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20 Best Heady Sci-Fi Films: Part 1

  • Cinelinx
In honor of the 50th anniversary of 2001: A Space Odyssey, we make our picks for the best cerebral science fiction films of all time. Here are picks #20 - 11.

The job of science fiction is to push boundaries. Indeed, the very description of science fiction suggests going a bit further than established fact. Science fiction is supposed to build on the known world around us. It is supposed to explore the unknown. When science fiction is at its best, this exploration is being fueled by our own human condition. The reason we are exploring outward is because there is an uncertainty inside. We feel incomplete in some regard, and the answers might be out there.

Science fiction films that can best communicate the relationship between the universe and our own minds tend to be the films that leave a lasting impression. This is my pick for the 20 films that do the best job of this.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Rushes. New Fassbinder, "Stalin" Banned, De Havilland Sues

  • MUBI
Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.Recommended VIEWINGWe're very much in love with Zama, Lucrecia Martel's long-anticipated return to filmmaking. The new trailer calls us back to our encounter of the film at Toronto last year and our conversation with the director.We all know that Rainer Werner Fassbinder made a lot—a whole lot—of films in his all too brief 15 years of activity, but it's truly remarkable how new (old) work of his keeps appearing. First there was the revelation of World on a Wire (1973) and now another made-for-tv epic has been restored and is being re-released, Eight Hours Are Not a Day (1972-1973). We wonder what other future delights and provocations Rwf has in store for us!Recommended READINGDoll & EmAt The Guardian, Lili Loofbourow takes a look at how stories about women are perceived and received differently than those about men.
See full article at MUBI »

Planetarium | Review

Night of the Shooting Stars: Zlotowski’s Mysterious Glance at a World on a Wire

As one character observes to another upon a chance reunion in post-wwii France, the trouble with nostalgic memories regarding the ‘innocence’ good old days of the pre-War period is reconciling one’s lack of foresight with the tragedy to come—if only everyone had been able to relish those simpler times more fully.

Continue reading...
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The Furniture: Leering Through Querelle's Erotic Architecture

"The Furniture" is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

by Daniel Walber

The films of Rainer Werner Fassbinder, though they are many and varied, almost always have striking production design. The obvious examples include the ‘70s scifi chic of World on a Wire and the opulent apartment of Petra von Kant, but it's true of his whole catalogue. The design of Querelle is as bold as it is aroused. And as of this week it’s new to FilmStruck, a place where you can find tons of design classics (like La Ronde and Great Expectations, two of my favorites).

Querelle got terrible reviews when it opened in 1982. It’s often considered an oddity of excess at the end of a career built on precision, an oversexed and underwritten mess with little to say and too much to show.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Here’s Why Cinematographer Michael Ballhaus Was Brilliant: 13 Images That Capture His Style

Here’s Why Cinematographer Michael Ballhaus Was Brilliant: 13 Images That Capture His Style
The late cinematographer Michael Ballhaus didn’t grow up watching movies. His parents were stage actors, and he first fell in love with the art of performance. And as a cinematographer, one of his many gifts was the way he captures actors’ faces and how his camera found its rhythm with their movements and emotions.

Read More: Martin Scorsese Remembers His Cinematographer Michael Ballhaus: ‘He Changed My Way Of Thinking’

He fell in love with movies at age 20 when he visited the set of Max Ophuls’ “Lola Montes.” Ballhaus spent 10 days on the circus set and became entranced by the period style and the master director’s virtuoso swirling camera movement. Not until Ballhaus’ later Hollywood work, on films like “The Age of Innocence” or “Bram Stoker’s Dracula,” did he get the chance to work on lavish sets and play with all the toys of prestige filmmaking. Yet
See full article at Indiewire »

12 Movies to Watch After You See ‘Ghost in the Shell’

Check out these essentials even if you don’t catch the new movie.

Another week, another live-action remake of an animated classic. Well, you could argue that most of Ghost in the Shell isn’t really live action, since there’s so much that’s CG. You could also say it’s not a remake so much as a new adaptation of a Japanese comic book. Regardless, a lot of it is a pretty faithful copy, so a good percentage of this week’s list of Movies to Watch could apply to the manga or the anime versions of the story (I’m making it a given that you should see the original). That’s good for any of you boycotting the new movie due to its whitewashing controversy.

These 12 titles are worth seeing either way:

The Creation of the Humanoids (1962)

Despite being a cheap, cheesy sci-fi B movie, this is a significant work for being possibly
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Berlin: Fassbinder’s Restored TV Series ‘Day’ Dawns for New Audiences

Berlin: Fassbinder’s Restored TV Series ‘Day’ Dawns for New Audiences
The 60th Berlinale successfully premiered the restored version of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s three-part TV series “World on a Wire.” Now, seven years later, the Festival and the Rainer Werner Fassbinder Foundation offer a special presentation of the newly restored, 478-minute, five-part “Eight Hours Don’t Make a Day,” created in 1972 for Westdeutscher Rundfunk (Wdr) network. The series, Fassbinder’s first for television, and the last of his major works to be restored, “not only established a new genre for German television but also signaled a major new development in the career of a great contemporary filmmaker,” says Juliane Lorenz, president of the Fassbinder Foundation.

Tasked with creating a new type of family series about the life of the working class, the then-27-year-old Fassbinder did away with the conventional separation between private and professional life, achieving a seamless interconnection between domesticity and workplace activity. Lorenz notes, “Alongside themes common
See full article at Variety - Film News »

In the Age of ‘Lemonade’ and ‘Made In America,’ Should We Still Be Thinking of Film and TV As Different Media? — Critics Survey

  • Indiewire
In the Age of ‘Lemonade’ and ‘Made In America,’ Should We Still Be Thinking of Film and TV As Different Media? — Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question:

Recently, there has been a lot of chatter regarding projects like “O.J.: Made in America” (an eight-hour documentary that was produced by Espn but premiered at Sundance) and “Lemonade” (which needs no prior introduction, and debuted on HBO), and whether they should be classified as films or television shows.

The conversation has only grown more heated and urgent in the shadow of awards season, which demands that things be lumped into a small number of binary categories: Actor / Actress, Comedy / Drama, Fiction / Documentary, Film / Television. In a world where feature films are premiering on Netflix and miniseries-length documentaries are eligible for Oscars, should
See full article at Indiewire »

Criterion Close-Up – Episode 40 – The Science Fiction Episode

Mark and Aaron explore the popular genre that is science fiction. At the core of our discussion is a science fiction project that Aaron has been working on, but we also explore the genre on Criterion, and delve into Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s World on a Wire.

Episode Links & Notes

0:00 – Welcome and Intro

3:00 – The War Room, Thanks Keith

8:30 – Short Takes (Frau im Mond, The Fits, Captain America: Civil War, Robinson Crusoe on Mars, Mysterious Island, Stalker)

29:00 – The Sci-Fi List Project

50:30 – Sci-Fi Criterion Titles

57:00 – World on a Wire

CCU39: The War Room Wonders in the Dark CCU12: The Brood & Early Cronenberg Musical Notation: Metropolis Great Criterion Sci-Fi (Corby D.) Criterion Science Fiction (kafkaesque) Taste of Cinema: 15 Great Scientific Movies in the Criterion Collection Episode Credits Mark Hurne: Twitter | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

Next time on the
See full article at CriterionCast »

Criterion Close-Up – Episode 39 – The War Room & Politics in Film

Aaron is joined by Keith Enright for a discussion of politics, new and old, through the lens of The War Room (1993), the behind-the scenes 1992 Clinton campaign documentary. We go into depth about the backroom politics and how those are what defines the campaign, but are usually far from the public eye. We contrast the politics of today and yesterday by looking the current affairs and Robert Drew’s Primary.

About the film:

The 1992 presidential election was a triumph not only for Bill Clinton but also for the new breed of strategists who guided him to the White House—and changed the face of politics in the process. For this thrilling, behind-closed-doors account of that campaign, renowned cinema verité filmmakers Chris Hegedus and D. A. Pennebaker captured the brainstorming and bull sessions of Clinton’s crack team of consultants—especially James Carville and George Stephanopoulos, who became media stars in their
See full article at CriterionCast »

Movie Poster of the Week: “Androids Dream”

  • MUBI
Now playing exclusively on Mubi, Androids Dream is a piece of minimalist sci-fi filmed in an eerily empty, out-of-season Benidorm, on the eastern coast of Spain. Based very loosely on Philip K. Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (the source, of course, for Blade Runner), Ion de Sosa’s short feature conjures up a future world out of contemporary architecture in much the same way as Godard’s Alphaville and Fassbinder’s World on a Wire. The poster for the film was designed by David Uzquiza, a Spanish designer based in London who works primarily in fashion publications. As a friend of De Sosa’s he was asked to design the titles and the key art for the film, and he came up with a number of designs which you can see below. The final poster uses an illustration with an interesting provenance that appears within Androids Dream.
See full article at MUBI »

Criterion Picks On Fandor: Fassbinder

Each week, the fine folks at Fandor add a number of films to their Criterion Picks area, which will then be available to subscribers for the following twelve days. This week, the Criterion Picks focus on eight films from Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

Fall in love with a giant of New German Cinema with a selection of curated highlights from the prolific yet truncated career of iconoclast director Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

Don’t have a Fandor subscription? They offer a free trial membership.

Ali: Fear Eats the Soul

The wildly prolific German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder paid homage to his cinematic hero Douglas Sirk with this update of that filmmaker’s 1955 All That Heaven Allows. A lonely widow meets a much younger Arab worker in a bar during a rainstorm. They fall in love, to their own surprise, and to the outright shock of their families, colleagues, and drinking buddies. In Ali: Fear Eats The Soul,
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Old Gun

Robert Enrico's literally searing terror tale from the French occupation is not for the faint of heart. Fearing reprisals, surgeon Philippe Noiret sends his wife Romy Schneider out of harm's way of the retreating Germans -- but things go horribly wrong. What follows is an ordeal of vengeance even more brutal than Straw Dogs, fought to the finish in a medieval castle. The Old Gun MGM Limited Edition Collection DVD-r 1975 / Color / 1:78 enhanced widescreen / 102 87 min. / Le vieux fusil / Street Date September 8, 2015 / available through Screen Archives Entertainment / 19.95 Starring Philippe Noiret, Romy Schneider, Jean Bouise, Joachim Hansen, Robert Hoffmann, Karl Michael Vogler, Madeleine Ozeray, Caroline Bonhomme, Catherine Delaporte, Daniel Breton, Jean-Paul Cisife, Antoine Saint-John. Cinematography Étienne Becker Film Editor Ava Zora Original Music François de Roubaix Written by Robert Enrico, Pascal Jardin, Claude Veillot Produced by Pierre Caro Directed by Robert Enrico

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Some of us can remember
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Rainer Werner Fassbinder's Top 10 Favorite Films

Rainer Werner Fassbinder's Top 10 Favorite Films
A year before his tragic death in 1982, German director Rainer Werner Fassbinder — the cinema outlaw poet whose filmography included over 40 films and the epic TV mini-series "World on a Wire" and "Berlin Alexanderplatz" — put together a list of his top 10 favorite films. How did they influence him? Fassbinder's very favorite was Visconti's "The Damned," a visually sumptuous panorama of societal collapse and decay in Third Reich Germany and no doubt an influence on the German auteur's own "Brd Trilogy," in particular the bawdy, bordello-set "Lola." Watch: Watch: Rw Fassbinder's Early Godard-Inspired Short "A Little Chaos" In his early days, Fassbinder wore his influences like a beret, cribbing the style of early Godard films to make coolly composed black-and-white tales of chic Europeans and their nihilism. But then he found a style all his own: rich, character-driven psychodramas, meta-movie exercises and romantic...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

St. Petersburg Intl. Media Forum Launches

London — The St. Petersburg Intl. Media Forum launched Wednesday with a lineup of screenings spread across 10 programs, each curated by a leading Russian film critic.

Catherine Mtsitouridze, Spimf’s concept creator and general producer, said that the curators of programs had enjoyed complete freedom during the selection process.

“For the film selection for the Media Forum, it was essential to ensure 100% freedom of expression for the curators, our friends and like-minded fellows. Trust is the key success factor in our work,” she said.

The event opens with Xavier Dolan’s “Mommy” and closes with the world premiere of Susanne Bier’s “Serena,” which stars Jennifer Lawrence.

The Mamentum section features four films by French directors that appeared at Cannes: Olivier Assayas’ “Clouds of Sils Maria,” Francois Ozon’s “The New Girlfriend,” Bertrand Bonello’s “Saint Laurent” and Benoit Jacquot’s “Three Hearts.”

The section’s curator, Alexander Mamontov, commented: “Our
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gottfried John, ‘GoldenEye’ Villain, Fassbinder Actor, Dies at 72

Gottfried John, ‘GoldenEye’ Villain, Fassbinder Actor, Dies at 72
Gottfried John, who portrayed villainous Gen. Arkady Grigorovich Ourumov in the James Bond film “GoldenEye,” starring Pierce Brosnan, and was assocciated with German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder, has died near Munich, Germany. He was 72.

The actor also appeared in Taylor Hackford’s Meg Ryan-Russell Crowe vehicle “Proof of Life” (1999); the same year he appeared in “Asterix and Obelix vs. Caesar,” starring Christian Clavier and Gerard Depardieu.

He also guested on an episode of Lance Henricksen series “Millennium.”

John was among the stars of Fassbinder’s “Berlin Alexanderplatz” (1980) and “The Marriage of Maria Braun” (1979), and he also appeared in the director’s “Mother Kusters Goes to Heaven” (1975), “In a Year with 13 Moons” (1978) “Despair” (1978) and 1981’s “Lili Marleen,” in addition to Fassbinder’s TV work, 1972 miniseries “Eight Hours Are Not a Day,” 1973 miniseries “World on a Wire” and 1977’s “The Stationmaster’s Wife.”

The actor had most recently appeared
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gottfried John, ‘GoldenEye’ Villain, Fassbinder Actor, Dies at 72

Gottfried John, ‘GoldenEye’ Villain, Fassbinder Actor, Dies at 72
Gottfried John, who portrayed villainous Gen. Arkady Grigorovich Ourumov in the James Bond film “GoldenEye,” starring Pierce Brosnan, and was assocciated with German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder, has died near Munich, Germany. He was 72.

The actor also appeared in Taylor Hackford’s Meg Ryan-Russell Crowe vehicle “Proof of Life” (1999); the same year he appeared in “Asterix and Obelix vs. Caesar,” starring Christian Clavier and Gerard Depardieu.

He also guested on an episode of Lance Henricksen series “Millennium.”

John was among the stars of Fassbinder’s “Berlin Alexanderplatz” (1980) and “The Marriage of Maria Braun” (1979), and he also appeared in the director’s “Mother Kusters Goes to Heaven” (1975), “In a Year with 13 Moons” (1978) “Despair” (1978) and 1981’s “Lili Marleen,” in addition to Fassbinder’s TV work, 1972 miniseries “Eight Hours Are Not a Day,” 1973 miniseries “World on a Wire” and 1977’s “The Stationmaster’s Wife.”

The actor had most recently appeared
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Daily | Kusturica, Fassbinder, Cronenberg

Weekend update: Emir Kusturica pays tribute to the Bosnian-Serb radical who set in train a chain of events that led to the outbreak of World War I. Glenn Kenny considers Fassbinder's use of Fleetwood Mac's 1969 hit single "Albatross" in World on a Wire (1973). David Cronenberg's made a new short in conjunction with an exhibition in Amsterdam and his forthcoming novel. And much more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Daily | Kusturica, Fassbinder, Cronenberg

Weekend update: Emir Kusturica pays tribute to the Bosnian-Serb radical who set in train a chain of events that led to the outbreak of World War I. Glenn Kenny considers Fassbinder's use of Fleetwood Mac's 1969 hit single "Albatross" in World on a Wire (1973). David Cronenberg's made a new short in conjunction with an exhibition in Amsterdam and his forthcoming novel. And much more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Blu-ray Release: Ali: Fear Eats the Soul

Blu-ray Release Date: Sept. 30, 2014

Price: Blu-ray $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Brigitte Mira and El Hedi ben Salem star in Fassbinder's Ali: Fears Eats the Soul.

The wildly prolific German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder (World on a Wire) paid homage to his cinematic hero Douglas Sirk with the 1974 drama Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, an update of Sirk’s 1955 All That Heaven Allows.

A lonely widow (Brigitte Mira) meets a much younger Arab worker (El Hedi ben Salem) in a bar during a rainstorm. They fall in love, to their own surprise—and to the outright shock of their families, colleagues, and drinking buddies.

In the movie Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, Fassbinder expertly uses the emotional power of classic Hollywood melodrama to expose the racial tensions underlying contemporary German culture.

Criterion issued a DVD edition of Ali: Fear Eats the Soul back in 2003. This new Blu-ray version includes the following features, all
See full article at Disc Dish »
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