A series of comedic and nostalgic vignettes set in a 1930s Italian coastal town.

Director:

Federico Fellini

Writers:

Federico Fellini (story), Tonino Guerra (story) | 2 more credits »
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Won 1 Oscar. Another 19 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Pupella Maggio ... Miranda
Armando Brancia ... Aurelio
Magali Noël ... Gradisca (as Magali' Noel)
Ciccio Ingrassia ... Teo
Nando Orfei Nando Orfei ... Patacca
Luigi Rossi Luigi Rossi ... Lawyer
Bruno Zanin ... Titta
Gianfilippo Carcano Gianfilippo Carcano ... Baravelli
Josiane Tanzilli ... La Volpina
Maria Antonietta Beluzzi ... Tobacconist
Giuseppe Ianigro Giuseppe Ianigro ... Grandpa
Ferruccio Brembilla Ferruccio Brembilla ... Fascist
Antonino Faà di Bruno Antonino Faà di Bruno ... Count (as Antonino Faa' Di Bruno)
Mauro Misul Mauro Misul ... Philosophy Professor
Ferdinando Villella Ferdinando Villella ... Prof. Fighetta
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Storyline

One year in a small northern Italian coastal town in the late 1930s is presented. The slightly off-kilter cast of characters are affected by time and location, the social mores dictated largely by Catholicism and the national fervor surrounding Il Duce aka Benito Mussolini and Fascism. The stories loosely center on a mid-teen named Titta and his household including his adolescent brother, his ever supportive mother who is always defending him against his father, his freeloading maternal Uncle Lallo, and his paternal grandfather who slyly has eyes and hands for the household maid. Other townsfolk include: Gradisca, the town beauty, who can probably have any man she wants, but generally has no one as most think she out of their league; Volpina, the prostitute; Giudizio, the historian; a blind accordionist; and an extremely buxom tobacconist. The several vignettes presented include: the town bonfire in celebration of spring; life at Titta's school with his classmates and teachers; ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The Fantastic World of Fellini! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Director Federico Fellini has denied that the movie is autobiographical, but agreed that there are similarities with his own childhood. See more »

Goofs

The banners promoting the Mille Miglia indicate that it was the seventh event (VII). However, the seventh running of the event was in 1933, and Beau Geste was not released until 1939. The Mille Miglia was not held in 1939. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Miranda: The puffballs.
Aurelio Biondi, Titta's Father: When the puffballs come, cold winter's almost gone.
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Alternate Versions

An exclusive digital restoration of the film was done by Criterion in 1995 for their laserdisc. The disc contains a before-and-after demonstration of the restoration process and has the option of either the original Italian soundtrack or the English-dubbed soundtrack. See more »

Connections

References The Thin Man (1934) See more »

Soundtracks

Stormy Weather
(uncredited)
Written by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler
This tune is heard several times during the film.
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User Reviews

 
Breathtaking images, Genuine laughter and Heartbreaking poignancy
25 December 2004 | by middleburgSee all my reviews

This film is a life journey. Filled with indelible images: The peacock in the middle of the snow, the awesome vision of the ocean liner--and the blind man crying out: "What's it like, what's it like?", the belly-laugh inducing introduction to each of the instructors at school, the beautiful people, the grotesques. Like life itself, the movie can be perplexing and enigmatic, sometimes magical, sometimes, in the face of the political climate and history, frightening as "simple people just trying to live get caught up in the times they were themselves creating". I don't think any film I've ever seen has so completely captured with such profound insight and simplicity the experience of losing a parent: The visit by the father and son in the hospital in which the mother realizes the awesome finality about to approach, and the son is blissfully unaware in his adolescent "immortality", and the total feeling of quiet and emptiness as the father sits at the dining room table, formerly filled with joyful, loud, noisy life--now emptier than could have ever been imagined before--this whole sequence comes as a powerful conclusion to a stunning film. With a final coda a la 8 1/2, Fellini embraces the audience, telling them not to worry--memories go on, life goes on, changed, altered forever perhaps, but it goes on, beautifully, enigmatically, magically.


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Details

Country:

Italy | France

Release Date:

19 September 1974 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Amarcord See more »

Filming Locations:

Mexico See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$432, 18 October 2009

Gross USA:

$125,493

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$196,609
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

F.C. Produzioni, PECF See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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