A committed film director struggles to complete his movie while coping with a myriad of crises, personal and professional, among the cast and crew.

Director:

François Truffaut

Writers:

François Truffaut (screenplay), Jean-Louis Richard (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Won 1 Oscar. Another 12 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jacqueline Bisset ... Julie Baker
Valentina Cortese ... Séverine
Dani ... Liliane, la stagiaire scripte
Alexandra Stewart ... Stacey
Jean-Pierre Aumont ... Alexandre
Jean Champion Jean Champion ... Bertrand, le producteur
Jean-Pierre Léaud ... Alphonse (as Jean-Pierre Leaud)
François Truffaut ... Ferrand, le réalisateur
Nike Arrighi ... Odile, la maquilleuse
Nathalie Baye ... Joëlle, la scripte
Maurice Seveno Maurice Seveno ... Le reporter TV
David Markham ... Dr. Michael Nelson
Bernard Menez ... Bernard, l'accessoiriste
Gaston Joly Gaston Joly ... Lajoie, le régisseur
Zénaïde Rossi Zénaïde Rossi ... Madame Lajoie
Edit

Storyline

The shooting of "Je vous presente Pamela" (may I introduce Pamela) begins. This is the story of en English married wife falling in love and running away with the father of her French husband. Will be simultaneously shown the shooting, the behavior of the people (including the technical team) on the set, and a part of their private life (a factor of complication)... Written by Yepok

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A movie for people who love movies.

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

When director Ferrand listens to a piece of music prepared for the film-within-a-film by Georges Delerue, he is listening to a piece from Two English Girls (1971). See more »

Goofs

When Ferrand is talking to Julie in her room, his left ear appears without a hearing aid for a second. See more »

Quotes

Ferrand: What is a film director? A man who's asked questions about everything. Sometimes he knows the answers.
See more »

Crazy Credits

This film is dedicated to Lillian and Dorothy Gish. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Pocket Dragon Adventures: Day for Knight (1998) See more »

User Reviews

 
Simply the greatest film about making a film ever made!
30 September 2003 | by RWiggumSee all my reviews

"Shooting a movie is like a stagecoach trip. At first you hope for a nice ride. Then you just hope to reach your destination."

Early in the film, director Ferrand, played by François Truffaut, says this in a voice-over of 'Day for Night'. A lot of the film illustrates that this is a very true sentence.

In his legendary Hitchcock book, Truffaut says at one point that it would be a nice idea to make a film about making a film, and Hitchcock agrees. Luckily Truffaut liked that idea enough to actually make this film, as 'Day for Night' is probably the best film ever made about making a film.

We are on the set of 'Meet Pamela'. 'Meet Pamela' is a love and revenge story, about a man falling in love with daughter-in-law. It looks very much like a pretty mediocre film. I doubt I would like it. But that's good, as it doesn't distract us from what's happening on the set, from the many characters.

We get to know the cast and crew of 'Meet Pamela': Julie Baker, a second generation Hollywood star whose nervous breakdown she's recovering from causes insurance problems; Alphonse, a very jealous, very neurotic French actor who's so madly in love with a girl he organizes the job of the script girl for her just to have her near; Alexandre, a veteran actor who played many lovers in his life, but is actually a closet homosexual; Severine, an Italian actress with an alcohol problem who used to play opposite Alexandre frequently in her career, but hasn't talked to him in years, maybe because she found out she had no chance to become his real-life lover. From the crew, we especially remember Joelle, the production assistant who almost seems to be more involved in the making of the film than director Ferrand (it is her who has the film's most often quoted line: "I'd drop a guy for a film, but I'd never drop a film for a guy"), Liliane, the girl who got the job as a script girl only because Alphonse wanted to have her around him, who doesn't really seem to be interested in the film - or in Alphonse; Odile, the makeup girl who also got a bit part in the film; Bernard, the prop man, who gives us with his every day work a look behind the scenes of a film; and the unit manager Lajoie, whose wife is always around and at one point shouts at the cast and crew because she just can't understand their 'immoral' behavior.

The film doesn't have a plot of it's own, but it shows us all these characters and their problems, trying to get a film made and getting over one catastrophe after the next, sometimes something as harmless as a kitten refusing to drink milk or Stacey, a supporting actress causing scheduling problems because of her pregnancy, sometimes something more serious as Alphonse refusing to go on acting after Liliane leaves the set with a stunt man, with even more complications to follow when Julie tries to cure Alphonse's neurosis. But not even a lethal car accident can stop the making of the film.

'Day for Night' also has brilliant performances, but three stand out: Nathalie Baye in her first notable performance as the omni-competent Joelle and Jean-Pierre Léaud, who never was better in his life than here as Alphonse, would make it a worthwhile film alone. But it is Valentina Cortese who steals the show as the fading actress Severine. Her scene opposite Alexandre in which she can't remember her dialog and suggests just saying numbers (she did the same when she worked with "Federico") is priceless.

At one point Ferrand says that a director is a man who is constantly asked many questions and sometimes knows the answer, and it is sort of a surprise that the one man who "invented" the auteur theory, which more or less says that a film is the director's work, makes a film that shows how many people's work is involved in the making of a film. But it is not only a film about people making films: Many of the characters (most notably Ferrand, Alphonse and Joelle) are film enthusiasts, and the entire film is a film from a film lover about film lovers for film lovers. It's Truffaut's best and shouldn't be missed by cinephiles.


97 of 110 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 78 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

France | Italy

Language:

French | English | Italian

Release Date:

7 September 1973 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Day for Night See more »

Filming Locations:

Côte d'Azur, France See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$11,206, 25 April 1999

Gross USA:

$509

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$509
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color | Black and White (dream sequences)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed