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A Bigger Splash (1973)

Semi-fictionalized documentary biopic of British artist David Hockney. After a difficult break-up, Hockney is left unable to paint, much to the concern of his friends. The title was named after Hockney's pop-art painting 'A Bigger Splash'.

Director:

Jack Hazan
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1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
David Hockney ... Himself
Peter Schlesinger Peter Schlesinger ... Himself
Celia Birtwell Celia Birtwell ... Herself
Henry Geldzahler Henry Geldzahler ... Himself (Collector)
Mo McDermott Mo McDermott ... Himself (Friend)
Kasmin Kasmin ... Himself (Dealer)
Mike Sida Mike Sida ... Himself
Ossie Clark Ossie Clark ... Himself (Dress Designer)
Susan Brustman Susan Brustman ... Herself
Patrick Procktor Patrick Procktor ... Himself
Betty Freeman Betty Freeman ... Herself
Nick Wilder Nick Wilder ... Himself
Joe McDonald Joe McDonald ... Himself
Edward Kalinski Edward Kalinski ... Himself (as Eddie Kalinski)
Gregory Gregory ... Himself
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Storyline

When David Hockney's beautiful lover, Peter Schlesinger, breaks up with him, it leaves David a complete emotional wreck. An artist, he suddenly finds himself unable to create anything, and is awash in depression and loneliness. After a time, David is able to find inspiration in his backyard swimming pool, and he begins a portrait of it. This unique docudrama presents a semi-fictionalized account of the story behind one of Hockney's most popular paintings. Written by Polly_Kat

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Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 April 1975 (Netherlands) See more »

Filming Locations:

California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

£20,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Referenced in Cinemania (2002) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Some Insights into the Creative Process of David Hockney
7 August 2006 | by gradyharpSee all my reviews

Jack Hazan's quasi-documentary A BIGGER SPLASH is an unfocused examination about the creative life of David Hockney and supposedly about the effect of his past relationship with his pupil Peter Schlesinger (an artist, sculptor, and photographer who Hockney not only enjoyed as a lover but as a disciple). The précis appears to be that Hockney, in the throes of disappointment about the dissolution of his affair with Peter, decides to move to California where he has already been established as a painter of California people and places.

In London we meet his friends - Celia Birtwell, the elegantly stylishly beautiful model Hockney used repeatedly, dress designer Ossie Clark, confidant Mo McDermott, and patron Henry Geldzahler - each of whom Hockney painted and drew. We watch as Hockney visits the galleries and admires works of his friends, how he paints in his studio, how he relates to his gallerists (like Paul Kasmin), and how he perceives men and other artists.

Peter Schlesinger figures prominently in the film with many episodes of Peter's swimming in the pools of the people Hockney would eventually immortalize. He is a fine presence and carries his silent role well - almost appearing as a ghost muse that keeps Hockney focused on his now infamous swimming pool paintings.

The magic of this film, for those to whom Hockney is a well known and important painter, is the visual recreation of the paintings that have made him so famous: we are allowed to see Celia and her husband with white cat in context with the canvas, the view of Peter staring into the pool at an under water swimmer, the woman and her animal heads who appears in another of Hockney's famous paintings at poolside, etc. This kind of cinematic background is valuable now and will prove invaluable to the archives of David Hockney. For those people this is a must-see film, despite its meandering technique and choppy editing. For others, it may seem too self-indulgent.


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