The Harrad Experiment (1973) - News Poster

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Hollywood Legacies: Exclusive Photos of the Hustons, Poitiers, Sutherlands and More Showbiz Families

The Hedren-Griffith-Johnsons

Back on the 1972 set of The Harrad Experiment, a 22-year-old Don Johnson, in his highest-profile role yet, acted opposite a legend in the making, Tippi Hedren. Melanie Griffith, Hedren's 14-year-old daughter, who later became one of the most in-demand actresses of the '80s and '90s, played a student in the film. "We were in the stairwell of this Anheuser-Busch Estate waiting for a setup," says Johnson. "We started chitchatting." Recalls Griffith of a scenario that today might spark accusations and perhaps even the attention of law enforcement: "I thought he was the most beautiful person I'd...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Hollywood Legacies: Exclusive Photos of the Hustons, Poitiers, Sutherlands and More Showbiz Families

Hollywood Legacies: Exclusive Photos of the Hustons, Poitiers, Sutherlands and More Showbiz Families
The Hedren-Griffith-Johnsons

Back on the 1972 set of The Harrad Experiment, a 22-year-old Don Johnson, in his highest-profile role yet, acted opposite a legend in the making, Tippi Hedren. Melanie Griffith, Hedren's 14-year-old daughter, who later became one of the most in-demand actresses of the '80s and '90s, played a student in the film. "We were in the stairwell of this Anheuser-Busch Estate waiting for a setup," says Johnson. "We started chitchatting." Recalls Griffith of a scenario that today might spark accusations and perhaps even the attention of law enforcement: "I thought he was the most beautiful person I'd...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Night Moves

Arthur Penn’s detective movie is one of the best ever in the genre, one that rewards repeat viewings particularly well. Gumshoe Harry Moseby compartmentalizes his marriage, his job, his past and the greedy Hollywood has-beens he meets, not realizing that everything is interconnected, and fully capable of assembling a world-class conspiracy. Gene Hackman tops a sterling cast in the film that introduced most of us to Melanie Griffith.

Night Moves

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1975 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date August 15, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Gene Hackman, Jennifer Warren, Melanie Griffith, Susan Clark, Edward Binns, Harris Yulin, Kenneth Mars, Janet Ward, James Woods, Anthony Costello.

Cinematography: Bruce Surtees

Production Designer: George Jenkins

Film Editor: Dede Allen

Original Music: Michael Small

Written by Alan Sharp

Produced by Robert M. Sherman

Directed by Arthur Penn

Night Moves is a superb detective thriller that plays with profound ideas without getting its fingers burned.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Ted Post

Influential figure in Clint Eastwood's career who directed Magnum Force and Hang 'em High

It is no exaggeration to declare that the film and television director Ted Post, who has died aged 95, contributed greatly to the making of Clint Eastwood into a Hollywood superstar. When Eastwood returned to the Us from Europe, where he had starred in three Sergio Leone "spaghetti" westerns, Post directed him in Hang 'em High (1968), which consolidated Eastwood's screen persona as the impassive, laconic, gun-for-hire loner. A few years later, Post directed Eastwood again, in Magnum Force (1973), the first Dirty Harry sequel, which outdid Don Siegel's original film commercially. Eastwood said that Leone, Siegel and Post were the three most influential directors in his career.

In 1959, the unknown Eastwood – who had appeared in bit parts in 11 films – moved to CBS for his first leading role, as the amiable fresh-faced sidekick Rowdy Yates, in the television western series Rawhide.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ted Post

Influential figure in Clint Eastwood's career who directed Magnum Force and Hang 'em High

It is no exaggeration to declare that the film and television director Ted Post, who has died aged 95, contributed greatly to the making of Clint Eastwood into a Hollywood superstar. When Eastwood returned to the Us from Europe, where he had starred in three Sergio Leone "spaghetti" westerns, Post directed him in Hang 'em High (1968), which consolidated Eastwood's screen persona as the impassive, laconic, gun-for-hire loner. A few years later, Post directed Eastwood again, in Magnum Force (1973), the first Dirty Harry sequel, which outdid Don Siegel's original film commercially. Eastwood said that Leone, Siegel and Post were the three most influential directors in his career.

In 1959, the unknown Eastwood – who had appeared in bit parts in 11 films – moved to CBS for his first leading role, as the amiable fresh-faced sidekick Rowdy Yates, in the television western series Rawhide.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

'Rawhide,' 'Magnum Force' Director Ted Post Has Died

Prolific TV and film director Ted Post has died at the age of 95.

Although Post had his hand in a number of genres, he's perhaps most famous for his work on Westerns like "The Peacemaker," "Hang 'Em High" and "Rawhide" with Clint Eastwood, "Gunsmoke," and "Stagecoach." He also directed Eastwood (pictured above on set) in the "Dirty Harry" sequel "Magnum Force." Eastwood and Post didn't collaborate after that due to various disagreements.

Post also helmed the sequel "Beneath the Planet of the Apes," the pilot for "Cagney and Lacey," and more than a few episodes of "Peyton Place." Some of his more outré offerings include freaky horror exploitation flick "The Baby," "The Harrad Experiment" about swingin' sexual experimentation, and the Chuck Norris actioner "Good Guys Wear Black."

Post's legacy includes Pro Bono Productions, the nonprofit he started in 1996 to elevate the profiles of older actors in show business. "Our industry
See full article at Moviefone »

‘Magnum Force’ Director Ted Post Dies at 95

‘Magnum Force’ Director Ted Post Dies at 95
Ted Post, who directed numerous early TV shows as well as Clint Eastwood Western features “Hang ‘em High” and “Magnum Force,” died Tuesday in Santa Monica. He was 95.

He also directed more than 20 series of the Eastwood starring Western “Rawhide.”

Throughout the 1950s and 60s he helmed TV series starting with “Danger” in 1950, and going on to series including “Perry Mason,” “The Rifleman” and “Gunsmoke.”

In the 1960s, he directed episodes of “Twilight Zone,” “The Defenders,” “Combat!” and “Peyton Place.”

The 1973 film “Magnum Force” was the first of the “Dirty Harry” sequels. Post also helmed features “Beneath the Planet of the Apes,” “The Harrad Experiment” and “Go Tell the Spartans,” as well as the TV series “Rich Man, Poor Man — Book II” and the 1986 TV movie of “Stagecoach.”

Born in Brooklyn, Post was a theater usher before studying acting, but then moved into directing, starting onstage.

He is survived by his wife Thelma,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Magnum Force’ Director Ted Post Dies at 95

‘Magnum Force’ Director Ted Post Dies at 95
Ted Post, who directed numerous early TV shows as well as Clint Eastwood Western features “Hang ‘em High” and “Magnum Force,” died Tuesday in Santa Monica. He was 95.

He also directed more than 20 series of the Eastwood starring Western “Rawhide.”

Throughout the 1950s and 60s he helmed TV series starting with “Danger” in 1950, and going on to series including “Perry Mason,” “The Rifleman” and “Gunsmoke.”

In the 1960s, he directed episodes of “Twilight Zone,” “The Defenders,” “Combat!” and “Peyton Place.”

The 1973 film “Magnum Force” was the first of the “Dirty Harry” sequels. Post also helmed features “Beneath the Planet of the Apes,” “The Harrad Experiment” and “Go Tell the Spartans,” as well as the TV series “Rich Man, Poor Man — Book II” and the 1986 TV movie of “Stagecoach.”

Born in Brooklyn, Post was a theater usher before studying acting, but then moved into directing, starting onstage.

He is survived by his wife Thelma,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

70s Rewind: The Baby

Three years after guiding Beneath the Planet of the Apes to the big screen, director Ted Post completed three features that were all released in 1973: the right-wing sequel Magnum Force; the socially-experimental The Harrad Experiment; and the totally demented The Baby. When it came to subject matter, no one can say that Post wasn't versatile. Of his three 1973 features, The Baby was the only one rated PG in the U.S., but other countries seemed to understand its implicit depravity better than the MPAA; it received an "X" rating in the U.K. and was banned in Norway. (In contrast, the nudity-filled The Harrad Experiment received an "R" rating in the U.S. and a "15" rating in the U.K.) Post directed hundreds of episodes of...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

James Whitmore dies at 87

James Whitmore, who played such American icons as Harry Truman, Will Rogers and Theodore Roosevelt, died Friday of lung cancer at his home in Malibu. He was 87.

Whitmore was twice nominated for Academy Awards -- as best actor in 1976 for "Give 'em Hell, Harry!," in which he played Truman, and as best supporting actor in 1950 for the war movie "Battleground."

He also won an Emmy Award in 2000 for a guest-starring role on "The Practice," as well as a Tony Award for "Command Decision."

Whitmore was diagnosed with cancer a week before Thanksgiving. "My father believed that family came before everything, that work was just a vehicle in which to provide for your family," his son Steve Whitmore, who works as spokesman for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, told the Associated Press. "At the end, and in the last two and a half months of his life, he was surrounded by his family.
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

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