make fun of ...in other words, no holds barred when it came to trying to get a laugh. Nothing was sacred at this time in Hollywood history and few capitalized on this as well as Brooks, especially with this film.

The film doesn't have much shock value anymore but it's still fun to watch and probably always will be, thanks to the outrageous characterizations in here.

On the negative side, especially if don't know Brooks does whatever he can to get a laugh and isn't all that political, this film might be too politically-correct with its reverse racism, bias against religion and overly crude situations.

But - a big but - there are so many funny lines in here, so many funny scenes you never forget and never fail to laugh no matter how many times you see it (the campfire scene alone has made men cry in laughter for 30 years) that you can overlook about anything in here.

In summary, a true "classic" guaranteed to entertain for many more years to come.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Yiddish | German

Release Date:

7 February 1974 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Black Bart See more »

Filming Locations:

Santa Clarita, California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,600,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$119,601,481

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$119,601,481
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono | Dolby (2016 Re-Release)| Mono (RCA Sound Recording)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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