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Alexander Payne Says ‘Downsizing’ Is the Most Difficult Film He’s Ever Made — and Addresses Its Icy Reception — Tribeca

Alexander Payne Says ‘Downsizing’ Is the Most Difficult Film He’s Ever Made — and Addresses Its Icy Reception — Tribeca
Alexander Payne was just at the Tribeca Film Festival for a Director’s Series edition of Tribeca Talks, where he revealed that “Downsizing” was the most difficult film he’s ever made. Dick Cavett moderated the discussion, which eventually touched on the icy reception of his ambitious drama released last year.

Matt Damon and Hong Chau star in the film, whose out-there premise helped make it one of the most anticipated films of 2017. Payne said it was difficult on every level — writing, financing, editing — and also addressed the lukewarm reviews it was met with upon opening late last year, suggesting that its ambitious narrative may have been too much to fit into the framework of a single film.

Payne was also asked whether any of his movies would be different if he made them today. “If you’re an open director, you cannot help but have the winds of history blow through your film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Gerald Ayres, Producer of 'The Last Detail' and 'Cisco Pike,' Dies at 82

Gerald Ayres, Producer of 'The Last Detail' and 'Cisco Pike,' Dies at 82
Gerald Ayres, a former Columbia Pictures executive who produced Jack Nicholson's The Last Detail and wrote the screenplay for George Cukor's final film, has died. He was 82.

Ayres died April 7 of complications from dementia at a hospice facility in Watertown, New York, his spouse, Guy Ayres, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Ayres also produced Cisco Pike (1972), starring Kris Kristofferson, Gene Hackman and Karen Black, and wrote and produced Foxes (1980), which starred Jodie Foster in a coming-of-age-tale set in the San Fernando Valley. (Ayres also was set to direct that film, but the studio replaced him with Adrian...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Gerald Ayres, Producer of 'The Last Detail' and 'Cisco Pike,' Dies at 82

Gerald Ayres, a former Columbia Pictures executive who produced Jack Nicholson's The Last Detail and wrote the screenplay for George Cukor's final film, has died. He was 82.

Ayres died April 7 of complications from dementia at a hospice facility in Watertown, New York, his spouse, Guy Ayres, told The Hollywood Reporter.

Ayres also produced Cisco Pike (1972), starring Kris Kristofferson, Gene Hackman and Karen Black, and wrote and produced Foxes (1980), which starred Jodie Foster in a coming-of-age-tale set in the San Fernando Valley. (Ayres also was set to direct that film, but the studio replaced him with Adrian...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s: Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Denzel Washington … ? [Poll]
Like the other acting winners of the 1980s, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor went to big stars and character actors alike. The ’80s featured big-name winners like Jack Nicholson, Kevin Kline, Sean Connery and Michael Caine alongside hardworking veterans like John Gielgud, Louis Gossett Jr. and Don Ameche. The Academy also rewarded emerging talent, like Timothy Hutton, Haing S. Ngor and the now double-champ Denzel Washington.

So who is your favorite Best Supporting Actor winner of the 1980s? Look back on each performance and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Timothy Hutton, “Ordinary People” (1980) — Hutton came out of the gate strong with his heartbreaking performance in Best Picture winner “Ordinary People.” Hutton plays Conrad Jarrett, a teenager wracked with guilt after his brother is killed in a boating accident. Hutton is clearly the lead of the film, but at age 20, the studio may have felt it fairer
See full article at Gold Derby »

Hal Ashby Documentary ‘Hal’ Will Get Theatrical Bow Via Oscilloscope

Hal Ashby Documentary ‘Hal’ Will Get Theatrical Bow Via Oscilloscope
Oscilloscope Laboratories has acquired North American rights to Hal, the Amy Scott documentary about iconoclast director Hal Ashby that had its world premiere in January at the Sundance Film Festival. A theatrical release later this year is planned. Ashby, whose work especially in the 1970s included Harold & Maude, The Last Detail, Shampoo and Coming Home, is often overlooked amid the crowd of luminaries from his generation. The docu employs rare archival materials…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Hal Ashby Documentary ‘Hal’ Sells to Oscilloscope for North America

Hal Ashby Documentary ‘Hal’ Sells to Oscilloscope for North America
Oscilloscope Laboratories has acquired North American rights to Amy Scott’s Hal Ashby documentary “Hal,” which premiered earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival.

Oscilloscope will release the film theatrically in 2018. Ashby directed “Harold and Maude,” “The Last Detail,” “Shampoo” and “Being There.” He won an Oscar for editing “In the Heat of the Night” and was nominated for directing “Coming Home” and editing “The Russians are Coming, the Russians are Coming.” He died in 1988 at the age of 59.

Scott’s portrait uses archival materials, interviews, personal letters, and audio recordings to reveal a passionate, obsessive artist.

“We cannot imagine a more perfect home for this film,” Scott said. “‘Hal’ is as much a love letter to Hal Ashby as it is a testament to the indefatigable spirit of independent filmmaking, and no one celebrates true independent cinema like Oscilloscope.”

Dan Berger of Oscilloscope said, “As a true film geek,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

O-Scope acquires Hal Ashby documentary

“The world needs more Hal Ashbys,” says Oscilloscope’s Dan Berger.

Oscilloscope Laboratories has acquired North American rights to Amy Scott’s documentary Hal following its recent world premiere at Sundance.

O-Scope plans to release the film theatrically this year after negotiating the deal with Cinetic Media on behalf of the filmmakers.

Hal Ashby is widely regarded as one of the great overlooked directors and was responsible for Harold And Maude, The Last Detail, Shampoo, Coming Home, and Being There, among others.

Scott’s portrait accesses rare archival footage, personal letters and audio recordings to reveal the artist who frequently clashed with the Hollywood machine.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Richard Linklater Shooting A Mysterious New 1960s Set Movie

Richard Linklater Shooting A Mysterious New 1960s Set Movie
As per usual, Richard Linklater follows nobody’s path but his own. His last few films have seen him zig and zag from “Dazed & Confused” spiritual sequel “Everybody Wants Some!!” to “The Last Detail” followup “Last Flag Flying” to the upcoming dramedy “Where’d You Go, Bernadette.” However, it looks like the filmmaker is going a bit undercover again, just like he did with “Boyhood.”

Announced at the end of December, but seemingly lost amidst year-end coverage and general exhaustion, The Houston Chronicle revealed that Linklater is currently at work on “a film set during the summer of 1969” in Houston.
See full article at The Playlist »

Sundance 2018 Review: Hal, A Great Director of the 1970s Gets His Due

The so-called “New Hollywood” of the 1970s was driven by a number of filmmakers, many of them film school trained, who broke with many established modes of production and benefited from the opportunities afforded them by the collapse of the old studio system. Directors such as Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Peter Bogdanovich, Brian De Palma, Robert Altman, Terrence Malick, William Friedkin, and others debuted films or made their breakthrough works during this period. One major director of this era who’s rather less often cited is Hal Ashby, who had a remarkable run of great films in the 70’s. Seven films in nine years, to be exact: The Landlord (1970), Harold and Maude (1971), The Last Detail (1973), Shampoo (1975), Bound for Glory (1976), Coming...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actor Oscar winner of the 1990s: Anthony Hopkins, Tom Hanks, Al Pacino … ? [Poll]
The Best Actor Oscar winners of the 1990s include some of the most legendary actors in film history, like Anthony Hopkins, Al Pacino, Tom Hanks and Jack Nicholson. We’ve also seen actors springboard off their victories to have fruitful careers in film, like Geoffrey Rush and Nicolas Cage. Now, two decades later, which do you consider the greatest Best Actor winner of the 1990s?

Refamiliarize yourself with the winners and be sure to vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Actor.)

Jeremy Irons, “Reversal of Fortune” (1990) — The ’90s began with Jeremy Irons being awarded for “Reverse of Fortune,” in which the actor plays Claus von Bulow, a man charged with attempted murder after his wife goes into diabetic shock. Despite a long career in film this remains Irons’ only nomination and win, though he has won two Emmys for voiceover work and another for his performance in 2005’s “Elizabeth I.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Hal’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Hal’
In the seven landmark movies he made during the ’70s, from his very first feature, 1970’s “The Landlord” (way ahead of the curve in its post-bleeding-heart racial awareness), up through 1979’s “Being There” (way ahead of the curve in its dryly amused satirical image politics), with the New Hollywood classics “The Last Detail” (1973) and “Shampoo” (1975) coming in between, the director Hal Ashby had an entrancingly shaggy, inquiring, no-fuss style that always revealed the most vulnerable and moonstruck qualities of the characters he showed us. By the time an Ashby movie was over, you knew every last facet and hidden beauty wart of the people on-screen. Their daydreams fused with ours.

So it would seem only fitting if “Hal,” a documentary portrait of Ashby, rustled up a certain stubborn intimacy to reveal who this intensely revered and softly mysterious filmmaker really was. Anyone drawn to the subject will probably go into “Hal” knowing certain basic things about Hal Ashby:
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie Review – Last Flag Flying (2017)

Last Flag Flying, 2017.

Directed by Richard Linklater.

Starring Steve Carell, Bryan Cranston, Laurence Fishburne, J. Quinton Johnson, Deanna Reed-Foster, Yul Vasquez, Graham Wolfe, Jeff Monahan, and Cicely Tyson.

Synopsis:

Thirty years after they served together in Vietnam, a former Navy Corpsman Larry “Doc” Shepherd re-unites with his old buddies, former Marines Sal Nealon and Reverend Richard Mueller, to bury his son, a young Marine killed in the Iraq War.

Richard Linklater finds the intimate amongst the grandiose. His films tackle glancing moments within sweeping vistas. Where Boyhood and the Before Trilogy – his two magnum opus’ – placed focus on the small conversations, the quiet moments that a decade later take on far larger meanings, his latest, Last Flag Flying, a spiritual sequel to Hal Ashby’s The Last Detail ruminates on memory and the fractious manner in which nostalgia is warped.

Steve Carrell (in a career best performance) is Larry “Doc” Shephard,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Last Flag Flying review – Richard Linklater's treacly trip goes nowhere

Bryan Cranston leads a spiritual sequel to The Last Detail that squanders its promise with a heartwarmer-by-numbers script

A sequel to Hal Ashby’s 1973 American new wave classic The Last Detail from the director of Boyhood? That should theoretically be something special. But what a bland and sugary texture there is to this very conservative, undemanding oldster roadtrip.

Related: Richard Linklater on Last Flag Flying: 'We're not meant to kill. We're not cut out for it'

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Hal': Film Review | Sundance 2018

'Hal': Film Review | Sundance 2018
One of the comparatively unsung luminaries of 1970s American cinema receives a very fine tribute in Hal, an in-depth look at director Hal Ashby. Never a household name like Spielberg, Scorsese, Coppola or Lucas and without a genuine blockbuster to his credit, the former film editor nonetheless directed seven of the finest and most emblematic films of the New Hollywood Cinema era: The Landlord, Harold and Maude, The Last Detail, Shampoo, Bound for Glory, Coming Home and Being There. Then it was all over. Digging deep into the archives for rare and revealing material to accompany interviews with many of...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Exclusive: Bryan Cranston talks the patriotic and critical combination behind Last Flag Flying and old mobiles phones

  • HeyUGuys
Author: Scott Davis

One of the many new releases this week is the long-awaited UK debut of Richard Linklater’s latest film, Last Flag Flying. A “spiritual” sequel to 1973 Jack Nicholson-starrer The Last Detail, the new drama stars Steve Carell, Laurence Fishburne and Bryan Cranston as three Vietnam veterans who reunite to help Carell’s character bury his son who has was killed in Iraq. To celebrate the release, we sat down to chat to Cranston about the film.

Both a heart-warming film about friendship and the bonds of Army life as well as being patriotic, it’s also a commentary on the Us government and their treatment of their veterans and Cranston says it was the combination and bravery of both that drew him to the material, saying:

“Absolutely, I don’t think you can have one without the other. In the great war, World War II, the
See full article at HeyUGuys »

New to Streaming: ‘Thelma,’ ‘Loving Vincent,’ ‘Last Flag Flying,’ ‘The Lure,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (David Lowery)

If Bonnie and Clyde survived their final stand-off and attempted to live a life after crime, we would have the basic set-up of writer/director David Lowery‘s subdued, deeply felt Ain’t Them Bodies Saints. But that is just the beginning, as this drama skirts around the major peaks one may find in another film of its kind, instead focusing on the quiet,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Hal’: Watch The First Three Minutes Of Sundance-Bound Hal Ashby Documentary

‘Hal’: Watch The First Three Minutes Of Sundance-Bound Hal Ashby Documentary
The Sundance Film Festival’s U.S. Documentary competition is the launch pad for Hal, Amy Scott’s feature-length docu about iconoclast director Hal Ashby. Cinetic Media is aboard to sell the title at the fest, and the film premieres Monday in Park City. Sundance kicks off Thursday and runs through January 28. As befits a subject whose stretch of work especially in the 1970s included Harold & Maude, The Last Detail, Shampoo and Coming Home (he was Oscar-nominated for that…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Record Opener ‘Disaster Artist’ and ‘The Shape of Water’ Lead Specialty Box Office Surge

  • Indiewire
Record Opener ‘Disaster Artist’ and ‘The Shape of Water’ Lead Specialty Box Office Surge
The hits keep on coming. Both “The Disaster Artist” (A24) and “The Shape of Water” (Fox Searchlight) opened strong, despite the usual strong-fall off in post-Thanksgiving audiences. Last year the month of November saw only one specialized release, “Manchester By the Sea,” pull an opening platform per theater average over $60,000. This year has already seen five.

The Disaster Artist” (in 11 markets) showed the best performance in New York/Los Angeles of any title this year (nearly $120,000 per theater), besting last weekend’s numbers for “Call Me By Your Name” (Sony Pictures Classics). They join other Oscar-bound strong openers including “Lady Bird” (A24) and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (Fox Searchlight).

This marks unprecedented strength over such a short period, with “Lady Bird” and “Three Billboards” already performing well in wider release. At some point exhibitors are going to be challenged to handle so many hits (all will not go wide
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Review: Last Flag Flying Review

Dialogue in film can be tricky. Whether the screenwriter is trying to lay out exposition or have an emotional moment between two characters, the nuances of screenwriting are understandably crucial to a successful film. That is why most of Richard Linklater’s films are almost always successful. The man behind the “Before” trilogy (Before Sunrise [1995], Before Sunset [2004], and Before Midnight [2013]), Dazed and Confused (1993), Everybody Wants Some!! (2016), and one of the decade’s best films, Boyhood (2014), has a talent for creating entertaining and thoughtful movies that feature essentially just people talking. His characters walk through the streets of Vienna talking about their lives (Before Sunrise), talk at parties on the weekend leading up to the first day of a college semester (Everybody Wants Some!!), and talk about what they want to see in the newest Star Wars movie around a campfire (Boyhood). Linklater is the master of creating natural dialogue between
See full article at CinemaNerdz »

Genre, Indie and Blockbuster Directors Jostle for Awards Attention

Genre, Indie and Blockbuster Directors Jostle for Awards Attention
From Paul Thomas Anderson to Guillermo del Toro to Patty Jenkins, a wide variety of directors across genres are vying for attention this awards season.

Paul Thomas Anderson

“The Phantom Thread

Not a frame of Anderson’s latest has yet been seen by the public, nor is much known about it, but he’s the rare filmmaker whose name alone can stoke anticipation. The fact that this 1950s-set film about the fashion world also stars Daniel Day-Lewis, who plans to retire from acting, only piques interest further.

Darren Aronofsky

Mother!”

Easily the most divisive studio film of 2017, and presumably intentionally so, Aronofsky’s “Mother!” could curry favor among his fellow directors for the sheer boldness of his vision, as he and star Jennifer Lawrence ascend ever-escalating levels of madness.

Sean Baker

The Florida Project

An indie darling du jour thanks to his sleeper “Tangerine,” Baker returned with yet another warm, sly-humored study of
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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