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Minneapolis Star Tribune Film Critic Out Over Plagiarism Breaches

A film critic for the Minneapolis Star Tribune has resigned from his post after editors discovered that he had plagiarized the work of other critics from as far back as 2009 and as recently as Nov. 1.

Colin Covert, who had been a staff writer with the paper for over 30 years, was found in an investigation to have used the unique language of other critics in his own movie reviews, Star Tribune editor Rene Sanchez and managing editor Suki Dardarian wrote in a statement.

Covert’s plagiarism came to the attention of the Star Tribune when a reader pointed out that the phrase “self-glorifying masochistic mush” was used in both Covert’s 2009 review of the musical “Nine” but also first appeared in a review from Pauline Kael in 1974. Editors then noticed that several other Kael expressions from her other reviews also appeared in Covert’s review of “Nine,” including “archaic big-musical circus,
See full article at The Wrap »

Unfinished Bernardo Bertolucci Film ‘The Echo Chamber’ Coming to Screens

  • The Wrap
Unfinished Bernardo Bertolucci Film ‘The Echo Chamber’ Coming to Screens
Bernardo Bertolucci’s “The Echo Chamber,” the final project the acclaimed director was worked on prior to his death last month, will be coming to the big screen.

Indigo Film, an Italian production company behind several Paolo Sorrentino films including “The Great Beauty” and “Youth,” is working to finish the film as a tribute to Bertolucci, one of Indigo Film’s founding partners Nicola Giuliano told TheWrap.

“The Echo Chamber” would’ve been Bertolucci’s first film as a director since 2012’s “Me and You.” No director has yet been selected to direct the picture in his stead. Bertolucci was wheelchair bound for much of the end of his life and died on Nov. 26 at age 77 after a short fight with cancer.

Also Read: Martin Scorsese Says Bernardo Bertolucci 'Inspired' and 'Opened Many Doors' for Him

Bertolucci wrote the first draft of the screenplay along with Ludovica Rampoldi, a writer for the Italian series “Gomorrah,
See full article at The Wrap »

Bernardo Bertolucci’s Last Project, ‘The Echo Chamber,’ to Be Brought to Big Screen

  • Variety
Bernardo Bertolucci’s Last Project, ‘The Echo Chamber,’ to Be Brought to Big Screen
“The Echo Chamber,” the unfinished project that Italian great Bernardo Bertolucci was working on before his unexpected death last month, is to be brought to the big screen by Italy’s Indigo Film.

Nicola Giuliano, a founding partner of Indigo (“The Great Beauty”), confirmed that the chamber piece would be produced as a tribute to Bertolucci’s artistic vitality. The project would have marked Bertolucci’s first time back in the director’s chair since his 2012 coming-of-age drama, “Me and You.” Giuliano said that a new helmer for the film had not yet been chosen.

Bertolucci, who died on Nov. 26 in Rome after a short bout with cancer, had completed a first draft of the screenplay, which he co-wrote with two young Italian writers: Ludovica Rampoldi, whose credits include hit series “Gomorrah,” and Ilaria Bernardini, a novelist who has worked on the Italian adaptation of “In Treatment.”

Very little is
See full article at Variety »

NPR CEO to Step Down in June

  • The Wrap
National Public Radio CEO Jarl Mohn will step down in June at the conclusion of his five-year term leading the company, NPR revealed in a press release Tuesday. Mohn plans to move on to the newly created position of “president emeritus” and lead NPR’s fundraising efforts in advance of the 50th anniversary of its launch in 2020.

In a note to staff, Mohn said that he and his wife plan to make a $10 million contribution to that effort themselves.

“My wife Pam and I are more committed than ever to helping NPR and public radio achieve long-term financial stability, particularly at a time when journalism is under economic and political pressures,” he said.

Also Read: NPR Fires David Edelstein Over 'Last Tango in Paris' Butter-Rape Joke

“We are so confident in the future of this organization that we are announcing our personal donation of $10 million to NPR as
See full article at The Wrap »

Remembering Stan Lee, William Goldman, Nicolas Roeg and More Reel-Important People We Lost in November

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Bernardo Bertolucci (1941-2018) - Filmmaker. He won two Oscars for writing and directing The Last Emperor, which also won Best Picture. He was also nominated for helming The Conformist and Last Tango in Paris. His other movies include The Dreamers, Stealing Beauty, 1900, Little Buddha, The Sheltering Sky and Before the Revolution. Early in his career, he served as assistant director for Pasolini's Accattone! He died on November 26. [THR] Dominique Blanchar (1927-2018) - Actress. She co-starred in...
See full article at Movies.com »

"He gave me a secret" by Anne-Katrin Titze

Catherine Breillat on a "little dialogue" she had with Marie-Hélène Breillat and Maria Schneider in Bernardo Bertolucci's Last Tango In Paris: "We found it ridiculous to say, but the beautiful choreography by Vittorio Storaro and the Louma, changed completely the sense of the scene." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Catherine Breillat upon reading the tributes for Bernardo Bertolucci by Saverio Costanzo, Richard Peña, Atom Egoyan, Don Rosenfeld, and Frédéric Boyer on Tuesday, sent the following to me this morning on the filmmaker, who directed Catherine and her sister Marie-Hélène Breillat in Last Tango In Paris and became a life-long friend. Bernardo Bertolucci died on Monday, November 26 in Rome at the age of 77.

Marie-Hélène Breillat and Catherine Breillat as dressmakers Monique and Mouchette in Last Tango In Paris

"I am also very pained by Bernardo Bertolucci's death. When I played for him this small character in Last Tango in Paris [dressmaker Mouchette], I
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

NPR Fires David Edelstein Over ‘Last Tango in Paris’ Butter-Rape Joke

  • The Wrap
NPR has fired film critic David Edelstein because of a joke he made after Bernardo Bertolucci’s death that alluded to a much-discussed rape scene in the director’s film “Last Tango in Paris.”

Edelstein, a critic for NPR’s “Fresh Air,” wrote on Facebook, “Even grief is better with butter,” along with an image of a scene in the film in which Marlon Brando’s character rapes Maria Schneider’s character using butter as a lubricant.

Edelstein, who is also a critic for New York Magazine, apologized after the post Tuesday, saying he did not know of Schneider’s widely reported comments in 2007 that the scene left her feeling “a little bit raped.”

Also Read: 'Last Tango in Paris' Director Calls Rape Outcry 'Ridiculous Misunderstanding'

NPR said in a statement that the joke was “offensive and unacceptable, especially given actress Maria Schneider’s experience during the filming of ‘Last Tango in Paris.
See full article at The Wrap »

NPR’s ‘Fresh Air’ Parts Ways With Film Critic David Edelstein After ‘Last Tango In Paris’ Rape Comment

  • Deadline
David Edelstein, a New York Magazine film critic and contributor to NPR’s Fresh Air, will no longer be a part of the radio show after he was criticized for insensitive comments made in the wake of Bernardo Bertolucci’s death earlier this week.

Edelstein said in a Facebook post Monday about the Italian director’s 1972 Last Tango In Paris that “Even grief is better with butter,” referring to a rape scene in the film featuring Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider. In 2007, Schneider told the Daily Mail that the scene was not in the original script, and she cried during the filming of the simulated act.

The Facebook post was deleted and Edelstein apologized via a statement from the magazine, saying he wasn’t aware of the scene’s backstory. But not before his comment was met with criticism and calls for his firing.

*warning: rape Jfc, David Edelstein. All
See full article at Deadline »

NPR’s ‘Fresh Air’ Fires Film Critic David Edelstein Over ‘Last Tango in Paris’ Rape Joke

  • Variety
NPR’s “Fresh Air” program has ended its association with David Edelstein following the film critic’s controversial joke about the “Last Tango in Paris” rape scene in the wake of director Bernardo Bertolucci’s death.

In a Facebook post, Edelstein posted an image of the rape scene with the caption, “Even grief is better with butter,” referencing Marlon Brando’s character use of butter as a lubricant. Many, including actress Martha Plimpton, demanded that Edelstein be fired.

“All day I’ve avoided noting [Bertolucci’s] death precisely because of this moment in which a sexual assault of an actress was intentionally captured on film. And this a–hole makes it into this joke,” Plimpton wrote.

*warning: rape Jfc, David Edelstein. All day I’ve avoided noting this mans death precisely because of this moment in which a sexual assault of an actress was intentionally captured on film. And this asshole makes it into this joke.
See full article at Variety »

Film Critic David Edelstein Fired by NPR Over ‘Last Tango in Paris’ Rape Joke

NPR’s “Fresh Air,” the iconic radio show hosted by Terry Gross, has announced it is cutting ties with film critic David Edelstein after the New York Magazine film critic made a joke while commenting on the death of esteemed filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci. Edelstein posted to his Facebook page a photo of Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider from Bertolucci’s erotic drama “Last Tango in Paris” with the caption: “Even grief is better with butter.”

Edelstein was referencing the infamous “Last Tango in Paris” scene in which butter is used as lubricant during a sex scene. Bertolucci acknowledged in December 2016 the scene was a surprise for the 19-year-old Schneider, who came forward to say she felt humiliated by the action. Many criticized Bertolucci’s actions on set as a form of rape, and Edelstein’s joke was slammed online for making light of a serious sexual assault.

“Today we learned
See full article at Indiewire »

Peter Travers on Bernardo Bertolucci: A Provocateur Whose Films Inspire Awe

Peter Travers on Bernardo Bertolucci: A Provocateur Whose Films Inspire Awe
The first time I met the rabblerousing Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci, he was searching for a word, rubbing two fingers together as if to spark a thought. “I think — how do I put it? — that the word is texture. You know, how a movie feels when you hold it in your head and run it through all your own life experience. So there’s depth to it. And politics. And sex. And, if you’re lucky, maybe magic.”

Bertolucci, who died on Monday at 77, spent his last few years with
See full article at Rolling Stone »

How Bernardo Bertolucci’s X-Rated ‘Last Tango in Paris’ Became a Blockbuster

  • Indiewire
How Bernardo Bertolucci’s X-Rated ‘Last Tango in Paris’ Became a Blockbuster
Bernardo Bertolucci leaves a cinematic legacy of great films, including “The Conformist” and “The Last Emperor,” which won nine Oscars including Best Picture and Director. However, his biggest hit would be inconceivable today. “Last Tango in Paris,” the X-rated drama starring Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider, made more in its 1973 domestic release than the year’s James Bond entry, “Live and Let Die.” It was the year’s number 7 film, with an adjusted gross of $186 million — just a little below what Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born” has amassed so far.

The mid-’70s were a high point for sophisticated, critic-influenced foreign films. Veteran directors like Bergman and Fellini remained significant players, while Francois Truffaut, Alain Resnais, and Claude Chabrol regularly found success. However, “Last Tango” was a sensation; even today, among foreign films it’s outstripped only by “La Dolce Vita” ($245 million) and “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” ($207 million
See full article at Indiewire »

Martin Scorsese Says Bernardo Bertolucci ‘Inspired’ and ‘Opened Many Doors’ for Him

  • The Wrap
Martin Scorsese Says Bernardo Bertolucci ‘Inspired’ and ‘Opened Many Doors’ for Him
Martin Scorsese says that Bernardo Bertolucci, the Italian director who passed away Monday, both “inspired” and “opened many doors” for him as a director.

In the wake of Bertolucci’s death, Scorsese said in a statement that he first saw Bertolucci’s 1964 film “Before the Revolution” in Italy and came out of the theater “in a daze, speechless.”

“I was truly stunned and moved by the level of sheer artistry and talent up there on the screen, I was shocked by the freedom of the picture, I was somewhat mystified by so many of the cultural references and cross-references, and, as someone who wanted to make films, I was inspired,” Scorsese said.

Also Read: Hollywood Remembers Bernardo Bertolucci as a 'Giant of Italian Filmmaking'

He also applauded Bertolucci’s “The Conformist,” “Last Tango in Paris,” “The Last Emperor” and “The Sheltering Sky” as films that had a profound influence on
See full article at The Wrap »

Martin Scorsese pays tribute to 'magical' Bernardo Bertolucci

Martin Scorsese pays tribute to 'magical' Bernardo Bertolucci
’When I think of Bertolucci – the man, the artist – the word that comes to mind is refinement.’

Martin Scorsese has paid tribute to Bernardo Bertolucci, who died earlier on Monday (26) aged 77.

Bertolucci’s publicist said on Monday that the great director behind such films as Last Tango In Paris and The Last Emperor died of cancer.

“In 1964, I went up to Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center for the 2nd New York Film Festival to see a new film from Italy. It was called Before the Revolution and it was by a young director named Bernardo Bertolucci,” said Scorsese. ”I
See full article at ScreenDaily »

From ‘Last Tango’ to ‘Last Emperor,’ Bertolucci Was the First and Last of His Kind

  • Variety
From ‘Last Tango’ to ‘Last Emperor,’ Bertolucci Was the First and Last of His Kind
The year 2018 is shaping up to be a tragedy of epic proportions for lovers of world cinema. In April, Czech director Milos Forman passed away, and now, in late November, within a matter of days, we have lost avant garde maestro Nicolas Roeg and that great Italian iconoclast Bernardo Bertolucci.

Consider: Forman’s “Amadeus,” Roeg’s identity-shattering “Performance” (co-directed with Donald Cammell), and Bertolucci’s still unsurpassed exploration of moral ambiguity and personal compromise, “The Conformist.” The medium is inconceivable in its present form without these films, whose directors were hardly one-hit wonders, contributing masterpiece after masterpiece during the most fertile stretches of their careers. Though each had struggled to maintain his relevance in recent decades, any late-life disappointment seems inevitable when judged relative to the achievements that came before.

Of the three, Bertolucci was by far the most successful at sustaining his impact until the end, for his brand was controversy,
See full article at Variety »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘The Last Emperor’ and ‘Last Tango in Paris,’ Dead at 77

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘The Last Emperor’ and ‘Last Tango in Paris,’ Dead at 77
Oscar-winning director Bernardo Bertolucci, best known for his nine-time Oscar-winning masterpiece The Last Emperor, has died at 77. The Italian auteur behind groundbreaking works like Last Tango in Paris and The Conformist passed away in Rome this weekend following a battle with cancer, according to his publicist (via Deadline). He is survived by his wife, British filmmaker Clare Peploe, […]

The post Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘The Last Emperor’ and ‘Last Tango in Paris,’ Dead at 77 appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Last Tango in Paris Director, Dies at 77

Bernardo Bertolucci, Last Tango in Paris Director, Dies at 77
Bernardo Bertolucci, the influential Italian director of Last Tango in Paris and The Last Emperor, has passed away at the age of 77. The news of Bertolucci's death was confirmed by his publicist. The filmmaker passed away in Rome following a battle with cancer.

During his five-decade career, working both in Europe and in Hollywood, Bernardo Bertolucci had a major influence on the movie world. The filmmaker got his start in the 1960s in Italian cinema with works such as La Commare Secca (The Grim Reaper), which served as his feature directorial debut. He would later go on to helm the political feature Before the Revolution (1964), before directing one of his most acclaimed works with 1970's The Conformist.

Born to a wealthy family in 1941, Bernardo Bertolucci was the son of Attilio Bertolucci, a well-regarded poet. After winning an award for poetry at the age of 21 himself, the younger Bertolucci decided that
See full article at MovieWeb »

Sex factor: Nicolas Roeg and Bernardo Bertolucci's transgressive legacy

Roeg and Bertolucci were among the first directors to use explicit eroticism to bring psychological depth to their films – a sensibility cast in a new light by #MeToo

The coincidence of two great film-makers dying in the space of three days would be striking enough. But Nicolas Roeg, the British cinematographer turned director who died on Friday aged 90, and Bernardo Bertolucci, whose death at the age of 77 was announced on Monday, had more in common than the time of their passing. Their reputations were forged at the forefront of a new kind of transgressive cinema in the 1960s and 70s, in which explicit depictions of sex and desire were a driving dramatic force, rather than X-rated window dressing. Sex in these films isn’t gratuitous titillation but a way of expressing character, motivation and meaning. Remove the beast with two backs from Roeg’s extraordinary early work – including Don’t Look Now,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-winning Director, Dead At Age 77

  • CinemaRetro
Bertolucci on location for "Last Tango in Paris" with Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider in 1972.

By Lee Pfeiffer

Bernardo Bertolucci, the acclaimed Italian director, has died in Rome at age 77. The cause of death was not immediately revealed. Bertolucci won an Oscar for his direction of the 1987 film "The Last Emperor" and also received acclaim for his earlier films that included "The Spider's Stratagem" and "The Conformist". A left-wing Marxist through much of his life, Bertolucci also directed the 1976 epic "1900" which was steeped in political overtones. His most famous and notorious film was "Last Tango in Paris" (1972), which was non-political but highly controversial. It's graphic sexual content was the cause of international controversy and resulted in Bertolucci being charged with obscenity in his native Italy. The film starred Marlon Brando in the tale of a depressed, middle-aged American ex-pat who indulges in a series of anonymous sexual encounters with a teenage Parisian girl (Maria Schneider.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Hollywood Remembers Bernardo Bertolucci as a ‘Giant of Italian Filmmaking’

  • The Wrap
Hollywood Remembers Bernardo Bertolucci as a ‘Giant of Italian Filmmaking’
Hollywood is paying their respects to Bernardo Bertolucci, the famed Italian art-house director who died Monday at age of 77 after battling cancer.

Filmmakers and critics celebrated his life’s work, which included films “Last Tango in Paris,” “The Last Emperor” and “The Conformist,” in tributes on Monday morning.

“Farewell to Bernardo Bertolucci, Honorary Palme at #Cannes2011 for his entire career after chairing the Jury in 1990,” the official account of the Cannes Film Festival tweeted. “A giant of Italian filmmaking, he will remain forever a leading light in world cinema.”

Also Read: Bernardo Bertolucci, 'Last Tango in Paris' Director, Dies at 77

Director Guillermo Del Toro took the time to rank his top three Bertolucci films, starting with “The Conformist,” followed by “1900” and “The Last Emperor.”

Bertolucci won the DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film for “The Last Emperor” and was also nominated in that category for “Last Tango in Paris.
See full article at The Wrap »
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