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Paul King interview: Paddington 2

Ben Mortimer Nov 6, 2017

Director Paul King on the box office failure of Bunny And The Bull through to the heights of the new Paddington 2...

Returning to the world of Paddington following the huge success of the first movie is co-writer and director Paul King. It's a magical film he's fashioned too, and he spared us some time to chat about it. Here's how that conversation went...

See related The Flash season 4 episode 4 review: Elongated Journey Into The Night The Flash season 4 episode 3 review: Luck Be A Lady

I interviewed you about eight years ago for Bunny And The Bull at the McM Comic Con...

And look how well that went.

How things have progressed...

There was no suite then, was there?

There wasn’t much of a view, either.

No. I think we pretty much had to hitch to get there.

Pleased with the progress?

It’s been very nice.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Arrow Video’s January Blu-ray Releases Include The Cat O’ Nine Tails, Re-animator, The Hills Have Eyes (1977)

  • DailyDead
The holidays may be over by the time January rolls around, but Arrow Video will still have gifts in store for horror fans with Blu-ray releases that include Dario Argento's The Cat O' Nine Tails, Stuart Gordon's Re-Animator, and Wes Craven's The Hills Have Eyes.

We have release details and images of Arrow Video's January Blu-ray releases below. The Cat O' Nine Tails is a limited edition item, and while Re-Animator and The Hills Have Eyes were previously released as limited editions by Arrow Video, they will be hitting shelves as re-releases in January (with slightly less goodies, but still plenty of bonus features and eye-popping 4K restorations to enjoy).

From Arrow Video: "New UK/Us Title: The Cat o’ Nine Tails (Dual Format Blu-ray + DVD) Limited Edition

Pre-order The Cat O’ Nine Tails in the UK: http://bit.ly/2i9y0cp

Pre-order The Cat
See full article at DailyDead »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Fly (1958)

“Charming” is not often a word associated with horror films; it’s counterintuitive to what the genre usually stands for—you know, terror and tension, followed by release and a sense of ease, then repeat—but yet here we are with a romantic tale about a boy, a girl, a teleportation device, and the insect that comes between them. Welcome to the world of The Fly (1958), where the hosts are welcoming, the police polite, and the monster bug-eyed.

Released by Twentieth Century Fox in July, The Fly pulled in $7 million against its $300,000 budget, enticing audiences with a tale often told at the time—sold as another Atomic Age Monster Mash, The Fly instead uses a much smaller (and human) canvas to convey a message of obsession and the love that ultimately ends it. Having said that, you also get a man with a fly head and some neat-o transportation sequences,
See full article at DailyDead »

Crypt of Curiosities: A Look Back at Universal’s Horror Films Featuring Rondo Hatton’s “The Creeper”

  • DailyDead
In the mid ’40s, the Universal Monsters were in a tough spot. Up until then, the ’40s had been a nonstop flow of sequels and one-offs, with an avalanche of Invisible Men, Draculas (Draculi?), and the odd Frozen Ghost here and there releasing at a steady clip. But this high release rate had made them stale, and by the time 1946 came around, the studio was in desperate need of a new, recognizable monster.

Enter Rondo Hatton. A journalist-turned-b-movie-bit-player, Hatton had been afflicted with acromegaly for most of his adult life, which enlarged his jaw and pronounced his forehead over the years. This distinctive appearance led to him being cast as nameless goons up until the ’40s, when he got his big, career-defining role as The Creeper.

Curiously, The Creeper’s first appearance wasn’t in a horror film at all. It was in The Pearl of Death (1944), one of the
See full article at DailyDead »

Full Details for Arrow Video’s August Horror Releases, Including Re-animator 4K Restoration Limited Edition Blu-ray

This August, Arrow Video enters the deranged mind of Herbert West with their limited edition 4K restoration of Stuart Gordon's Re-Animator (which was initially slated for a July 25th release), and we now have the full list of special features for the anticipated release, along with two other horror Blu-rays coming out this month from Arrow: The Slayer and a limited edition steelbook of Society.

Press Release: The summer really hots up in August, as Arrow Video releases a special edition of an 80s classic, a white-knuckle thriller, a splatter horror masterpiece, a box set of crime classics, a rare Italian sword-and-sandal epic, and an amazing new limited edition steelbook.

First up, one of the most wildly popular horror movies of all-time, Stuart Gordon's enduring splatter-comedy classic Re-Animator returns to Blu-ray in a stunning restoration packed with special features. According to the distributor (Mvd), this awesome package is officially sold out already,
See full article at DailyDead »

The Truth Is Here: Game of Thrones's Lady Olenna Looks So Different in Real Life

  • Popsugar
The Truth Is Here: Game of Thrones's Lady Olenna Looks So Different in Real Life
Game of Thrones probably broke your heart again when Lady Olenna willingly swallowed poison on Sunday night. While death wasn't obviously her choice, she took control of how she left the crazy world that is Westoros after everyone she loved was brutally murdered (she also delivered one hell of a truth bomb before she went). Despite her age, Olenna was one of the strongest and most badass female characters on the show, which was obvious during her recent chat with Daenerys Targaryen. "I've known a great many clever men," she said. "I've outlived them all. You know why? I ignored them." While we'll sadly miss Olenna on the small screen, we still have the actress who plays her to obsess over: Dame Diana Rigg. The 79-year-old English actress has been around for decades, and she was (and still is) a total babe. While it's a bit jarring to see Diana
See full article at Popsugar »

Diana Rigg: TV’s Sexiest Woman to Mrs. James Bond to ‘Game of Thrones’

Diana Rigg: TV’s Sexiest Woman to Mrs. James Bond to ‘Game of Thrones’
On July 16, “Game of Thrones,” the medieval fantasy for people who don’t normally like medieval fantasies, begins its seventh season on HBO. The battle scenes and the dragons are epic, but the series’ success is mostly due to the vivid characters created by George R.R. Martin and the actors.

Especially notable are the powerful women played by Emilia Clarke, Lena Headey — and Diana Rigg.

Rigg, whose birthday arrives a few days after the season premiere — she was born July 20, 1938 — plays Olenna Tyrell, aka the Queen of Thorns. To younger audiences, Rigg is best known for “Thrones,” her role as Mrs. James Bond, and a “Dr. Who” episode. But others remember the TV show that shot her to stardom: “The Avengers” (the real “Avengers,” long before the Marvel team), which was a tongue-in-cheek British spy actioner.

For two seasons, 1965-67, Rigg played Emma Peel, who often wore skin-tight catsuits as she outwitted and outfought evil masterminds. Emma
See full article at Variety - TV News »

It Came From The Tube: Blackout (1985)

There’s nothing like a good mystery, and HBO’s Blackout (1985) has a central premise that’s hard to deny: You survive a car crash, but have no memory of who you were before. Until, 7 years later, someone shows up and insinuates that you were a man who murdered his entire family and then fled. Now, could you go about your life, or would you want to know the truth? And if you were a killer, would that impulse return?

HBO’s original programming was still in its infancy, so the film, which debuted on Sunday, July 28th, plays as a barely more graphic version of a network offering, which is fine anyway; Blackout offers enough story and characterization to diminish any desire for extra blood or sleaze.

Once more, to our faux TV Guide:

Blackout (Sunday, check local listings for the 42 of you who have HBO)

Following a horrific car accident,
See full article at DailyDead »

The Abominable Dr. Phibes

The pomp and circumstance of Felix Mendelssohn’s “War March of the Priests,” as played on a grand pipe organ by a hooded figure seated in an opulent ballroom during the opening credits of The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971), perfectly sets the tone and timbre of director Robert Fuest’s film, both with playful irreverence and an eloquently ominous aural shroud of dread. The events we’re about to see play out in the film will hardly be a righteous procession of missionary or military zeal, as Mendelssohn’s music was originally intended to evoke. Instead, as it rings and bellows forth from the ornate instrument in this eerie chamber, one which feels at once haunted and strangely festive, Mendelssohn’s fervor is immediately cast with the unmistakable sense of having been drawn forth from someplace much darker than one of heavenly inspiration.

The organ itself rises from the bowels of
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Inside No. 9 series 3 episode 6 review: Private View

Louisa Mellor Mar 21, 2017

Spoilers ahead in our review of the final series 3 episode of Inside No. 9, which takes us to the world of modern art…

This review contains spoilers.

See related The Last Kingdom series 2 episode 1 review The Last Kingdom series 2: politics, battles and arselings What can we expect from new BBC drama, The Last Kingdom?

Inefficiency. It’s a criticism often levelled at the BBC by a certain species of rapacious vulture who sees the corporation not as the lustrous national gem it is, but as an unjust barrier to the extent to which they’re able to feather their own nests. The BBC is full of waste, they caw. The BBC must be more efficient!

If any of the vultures had the nous to watch BBC Two at 10pm on a Tuesday night for the past few weeks, they’d have been delighted. Well, not delighted.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Horror Highlights: Comet TV’s March Viewing Guide, Quarries, Nitehawk Shorts Festival, Crust, Terror Film Festival, Anders Manor

In today's Horror Highlights, we have a look at Comet TV's March viewing guide, release details for Quarries, info on Nitehawk Cinema's annual short film festival, the crowdfunding campaign for the sock-centric creature feature Crust (produced by Felissa Rose), details on the Terror Film Festival, and new stills from Anders Manor.

Comet TV's March Viewing Guide: "You Don’T Need A Subscription To Watch These Great Movies

They’Re Airing For Free On Comet!

Cherry 2000 (1988)

Monday March 13 at 8/7C

Static (1986)

Monday March 13 at 10/9C

The Twonky (1953)

Tuesday March 14 at 10/9C

The Bat People (1974)

Tuesday March 14 at 8/7C

War Gods of the Deep (1965)

Wednesday March 15 at 8/7c

The Man Who Fell to Earth (1987)

Wednesday March 15 at 10/9C

Encounter at Raven’s Gate (1990)

Thursday March 16 at 10/9C

The Lost Brigade (1993)

Thursday March 16 at 8/7C

The Beasts Within (1982)

Monday March 20 at 8/7C

Whoever Slew Auntie Roo? (1971)

Monday March 20 at 10/9C

Troll 2
See full article at DailyDead »

Giveaway – Win Tower of London starring Vincent Price

To celebrate the release of Tower of London – out Dual Format 13th Feb. 2017 – we are giving away a copy courtesy of Arrow Video!

Having made their mark on American horror cinema with three colourful adaptations of Edgar Allan PoeThe Fall of the House of Usher, Pit and the Pendulum and Tales of TerrorVincent Price and director Roger Corman enjoyed a brief hiatus from the macabre author with Tower of London. Shot in black and white, the film was loosely based on the Universal horror picture of the same name as well as two Shakespeare plays: a dash of Macbeth and a dollop of Richard III.

Price plays Richard of Gloucester, brother to a dying king and eager to take his place on the throne. When he is overlooked in favour of their sibling, the Duke of Clarence, things take a murderous turn. Richard goes on a murderous rage,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Competition: Win ‘Tower of London’ from Arrow Video

To celebrate the release of Tower of London – out Dual Format 13th Feb. 2017 – we are giving away a copy courtesy of Arrow Video!

Having made their mark on American horror cinema with three colourful adaptations of Edgar Allan PoeThe Fall of the House of Usher, Pit and the Pendulum and Tales of TerrorVincent Price and director Roger Corman enjoyed a brief hiatus from the macabre author with Tower of London. Shot in black and white, the film was loosely based on the Universal horror picture of the same name as well as two Shakespeare plays: a dash of Macbeth and a dollop of Richard III.

Price plays Richard of Gloucester, brother to a dying king and eager to take his place on the throne. When he is overlooked in favour of their sibling, the Duke of Clarence, things take a murderous turn. Richard goes on a murderous rage,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Exclusive Interview – Kyle Chandler talks Manchester by the Sea

Kyle Chandler discusses his role as Joe Chandler in Manchester by the Sea

When Kyle Chandler was preparing for his role in Kenneth Lonergan’s eagerly awaited new drama, Manchester by the Sea, he admits that the prospect of nailing his character’s distinctive accent was troubling him.

“I think I almost said ‘no’ just because of the Boston accent. I might have even asked Kenny, ‘can I keep my Texas accent? Does that work? Maybe my character went away and came back!’” he laughs. “But we had a wonderful dialect coach, and that all worked out. I think I did a pretty good job, and she kept a whip over me.”

Kyle spent many of his childhood years in Georgia and now lives in Texas with his wife and family, and his natural voice has that distinctive southern drawl. But he certainly did more than a “pretty good job” playing Joe.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

A Halloween Electric Dreamhouse

Yesterday, amid a crush of sweaty people desperate for last-minute props, I visited a local Halloween superstore with my daughter, looking for a Pikachu mask. Well, there wasn’t much to choose from in the Cute Kid Division. But this particular hall of Halloween hell definitely had the adult sensibility covered. Of course there were the usual skimpy or otherwise outrageous costumes for purchase —ladies, you can dress up like a sexy Kim Kardashian-esque vampire out for a night of Hollywood clubbing, and gents, how about impressing all the sexy Kim Kardashian vampires at your party by dressing up like a walking, talking matched set of cock and balls! It’s been a while since I’ve shopped for fake tools of terror, but it seems there’s been a real advance in sophistication in the market for “Leatherface-approved” (I swear) chainsaws with moving parts and authentic revving noises,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

UK film events this Halloween by Jennie Kermode

Beetlejuice

What's on in this world of film this Halloween? Terracotta is reaching out to the home viewing market, offering two scary DVDs for £6.66, and Sky will be premiering its remake of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, but if you'd rather get out and about, here's a look at what's happening around the UK.

Aberdeen

31st - Halloween Scare Fest: Beetlejuice and The Shining at the Underdog Film Club. 31st - Demon and The Shining at The Belmont.

Belfast

27th - Theatre Of Blood at the Strand Arts Centre. 28th - In The Mouth Of Madness at the Strand Arts Centre. 30th - The Backwoods Halloween Horror Marathon: Coraline, Tucker & Dale Vs Evil, Evil Dead 2, Cabin In The Woods and The Wicker Man in the Black Box.

Coraline

Birmingham

29th - Halloween at The Mac. 30th - Blade at The Artix in Bromsgrove.

In addition to this, there's the Hallowscream.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Raw Meat aka Death Line (1972)

  • DailyDead
British horror was still going through a transitional phase by the early ‘70s. Trying to turn people’s perception away from cobweb strewn castles and fog laden swamps, they played in the modern day with such classics as Tales from the Crypt, The Abominable Dr. Phibes, The Vault of Horror, Theatre of Blood, and Asylum. (Okay, those are either anthologies or Vincent Price films, but there are many other goodies as well.) So strong was the vibe that an American made the leap across the pond for his directorial debut, Raw Meat Aka Death Line (1972), a grimy, funny, and surprisingly poignant first effort from Gary Sherman (Dead and Buried).

Released in England in ’72 under the original Death Line title, it would take until September of ’73 to be unleashed on American soil by Aip under its better known moniker. Critics were decidedly mixed on Raw Meat; Roger Ebert considered it a “good debut” for Sherman,
See full article at DailyDead »

Reviews: "The Hound Of The Baskervilles" (1983) And "The Sign Of Four" (1983) Starring Ian Richardson; Blu-ray Releases From Second Sight

  • CinemaRetro
By Tim Greaves

Numerous actors have occupied the role of Sherlock Holmes over the decades, some more suited to the shoes of author Arthur Conan Doyle's famous consulting detective than others. One of the finest portrayals is that by Ian Richardson. Yet, sadly, his is also one that is often overlooked, not leastways because he played the character just twice (in a pair of 1983 films made for television), but also because his light was to be quickly eclipsed a year later by the arrival on TV screens of Jeremy Brett, whose interpretation of Holmes is considered by many to be the definitive one.

Sy Weintraub – who produced several Tarzan movies throughout the 60s and was executive producer on the popular long-running Ron Ely TV series –teamed up with Otto Plaschkes (whose producer credits include Georgie Girl and The Holcroft Covenant) with the intention of making several Holmes adventures headlining Richardson.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Waxwork (1988)

The late ’80s provided a veritable potpourri for horror film fanatics. Slashers had petered out, and filmmakers were keen on exploring other avenues, everything from a parasitic drug slug (Brain Damage) to possession (The Unholy), and all points in-between. Of course, mileage may vary, and many have fallen through the cracks or are best forgotten. Possibly one of the oddest of the bunch is Anthony Hickox’s Waxwork (1988), a goofball mixture of Hammer and Amicus brought kicking and screaming into the modern era with a touch o’ teen comedy sensibility. And in horror, odd never hurts—and sometimes it even helps create an unassuming delight such as this.

Produced and distributed by Vestron Pictures, who scored big the previous year with the terrifying Dirty Dancing, Waxwork was given a limited release in June in the Us and the rest of the world the following year. Made for $1,500,000, it only returned $800,000 domestically.
See full article at DailyDead »

Twilight Time Announces Blu-ray Release of Theatre Of Blood, Starring Vincent Price

This summer, Vincent Price fans who live stateside are in for a treat, because Twilight Time will release 1973’s Theatre of Blood on Blu-ray for the first time in the Us.

According to Blu-ray.com, Twilight Time has slated their Theatre of Blood Blu-ray for an August 16th release. Special features and cover art have yet to be revealed, but based on Twilight Time’s previous releases, there will likely only be 3,000 Blu-ray copies released and they are apt to sell out quickly, so be sure to keep an eye on the Screen Archives Entertainment website for pre-order availability.

Theatre of Blood held a special place in Price’s heart for giving him a chance to perform monologues from some of Shakespeare’s most epic works. Its arrival on Blu-ray in the Us has been eagerly awaited by Price’s fans for quite some time, making August 16th one of
See full article at DailyDead »
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