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Lyon’s Lumière Festival Fetes Peter Bogdanovich

Lyon’s Lumière Festival Fetes Peter Bogdanovich
The 10th Lumière Festival this year will honor filmmaker, film historian and heritage film enthusiast Peter Bogdanovich, director of such classics as “The Last Picture Show” and “Paper Moon,” with a film showcase and celebration of his recent works.

The tribute will include the French premiere of his restored 1979 drama “Saint Jack” and the presentation of “The Great Buster,” his new documentary about Buster Keaton.

The festival, which runs Oct. 13-21 in Lyon, France, will also screen 1971’s “The Last Picture Show”; the 1971 documentary “Directed by John Ford” (which the director revised and re-edited for a 2006 version); 1972’s “What’s Up, Doc?” and “Paper Moon,” from 1973.

A major voice of the New Hollywood wave, Bogdanovich will also discuss his long career as part of a master class in Lyon. Also screening for the first time in France as part of the tribute will be Bill Teck’s 2014 documentary “One Day
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lyon’s Lumière Festival Fetes Peter Bogdanovich

The 10th Lumière Festival this year will honor filmmaker, film historian and heritage film enthusiast Peter Bogdanovich, director of such classics as “The Last Picture Show” and “Paper Moon,” with a film showcase and celebration of his recent works.

The tribute will include the French premiere of his restored 1979 drama “Saint Jack” and the presentation of “The Great Buster,” his new documentary about Buster Keaton.

The festival, which runs Oct. 13-21 in Lyon, France, will also screen 1971’s “The Last Picture Show”; the 1971 documentary “Directed by John Ford” (which the director revised and re-edited for a 2006 version); 1972’s “What’s Up, Doc?” and “Paper Moon,” from 1973.

A major voice of the New Hollywood wave, Bogdanovich will also discuss his long career as part of a master class in Lyon. Also screening for the first time in France as part of the tribute will be Bill Teck’s 2014 documentary “One Day
See full article at Variety »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1970s: Meryl Streep, Maggie Smith, Tatum O’Neal … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1970s: Meryl Streep, Maggie Smith, Tatum O’Neal … ? [Poll]
Much like the Best Actress category, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in the 1970s went to some true living legends. This decade included the youngest acting winner in history, the shortest performance to win an Oscar in history, and the start for a woman who would go on to become the all-time nomination leader. So which Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of the 1970s is your favorite? Look back on each and vote in our poll below.

Helen Hayes, “Airport” (1970)— Hayes won her second Oscar thanks to her role in “Airport” as Ada Quonsett, an older woman who makes a habit of being a stowaway on airplanes. She previously won an Oscar in Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1931). Hayes became the first woman to “Egot,” winning the grand slam of major awards: the Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.

SEEJessica Lange (‘Tootsie’) named top Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1980s,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Jodie Foster movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Accused,’ ‘The Silence of the Lambs’

  • Gold Derby
Jodie Foster movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘The Accused,’ ‘The Silence of the Lambs’
Jodie Foster has been a working actress for over half a century. That fact is a bit surprising since she is only 55 years old. Foster started acting when she was only three and was cast in a famous Coppertone sun tan lotion commercial. The appearance led to numerous other commercials and guest appearances on practically all the popular TV shows of that era such as “Bonanza”, “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father”, and “Gunsmoke”. She would also take over Tatum O’Neal’s Oscar winning role in “Paper Moon” when that show was made into a television series. While she worked steadily none of her television series were particularly successful which probably helped her avoid the typecasting that kids from “The Brady Bunch” and other shows faced.

She only began to earn name recognition in her early teen years when she starred in a number of successful films, some directed by Martin Scorsese.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Kanopy: The Free Netflix Alternative Adds 100 Classic Paramount Titles — Exclusive

Educational distributor Kanopy has struck a deal with Paramount Pictures, adding 100 classic films from the studio’s library to the on-demand streaming service. Twenty-five of those titles – including “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure,” “Harold and Maude,” “Sunset Boulevard,” and “Saturday Night Fever” — are available to stream now. The other 75 titles will be added in the coming weeks and months. (The full list is at the bottom of this article.)

Kanopy has been a pioneer in the educational market, first in its move away from physical media and toward a streaming app that is available on Roku, Chromecast, Apple TV, Amazon Fire Tablet, and iOS and Android devices. Last year, they also expanded beyond universities and institutions and started to aggressively strike deals with public libraries making Kanopy available to a far wider percentage of the population. Now those with a public library card can access the free streaming service in a number of major cities,
See full article at Indiewire »

Jodie Foster movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Jodie Foster movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Jodie Foster has been a working actress for over half a century. That fact is a bit surprising since she is only 55 years old. Foster started acting when she was only three and was cast in a famous Coppertone sun tan lotion commercial. The appearance led to numerous other commercials and guest appearances on practically all the popular TV shows of that era such as “Bonanza”, “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father”, and “Gunsmoke”. She would also take over Tatum O’Neal’s Oscar winning role in “Paper Moon” when that show was made into a television series. While she worked steadily none of her television series were particularly successful which probably helped her avoid the typecasting that kids from “The Brady Bunch” and other shows faced.

She only began to earn name recognition in her early teen years when she starred in a number of successful films, some directed by Martin Scorsese.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tatum O’Neal says Spirituality Saved Her Life in New Interview

Tatum O’Neal has been in the spotlight since she was 10 years old. Her presence on screen has always been powerful—a statement that’s supported by the fact that she’s the youngest actor ever to have won a competitive Academy Award for her role in the movie Paper Moon in 1973. While her career may have started off strong, her personal life wasn’t always as easy. Being the daughter of two mainstream actors was no cakewalk. She’s the daughter of actors Ryan O’Neal and Joanna Moore, and in this recent interview, Tatum confesses how she was never baptized or brought up

Tatum O’Neal says Spirituality Saved Her Life in New Interview
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Jackson Browne Reels in Adam Sandler, T Bone Burnett for ‘Songs from the Cinema’ Bash

Jackson Browne Reels in Adam Sandler, T Bone Burnett for ‘Songs from the Cinema’ Bash
When we think of Jackson Browne and benefits, giant, arena-sized shows during the “No Nukes” era come to mind. But these days, he’s curating an annual Academy Awards week benefit concert on the opposite end of the intimacy and/or protest-song scale. Saturday night he served as the driving force behind an Oscars-eve “Songs from the Cinema” show in Hollywood that had Adam Sandler, T Bone Burnett, Rufus Wainwright, and others performing movie theme songs at a tiny club in Hollywood.

For Browne, the occasion represented a chance to be as socially conscious as ever — the show was a benefit for Artists for Peace and Justice, which funds educational institutions in Haiti — and to be thematically duty-bound to sing the song that everyone wants to hear even more than “Lives in the Balance”: “Somebody’s Baby,” the song that was absolutely robbed of an Oscar after it debuted
See full article at Variety - Film News »

When co-stars collide at Oscars: Does one win or do they split the vote? Sam Rockwell, pay attention!

When co-stars collide at Oscars: Does one win or do they split the vote? Sam Rockwell, pay attention!
It’s the dream of most actors and actresses to receive an Oscar nomination and, if they’re lucky, to win. But what happens when you’re up against a co-star from the same movie? Does one triumph or do they split the vote? Click through our photo gallery above of all the times this has happened throughout Academy Awards history.

Sam Rockwell and Woody Harrelson both scored Best Supporting Actor nominations for their work in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” It has been 26 years since Harvey Keitel and Ben Kingsley were both nominated for “Bugsy” (1991). Unfortunately for the duo they split their support and Jack Palance won for “City Slickers,” ironically a former victim of vote-splitting against his “Shane” co-star Brandon De Wilde (they lost to Frank Sinatra, “From Here to Eternity”).

See 2018 Oscar Best Picture predictions by experts: ‘Three Billboards’ pulls into tie with ‘The Shape of Water’ as voting ends Feb.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars flashback: Saoirse Ronan got her first nomination at just 13 years old for ‘Atonement’ [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Saoirse Ronan got her first nomination at just 13 years old for ‘Atonement’ [Watch]
At the ripe ol’ age of 23, Best Actress contender and “Lady Bird” star Saoirse Ronan is already on her third Oscar nomination. She was last shortlisted two years ago in the same category for “Brooklyn,” but her first nomination came 10 years ago when she was only 13 years old.

The fresh-faced teenager was up for Best Supporting Actress for her breakthrough performance in “Atonement” as Briony Tallis, Keira Knightley’s meddling younger sister who alters multiple lives with a damning accusation. Ronan, who would’ve become the third youngest acting winner behind Tatum O’Neal (“Paper Moon”), who was 10, and Anna Paquin (“The Piano”), who was 11, lost to BAFTA winner Tilda Swinton (“Michael Clayton”) during a divided year with multiple people splitting the precursors. The other nominees were Golden Globe champ Cate Blanchett (“I’m Not There), SAG champ Ruby Dee (“American Gangster”) and Critics’ Choice champ Amy Ryan (“Gone Baby Gone
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey

The Best Child Performances in Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey
Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: In honor of “The Florida Project,” which has just started its platform release across the country, what is the greatest child performance in a film?

Jordan Hoffman (@JHoffman), The Guardian, Vanity Fair

I can agonize over this question or I can go at this Malcolm Gladwell “Blink”-style. My answer is Tatum O’Neal in “Paper Moon.” She’s just so funny and tough, which of course makes the performance all the more heartbreaking. She won the freaking Oscar at age 10 for this and I’d really love to give a more deep cut response, but why screw around? Paper Moon is a perfect film and she is the lynchpin.
See full article at Indiewire »

Gifted review – real issues turned into gooey fantasy

Plot contrivances and a copout ending compromise a film that tries to tackle the issue of a child prodigy caught up in family battles

There are one or two first-act laughs and nice moments in this spirited heartwarmer from screenwriter Tom Flynn, once much admired in script form on the 2014 Black List of unproduced screenplays. Yet the interesting touches give way to unconvincing contrivances and a final copout. Marc Webb (of The Amazing Spider-Man and (500) Days of Summer) directs. Chris Evans plays Frank, a hunky, beardedly handsome single guy in Florida with the entirely preposterous Kevin-Costner-ish job of “fixing boats”. His former job is, incidentally, no less implausible – disillusioned college professor. Frank is now legal guardian to his orphaned niece, Mary, who at seven years old is a brilliant maths whiz, and so was her troubled mum whom we see in a photo with a super-brainy short haircut. Young Mary
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Netflix Will Release Unseen Orson Welles Film The Other Side of The Wind

In what can only be described as a major win for the digital streaming platform, the previously unfinished and unreleased final film by legendary filmmaker Orson Welles will finally reach audiences, courtesy of Netflix. The Other Side Of The Wind has languished in locked rooms in Paris for four decades, as a variety of producers have attempted to negotiate acceptable deals with the Welles Estate. Now, producer Filip Jan Rymsza (Sangue Azul) has succeeded, striking a deal that will see the completion of editing and a global Netflix release, as he explained to Wellesnet.

“Everything is signed. All the deals are fully closed, both the Netflix deal and all of the rights deals. Everything we have done for the past year and a half has been gruelling, but that’s finally over and now we get to be creative and finally bring this film to life.”

The Other Side Of The Wind
See full article at We Got This Covered »

‘Logan’ Composer Marco Beltrami on R-Rated Wolverine Minimalist Score

‘Logan’ Composer Marco Beltrami on R-Rated Wolverine Minimalist Score
Hugh Jackman and director James Mangold both wanted to end the Wolverine saga on a grace note. The fact that it’s uncompromisingly brutal (fully justifying its R-rating) only reinforces the final salvation. It’s their version of western classic “Shane,” and the minimalist score from Marco Beltrami (Oscar-nominated for “The Hurt Locker”) hits the right emotional chord.

“I knew it was going to be tricky because the visuals were going to lead and the music played more of a textural role,” Beltrami told IndieWire. “Jim didn’t want a [traditional] thematic score — he wanted an emotionally supportive score. So there was a delicate balance, and I experimented with some unique instruments for it.”

For “The Old Man Logan” theme (which you can listen to below courtesy of Lakeshore Records), this included Hammond organ, glass harmonica, and drum kits. This established the world-weary mood of the mutant hiding out in a
See full article at Indiewire »

Richard Portman, ‘Star Wars’ Sound Engineer and 11-Time Oscar Nominee, Dies at 82

Richard Portman, ‘Star Wars’ Sound Engineer and 11-Time Oscar Nominee, Dies at 82
Sound engineer Richard Portman, who received 11 Academy Award nominations and won for his work on Michael Cimino’s “The Deer Hunter,” died on Saturday at his home in Tallahassee, Fla. He was 82.

“He was an icon of his craft of motion picture sound re-recording, recognized with the highest honors of his field,” his daughter Jennifer Portman wrote on her Facebook page. “He was eccentric, irreverent, and real.”

Portman worked on nearly 200 movies and mixed the sound for George Lucas’ “Star Wars.”

Portman received two Oscar sound nominations in 1973 for Francis Ford Coppola’s “The Godfather” and Michael Ritchie’s “The Candidate.” He was also double-nominated in 1974 for Peter Bogdanovich’s “Paper Moon” and Mike Nichols’ “The Day of the Dolphin.”

Portman received his first nom in 1971 for “Kotch,” directed by Jack Lemmon. He was also up for Oscars for Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein,” Herbert Ross’ “Funny Lady,” Michael Apted’s “Coal Miner’s Daughter,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

James Mangold Talks Logan at 20th Century Fox’s Genre Showcase, Read Our Impressions of the First 42 Minutes

In December at their 2017 Genre Showcase event, 20th Century Fox previewed the first 42 minutes of Logan, the eagerly awaited final chapter of the Wolverine saga. Daily Dead was in attendance at the event, and to give readers a big idea of what to expect, we have highlights from director James Mangold’s comments at the event, as well as our impressions of the intense footage that was shown.

After appearing as the character in now nine films (including his X-Men: First Class cameo) Hugh Jackman teams up once again with director James Mangold to bring his run as the “Mutant Formerly Known As Weapon X” to an end.

The two last brought the character to the screen in 2013 with The Wolverine, when original director Darren Aronofsky bowed out after a lengthy pre-production phase. The results were mostly positive, but moments felt hamstrung by superhero movie clichés, such as the out-of-place
See full article at DailyDead »

Entertainment Feature: Top 20 Celebrity Portraits of 2016, By Photographer Joe Arce

Chicago – The year 2016 was a dangerous one to be a famous person. In the past twelve months, one dozen of my former photo subjects passed away, celebrities who at one time or another famously posed for my lens. However, on a positive note, at least photos are forever. Or to quote the immortal words of Pee Wee Herman – “Why don’t you take a picture, it will last longer!”

The ranking of the portraits are based on a combination of the star power wattage of the subjects, the artistic results and the difficulty of landing the quarry…for those budding smart-phone-celebrity-stalkers who may wish to play along at home. So without further adieu, I present my top 20 celebrity portraits of 2016.

20. Peter Bogdanovich

Filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Here’s to Peter Bogdanovich, who apart from Woody Allen is one of my all-time favorite directors.
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

New to Streaming: FilmStruck, ‘The Terrorizers,’ ‘Sausage Party,’ ‘Tickled,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Anthropoid (Sean Ellis)

Throw a dart at a map, and you can make a World War II movie set in whatever place you hit. Of course, pretty much any film about the Good War that doesn’t focus on the American (sometimes British) point of view of the conflict will probably seem “random” to the mainstream; one odd side-effect of Hollywood’s Oscar-baity love of the era. But there
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Jack Reacher: Never Go Back’ Director Talks Importance of Strong Female Characters in Blockbusters

‘Jack Reacher: Never Go Back’ Director Talks Importance of Strong Female Characters in Blockbusters
It’s never been easy to put filmmaker Edward Zwick into a box. The multi-hyphenate has long eschewed sticking to just one genre and even one medium. He helped launch seminal television series like “Thirtysomething” (which he co-created alongside long-time partner Marshall Herskovitz) and “My So-Called Life” (which the pair executive produced) to the small screen, while also directing historical epics like “Glory” and “Defiance,” modern classics like “Courage Under Fire” and “Blood Diamond” and even the odd romantic comedy — or two: Zwick helmed “Love & Other Drugs” and the original “About Last Night…” feature.

Zwick has done it all, but with his latest film, “Jack Reacher: Never Go Back,” he’s managed to do something new: Try his hand at a bone-breaking action sequel, featuring America’s ass-kicking sweetheart in the title role. Zwick and Tom Cruise have worked together before, thanks to the 2003’s epic “The Last Samurai,” and
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: Director Icon Peter Bogdanovich Honored at 52nd Chicago International Film Festival

Chicago – If Peter Bogdanovich had only been a film writer and critic, he still would have made a major contribution to cinema culture. But he also chose to direct, and besides producing arguably one of the best American films ever made (“The Last Picture Show”), he continues to work and fulfill his creative vision.

Bogdanovich was honored at the 52nd Chicago International Film Festival with a Gold Hugo Career Lifetime Achievement designation, which was augmented with a magnificent documentary about a period in his career called “One Day Since Yesterday: Peter Bogdanovich and the Lost American Film.” The film tells the story of “They All Laughed” (1981), a post modern screwball comedy starring Audrey Hepburn, John Ritter and Dorothy Stratten. Bogdanovich was in a relationship with Stratten during the production of the film, and she was murdered by her ex-husband while the film was being edited. The tragedy, the prescience of
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »
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