7.0/10
49,060
203 user 114 critic

Last Tango in Paris (1972)

Ultimo tango a Parigi (original title)
NC-17 | | Drama, Romance | 7 February 1973 (USA)
Trailer
1:31 | Trailer
A young Parisian woman meets a middle-aged American businessman who demands their clandestine relationship be based only on sex.

Writers:

Bernardo Bertolucci (story), Bernardo Bertolucci (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
2,746 ( 452)
Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 7 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Marlon Brando ... Paul
Maria Schneider ... Jeanne
Maria Michi ... Rosa's Mother / La mère de Rosa
Giovanna Galletti ... Prostitute / La prostituée
Gitt Magrini Gitt Magrini ... Jeanne's Mother / La mère de Jeanne
Catherine Allégret ... Catherine (as Catherine Allegret)
Luce Marquand Luce Marquand ... Olympia
Marie-Hélène Breillat Marie-Hélène Breillat ... Monique (as Marie-Helene Breillat)
Catherine Breillat ... Mouchette
Dan Diament Dan Diament ... TV Sound Engineer / L'ingénieur du son
Catherine Sola Catherine Sola ... TV Script Girl / La script-girl
Mauro Marchetti Mauro Marchetti ... TV Cameraman / Le cameraman
Jean-Pierre Léaud ... Tom - un cinéaste, le fiancé de Jeanne (as Jean-Pierre Leaud)
Massimo Girotti ... Marcel
Peter Schommer Peter Schommer ... TV Assistant Cameraman / L'assistant-opérateur
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Storyline

While looking for an apartment, Jeanne, a beautiful young Parisienne, encounters Paul, a mysterious American expatriate mourning his wife's recent suicide. Instantly drawn to each other, they have a stormy, passionate affair, in which they do not reveal their names to each other. Their relationship deeply affects their lives, as Paul struggles with his wife's death and Jeanne prepares to marry her fiance, Tom, a film director making a cinema-verite documentary about her. Written by Erich Schneider <erich@bush.cs.tamu.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

You will never see the most highly acclaimed film of our time on television. This may be your last chance to see it in a theater. (1975)

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated NC-17 for some explicit sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

An art lover, director Bernardo Bertolucci drew inspiration from the works of the British artist Francis Bacon for the opening sequence of cast and crew credits. See more »

Goofs

When Paul monologues with the Rosa, as he leans on her to say "Rosa, I'm sorry.", she blinks. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Paul: [with his hands over his ears at the overwhelming sound of a passing train] Fucking GOD!
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Alternate Versions

A scene in which Paul scares away a bible salesman from his apartment by getting on all fours and barking like a dog was in the film at its world premiere at the New York Film Festival. Although Pauline Kael, present at that screening, specifically praised the scene in her "New Yorker" review of the film, Bertolucci cut it out of the film before its general release. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Office: Pool Party (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Shenandoah
(uncredited)
Traditional
Performed by Marlon Brando
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User Reviews

 
Maria Schneider's face summarises this film perfectly
15 December 2005 | by haasxaarSee all my reviews

Schneider's looks can dutifully encapsulate my true emotions to this film. Occasionally she looks sexy and encaptivating, other times she can look too pale and a little bland. That's exactly how Bertolucci's helping of sexual cravings had me feeling after this film.

Habitually, Bertolucci's work eclipses genius - he is one of the few directors in world cinema that has an eye for definitive detail. He can capture such beautiful images, with such great vision, emotion, colour and panache that the viewer's sentiments are guided like few others in film-making. Like aforementioned, Schneider's face would be the perfect simile for this particular film. One scene the viewer is startled by the raw depth of the film, although slightly troubled by the explicit sex, but then all the viewer is treated to in the next scene is a terse and awkward moment which seems to have no correlation with the one that preceded it.

Naturally Brando's performance did help boost this film greatly, but that seems the film's very weakness - whenever he is off-camera it seems to struggle too much, it loses its power and prestige and becomes a little incoherent. This film undoubtedly has some powerful and poignant scenes that really can convey genuine sentiment and exude a tangible originality too; but it never really seems to shake off the loss of Brando's presence altogether.

For admirers of Bertolucci its a must, but for more neutral cineastes it would be advisable to have a more cautious approach when watching this film - to enjoy it, it would be paramount to expect this film to be an edifying, not an entertaining experience; its not a frivolous subject matter in any sense


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Details

Official Sites:

MGM

Country:

France | Italy

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

7 February 1973 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Last Tango in Paris See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,250,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$36,144,000

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$36,182,181
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (rough cut)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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